lecture

noun
lec·​ture | \ ˈlek-chər How to pronounce lecture (audio) , -shər \

Definition of lecture

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : a discourse given before an audience or class especially for instruction
2 : a formal reproof

lecture

verb
lectured; lecturing\ ˈlek-​chə-​riŋ How to pronounce lecture (audio) , ˈlek-​shriŋ \

Definition of lecture (Entry 2 of 2)

intransitive verb

: to deliver a lecture or a course of lectures

transitive verb

1 : to deliver a lecture to
2 : to reprove formally

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Other Words from lecture

Noun

lectureship \ ˈlek-​chər-​ˌship How to pronounce lecture (audio) , -​shər-​ \ noun

Verb

lecturer \ ˈlek-​chər-​ər How to pronounce lecture (audio) , ˈlek-​shrər \ noun

Examples of lecture in a Sentence

Noun She's planning to give a series of lectures on modern art. Several hundred people are expected to attend the lecture. I came home late and got a lecture from my parents. I gave her a lecture about doing better in school. Verb She lectures in art at the local college. They lectured their children about the importance of honesty. I lectured her about doing better in school.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun Still, as one of his students drove him to the lecture, Hawking was tetchy. Samanth Subramanian, The New Republic, "The Mysteries of Stephen Hawking’s Universe," 6 Apr. 2021 The next virtual lunch lecture by the Howard County Historical Society will take place on Friday. Janet Kusterer, baltimoresun.com, "Signs of spring blooming in Ellicott City as Main Street Marketplace kicks off | MOSTLY MAIN," 1 Apr. 2021 The abuse and circulation of African American human remains for research dates back at least to 1763, with the dissection of corpses of the enslaved for the first anatomy lecture in the American Colonies. Chip Colwell, The Conversation, "US museums hold the remains of thousands of Black people," 24 Mar. 2021 And by making such facilities as the lecture hall and the restaurant available to the public, officials hope to link the school to the community, benefiting students and residents. BostonGlobe.com, "Somerville builds for future with $256 million high school," 19 Mar. 2021 The museum hosted galleries devoted to Assyrian, Hatrean and Islamic civilizations; and contained exhibit space for prehistoric artifacts, a library, a lecture hall and areas for staff and storage. Richard Kurin, Smithsonian Magazine, "Iraq’s Cultural Museum in Mosul Is On the Road to Recovery," 19 Feb. 2021 The team bench setups were three rows deep, occupying the space of a campus lecture hall. Mike Anthony, courant.com, "Mike Anthony: Geno Auriemma, coaching in front of cardboard cutouts, can’t yet wrap his mind around the absurdity of 2020 college basketball settings," 16 Dec. 2020 Held in the National Constitution Center, with audience members seated safely distanced, the forum had the feel of an evening lecture hall on a college campus. Rebecca Morin, USA TODAY, "A town hall with Trump was testy, a forum with Biden was much quieter: Here are takeaways from each," 16 Oct. 2020 The lecture hall had been so packed, and the explosion so powerful, that at least 40 people were killed and more than 60 others wounded. Mujib Mashal, New York Times, "Her Study Center Was Bombed. She Still Topped Afghanistan’s National University Exam.," 25 Sep. 2020 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb When everyone goes to the opera, a woman named Maladie (Amy Manson) interrupts the show to slit the throat of the actor playing the devil and lecture everyone about God and an evil doctor. Jackson Mchenry, Vulture, "What the Hell Just Happened on The Nevers?," 11 Apr. 2021 Did Reagan lecture the Soviet government, the Cuban government, and so on? Jay Nordlinger, National Review, "A prisoner released, &c.," 12 Feb. 2021 The tea was courtesy of The Cozy Tea Cart in New Hampshire, which last month led a virtual tasting and lecture on the health benefits of tea. BostonGlobe.com, "Food programming has helped libraries nurture communities during COVID," 23 Mar. 2021 The scripts would treat food as a source of excitement and not lecture kids about nutritional content. Clint Worthington, Vulture, "How Do You Feed a Puppet? Behind the Tasty Edutainment of Waffles + Mochi," 17 Mar. 2021 Yet Biden did more than lament or lecture on Thursday. Susan B. Glasser, The New Yorker, "It’s Morning (and Mourning) in Biden’s America," 12 Mar. 2021 My father liked to read and lecture, and had a bad temper. Karla Cornejo Villavicencio, The New Yorker, "Waking Up from the American Dream," 18 Jan. 2021 Across an abyss of time that turns out to be less than four years ago, Theresa May stood up in the House of Commons as prime minister to lecture MPs on a point borrowed from the Sapir-Whorf hypothesis. Matthew Sweet, The Economist, "The good, the bad and the ugly: how to divorce with decorum," 27 Dec. 2020 His most recent choice, Kayleigh McEnany, has used her sporadic briefings to scold reporters on their choice of questions, lecture them about the content of their stories, and reinforce baseless claims by the president. Will Weissert, Star Tribune, "Psaki, next White House press secretary, a veteran messenger," 2 Dec. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'lecture.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of lecture

Noun

15th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

circa 1590, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense

History and Etymology for lecture

Noun

Middle English, act of reading, from Late Latin lectura, from Latin lectus, past participle of legere

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Time Traveler for lecture

Time Traveler

The first known use of lecture was in the 15th century

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Statistics for lecture

Last Updated

27 Apr 2021

Cite this Entry

“Lecture.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/lecture. Accessed 6 May. 2021.

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More Definitions for lecture

lecture

noun

English Language Learners Definition of lecture

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a talk or speech given to a group of people to teach them about a particular subject
: a talk that criticizes someone's behavior in an angry or serious way

lecture

verb

English Language Learners Definition of lecture (Entry 2 of 2)

: to give a talk or a series of talks to a group of people to teach them about a particular subject
: to talk to (someone) in an angry or serious way

lecture

noun
lec·​ture | \ ˈlek-chər How to pronounce lecture (audio) \

Kids Definition of lecture

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : a talk or speech that teaches something
2 : a serious talk or scolding

lecture

verb
lectured; lecturing

Kids Definition of lecture (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : to give a talk or speech that teaches something
2 : to give a serious or angry talk to Dad lectured us about studying.

Other Words from lecture

lecturer noun

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Comments on lecture

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