intrepid

adjective
in·​trep·​id | \ in-ˈtre-pəd How to pronounce intrepid (audio) \

Definition of intrepid

: characterized by resolute fearlessness, fortitude, and endurance an intrepid explorer

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Other Words from intrepid

intrepidity \ ˌin-​trə-​ˈpi-​də-​tē How to pronounce intrepid (audio) \ noun
intrepidly \ in-​ˈtre-​pəd-​lē How to pronounce intrepid (audio) \ adverb
intrepidness noun

Don't Be Afraid to Learn About Intrepid

You need not be afraid to find out the origins of today’s word, although its history does include fear. Intrepid derives from the Latin word intrepidus, itself formed by the combination of the prefix in- (meaning "not") and trepidus, meaning "alarmed." Other relatives of "trepidus" in English include "trepidation" and "trepidatious," as well as "trepid" (which actually predates "intrepid" and means "fearful") and even the rare "trepidity" (a synonym for "trepidation" in the sense of "fear, apprehension"). Synonyms for "intrepid" include "courageous," "valiant," "fearless," "valorous," and simply "brave."

Examples of intrepid in a Sentence

The heroes are intrepid small-business owners, investigative reporters, plaintiffs and their lawyers, and, of course, Nader himself and his grass-roots organizations. — Jonathan Chait, New York Times Book Review, 3 Feb. 2008 Author and explorer Dame Freya Stark was one of the most intrepid adventurers of all time. (T. E. Lawrence, no slouch in the travel department himself, called her "gallant" and "remarkable.") — Kimberly Robinson, Travel & Leisure, December 1999 Meanwhile, the intrepid Florentine traveler Marco Polo had been to China and brought back with him a noodle dish that became Italian pasta … — Norman F. Cantor, The Civilization of the Middle Ages, 1993 an intrepid explorer who probed parts of the rain forest never previously attempted
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Recent Examples on the Web Starting Friday, intrepid cold weather fanatics or just people dying to get outdoors can find icy renditions of the Surrealist artwork and four other masterpieces in various Minneapolis parks. Alicia Eler, Star Tribune, "An icy surprise awaits art lovers in Minneapolis parks," 18 Feb. 2021 When co-owner and intrepid counter guy Max Okray opens the door at 9 a.m., he is often greeted by a line — socially distanced, of course — of customers that can meander for almost two blocks. Sharyn Jackson, Star Tribune, "5 best things our food writers ate in the Twin Cities this week," 5 Feb. 2021 There were a lot of movies to see, on streaming platforms or video on demand and even, for intrepid or irresponsible cinephiles, in cinemas. New York Times, "The Oscars Are a Mess. Let’s Make Them Messier.," 27 Jan. 2021 Before the nineteenth century, there were a few intrepid explorations into the mountains—by Rajput kings and Mongols, by Marco Polo, and by a smattering of determined Jesuit missionaries. Akash Kapur, The New Yorker, "Can We See Past the Myth of the Himalaya?," 18 Jan. 2021 Thanks to six intrepid young people in Portugal, European nations may finally have to reckon with that fact. Popular Science, "A lawsuit filed by children has forced 33 countries to rethink their climate goals," 5 Jan. 2021 Ancient Egyptian legends tell of a magical faraway land where intrepid travelers could obtain wondrous products including gold, frankincense, and myrrh. Colin Barras, Science | AAAS, "3300-year-old baboon skull may tell of mysterious ancient kingdom," 15 Dec. 2020 For the intrepid cook Cookware, ingredients and instructions to match the recipient’s cultural cravings, such as Thai: Hard-to-source Thai ingredients such as makrut limes, $17 from Angkor Cambodian Food. Dallas News, "30+ holiday gift ideas for every Texas cook," 4 Dec. 2020 Perhaps the happiest art news of this dismal year is that intrepid new galleries continue to open. Andrea K. Scott, The New Yorker, "The Best Art of 2020," 30 Dec. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'intrepid.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of intrepid

1680, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for intrepid

Latin intrepidus, from in- + trepidus alarmed — more at trepidation

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Time Traveler for intrepid

Time Traveler

The first known use of intrepid was in 1680

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Last Updated

24 Feb 2021

Cite this Entry

“Intrepid.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/intrepid. Accessed 6 Mar. 2021.

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More Definitions for intrepid

intrepid

adjective

English Language Learners Definition of intrepid

literary + often humorous : feeling no fear : very bold or brave

intrepid

adjective
in·​trep·​id | \ in-ˈtre-pəd How to pronounce intrepid (audio) \

Kids Definition of intrepid

: feeling no fear : bold

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Comments on intrepid

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