macro

adjective
mac·​ro | \ ˈma-(ˌ)krō How to pronounce macro (audio) \

Definition of macro

 (Entry 1 of 3)

1 : being large, thick, or exceptionally prominent
2a : of, involving, or intended for use with relatively large quantities or on a large scale
b : of or relating to macroeconomics
4 : of or relating to a macro lens or to close-up photography

macro

noun
plural macros

Definition of macro (Entry 2 of 3)

: a single computer instruction that stands for a sequence of operations

Definition of macro- (Entry 3 of 3)

: large : on a large scale macrofossil macromolecule macroscopic often used in compounds with a corresponding compound formed with micro-

Examples of macro in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web: Adjective On the menu today: the hackers that halted meat production, institutional investors adapt to new a macro landscape, Dogecoin rallies, and the White House CEA on how to combat cyberattacks. Daniel Tenreiro, National Review, 2 June 2021 How someone might think of a person, a stranger — that entirely developed out of the macro language structure that has been imposed on us. Los Angeles Times, 26 May 2021 Those macro trends are far from the whole story about public safety. Michael Smolens Columnist, San Diego Union-Tribune, 19 May 2021 The macro picture in Tokyo doesn't look good, however. Bernhard Warner, Fortune, 18 May 2021 While climate change could affect macro economies, the effort right now is largely focused on regulating financial companies. Simon Clark, WSJ, 16 May 2021 The macro problem is that our public schools operate as monopolies that stifle competition, discourage innovation, and imprison kids in failing schools. BostonGlobe.com, 14 May 2021 Jupiter has much bigger electrical storms than Earth, which increases the chances of a macro slicing through such a storm. Dan Falk, Smithsonian Magazine, 13 May 2021 The industry publishes safety guidelines, encourages guests to ski within their limits and releases macro statistics on injuries and fatalities each season. Gregory Thomas, San Francisco Chronicle, 5 May 2021 Recent Examples on the Web: Noun One of the great macro-traders of all time, Stan Druckenmiller, wrote an op-ed in the Wall Street Journal yesterday. Bryan Rich, Forbes, 11 May 2021 Shakespearean dramaturgy is a dance between macro and micro realms. Los Angeles Times, 23 Apr. 2021 But up close, when captured with a camera using a special lens called a macro, the animals can appear to loom as large as wild animals on a safari — a safari on another planet. New York Times, 30 Mar. 2021 Moves in stocks could be big and markets may be especially choppy in coming days because fewer people are trading as the holiday period starts, said Salman Ahmed, global head of macro at Fidelity International. Caitlin Mccabe, WSJ, 22 Dec. 2020 That is why even faulty or incomplete models are better than no models at all, and why theoretical macro remains a worthy pursuit. Daniel Tenreiro, National Review, 23 Feb. 2021 Why individually invest in a firm, for example, if underemployment, deflation or inflation, or other features of the macro-environment make future sales uncertain? Robert Hockett, Forbes, 3 Mar. 2021 Underneath it all, the fundamentals of macro remain sound and useful. Daniel Tenreiro, National Review, 23 Feb. 2021 Bruce Pang, head of macro and strategy research at China Renaissance Securities, said Beijing was wary of large internet companies profiting at the expense of smaller businesses, or misusing their vast troves of user data. Stella Yifan Xie, WSJ, 24 Dec. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'macro.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of macro

Adjective

1923, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Noun

1959, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for macro

Adjective

independent use of macro-

Noun

short for macroinstruction, from macro- + instruction

Combining form

borrowed from Greek makro-, combining form of makrós "long, tall, high, large" — more at meager

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Last Updated

10 Jun 2021

Cite this Entry

“Macro.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/macro. Accessed 14 Jun. 2021.

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More Definitions for macro

macro

noun

English Language Learners Definition of macro

 (Entry 1 of 2)

computers : a set of instructions that causes a computer to perform a series of tasks

English Language Learners Definition of macro- (Entry 2 of 2)

: large

macro

adjective
mac·​ro | \ ˈmak-(ˌ)rō How to pronounce macro (audio) \

Medical Definition of macro

1 : large, thick, or excessively developed macro layer of the cerebral cortex
2a : of or involving large quantities : intended for use with large quantities a macro procedure in analysis carrying out a test on a macro scale
b : gross sense 1b the macro appearance of a specimen

More from Merriam-Webster on macro

Nglish: Translation of macro for Spanish Speakers

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