laud

verb
\ ˈlȯd How to pronounce laud (audio) \
lauded; lauding; lauds

Definition of laud

 (Entry 1 of 3)

transitive verb

: praise, extol He was lauded for his accomplishments.

laud

noun

Definition of laud (Entry 2 of 3)

1 lauds or Lauds plural in form but singular or plural in construction : an office of solemn praise to God forming with matins (see matins sense 1) the first of the canonical hours (see canonical hour sense 2)
2 : praise, acclaim all glory, laud and honor to Thee— J. M. Neale

Laud

biographical name
\ ˈlȯd How to pronounce Laud (audio) \

Definition of Laud (Entry 3 of 3)

William 1573–1645 English prelate; archbishop of Canterbury (1633–45)

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Other Words from laud

Biographical name

Laudian \ ˈlȯ-​dē-​ən How to pronounce Laudian (audio) \ adjective

Synonyms & Antonyms for laud

Synonyms: Verb

Synonyms: Noun

Antonyms: Verb

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Examples of laud in a Sentence

Verb He was much lauded as a successful businessman. the critics have lauded the best-selling author's newest novel Noun an actor who in his lifetime received all the laud and honor that the theater world could bestow
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Recent Examples on the Web: Verb While Lawrence often gets lauded for his technical prowess, few, if any, have celebrated his football intelligence, body control and efficient movement patterns. John Owning, Dallas News, "Film room: Why Cowboys DE DeMarcus Lawrence is poised to post double-digit sacks in 2020," 25 May 2020 But infections also rose and intensive care units were swamped in Peru, Chile and Ecuador, all lauded for imposing early and aggressive business shutdowns and quarantines. Author: David Crary, Amy Forliti, Geir Moulson, Anchorage Daily News, "Holiday amid pandemic: Americans divided on how to respond," 24 May 2020 But infections also rose and intensive care units were swamped in Peru, Chile and Ecuador, all lauded for imposing early and aggressive business shutdowns and quarantines. David Crary, Amy Forliti And Geir Moulson, Houston Chronicle, "Holiday amid pandemic: Americans divided on how to respond," 24 May 2020 But infections also rose and intensive care units were swamped in Peru, Chile, and Ecuador, all lauded for imposing early and aggressive business shutdowns and quarantines. David Crary, BostonGlobe.com, "Americans largely wary as restrictions ease; virus news from overseas is mixed," 23 May 2020 That can happen via your own behavior and by lauding those leading the charge, such as first responders, health care workers, scientists and political leaders. Jeff Greenberg, The Conversation, "Coronavirus reminds you of death – and amplifies your core values, both bad and good," 21 May 2020 The only other story that compares is the release of Final Fantasy VII Remake, which was both lauded and controversial, in the way these things almost always are. Julie Muncy, Wired, "Now Is the Best Time for Videogame Reboots," 19 May 2020 And the wee Mazda, whose small, light rotary engine sits mostly behind the front wheels, delivers exactly the 50/50 weight distribution that's lauded for handling balance by vehicledynamics theoreticians. Larry Griffin, Car and Driver, "Comparison Test: 1993 Toyota Supra Turbo Takes On the Best Sports Cars of the Early 1990s," 12 May 2020 That’s a stark contrast from much of the game’s history, in which a little cheating to get ahead was not only largely condoned, but often lauded. Creg Stephenson | Cstephenson@al.com, al, "The story of Al Worthington, who once quit baseball over sign-stealing," 1 May 2020 Recent Examples on the Web: Noun The young priests rise by 6 a.m. each day and gather in the chapel to sing lauds, a morning prayer to praise God as the sun rises. Washington Post, "Young Nebraska priests’ chants become best-selling album," 24 May 2017

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'laud.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of laud

Verb

14th century, in the meaning defined above

Noun

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for laud

Verb

Latin laudare, from laud-, laus

Noun

Middle English laudes (plural), from Medieval Latin, from Latin, plural of laud-, laus praise

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Time Traveler for laud

Time Traveler

The first known use of laud was in the 14th century

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Statistics for laud

Last Updated

28 May 2020

Cite this Entry

“Laud.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/laud. Accessed 4 Jun. 2020.

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More Definitions for laud

laud

verb
How to pronounce Laud (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of laud

somewhat formal : to praise (someone or something)

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More from Merriam-Webster on laud

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for laud

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with laud

Spanish Central: Translation of laud

Nglish: Translation of laud for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of laud for Arabic Speakers

Comments on laud

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