juncture

noun
junc·​ture | \ ˈjəŋ(k)-chər \

Definition of juncture

1 : a point of time at this juncture especially : one made critical by a concurrence of circumstances
b : the manner of transition or mode of relationship between two consecutive sounds in speech
3 : an instance of joining : junction

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Synonyms for juncture

Synonyms

point

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Choose the Right Synonym for juncture

juncture, exigency, emergency, contingency, pinch, strait (or straits) crisis mean a critical or crucial time or state of affairs. juncture stresses the significant concurrence or convergence of events. an important juncture in our country's history exigency stresses the pressure of restrictions or urgency of demands created by a special situation. provide for exigencies emergency applies to a sudden unforeseen situation requiring prompt action to avoid disaster. the presence of mind needed to deal with emergencies contingency implies an emergency or exigency that is regarded as possible but uncertain of occurrence. contingency plans pinch implies urgency or pressure for action to a less intense degree than exigency or emergency. come through in a pinch strait, now commonly straits, applies to a troublesome situation from which escape is extremely difficult. in dire straits crisis applies to a juncture whose outcome will make a decisive difference. a crisis of confidence

Did You Know?

Juncture has many relatives in English - and some of them are easy to spot, whereas others are not so obvious. Juncture derives from the Latin verb jungere (to join), which gave us not only join and junction but also conjugal (relating to marriage) and junta (a group of persons controlling a government). Jungere also has distant etymological connections to joust, jugular, juxtapose, yoga and yoke. The use of juncture in English dates back to the 14th century. Originally, the word meant "a place where two or more things are joined," but by the 17th century it could also be used of an important point in time or of a stage in a process or activity.

Examples of juncture in a Sentence

Negotiations between the countries reached a critical juncture. At this juncture it looks like they are going to get a divorce. the juncture of two rivers
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Recent Examples on the Web

There's obviously no more knowledgeable or competent judge of what really happened at this most vital juncture of the 20th century than Chancellor Helmut Kohl of Germany. Maggie Maloney, Town & Country, "Read Brian Mulroney's Moving Eulogy at George H.W. Bush's Funeral," 5 Dec. 2018 For a jumper to pop a season-best leap at this juncture of the season isn’t guaranteed. Mark Stewart, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, "Waukesha South's Armoni Brown soars past the competition in the jumps," 31 May 2018 And at some point, people should begin to wonder if placing big bets on male politicians at this particular juncture of history is a mite risky, all else being equal. Ed Kilgore, Daily Intelligencer, "The Democrats Need to Reckon With the Reckoning When Choosing Candidates," 8 May 2018 MetLife’s board waived its age policy indefinitely in 2016 in a strong show of support for the executive at a critical juncture for the company. Leslie Scism, WSJ, "MetLife CEO Steven Kandarian to Retire in April," 8 Jan. 2019 The Wildkits are playing their best basketball at the season's most crucial juncture. Steve Reaven, chicagotribune.com, "Ryan Bost's defense helps Evanston exceed expectations, reach state," 15 Mar. 2018 At this critical juncture in the fight to save the scimitar-horned oryx, artificial insemination remains one of the most powerful tools at conservationists’ disposal. Katherine J. Wu, Smithsonian, "New Artificial Insemination Technique Successfully Breeds Critically Endangered Scimitar-Horned Oryx," 10 July 2018 Pavard scored a goal of the tournament contender at a crucial juncture in France's game; Laxalt showed outstanding composure towards the end of Uruguay's victory. SI.com, "Messi vs Ronaldo: The Myth of the One-Man Team & the Overwhelming Importance of Trust," 2 July 2018 At this critical juncture in our nation’s history, Texans and the American people deserve to have a say in the selection of the next lifetime appointment to the Supreme Court. Glenn Fleishman, Fortune, "McConnell Argues Against Confirming New Justice This Year (If It Were 2016)," 27 June 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'juncture.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of juncture

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 2a

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Dictionary Entries near juncture

junction

junction box

junctural

juncture

juncus

jundy

June

Statistics for juncture

Last Updated

12 Feb 2019

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Time Traveler for juncture

The first known use of juncture was in the 14th century

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More Definitions for juncture

juncture

noun

English Language Learners Definition of juncture

: an important point in a process or activity
: a place where things join

juncture

noun
junc·​ture | \ ˈjəŋk-chər \

Kids Definition of juncture

: an important or particular point or stage in a process or activity

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More from Merriam-Webster on juncture

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with juncture

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for juncture

Spanish Central: Translation of juncture

Nglish: Translation of juncture for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of juncture for Arabic Speakers

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