intrepid

adjective
in·​trep·​id | \ in-ˈtre-pəd \

Definition of intrepid

: characterized by resolute fearlessness, fortitude, and endurance an intrepid explorer

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Other Words from intrepid

intrepidity \ ˌin-​trə-​ˈpi-​də-​tē \ noun
intrepidly \ in-​ˈtre-​pəd-​lē \ adverb
intrepidness noun

Don't Be Afraid to Learn About Intrepid

You need not be afraid to find out the origins of today’s word, although its history does include fear. Intrepid derives from the Latin word intrepidus, itself formed by the combination of the prefix in- (meaning "not") and trepidus, meaning "alarmed." Other relatives of "trepidus" in English include "trepidation" and "trepidatious," as well as "trepid" (which actually predates "intrepid" and means "fearful") and even the rare "trepidity" (a synonym for "trepidation" in the sense of "fear, apprehension"). Synonyms for "intrepid" include "courageous," "valiant," "fearless," "valorous," and simply "brave."

Examples of intrepid in a Sentence

The heroes are intrepid small-business owners, investigative reporters, plaintiffs and their lawyers, and, of course, Nader himself and his grass-roots organizations. — Jonathan Chait, New York Times Book Review, 3 Feb. 2008 Author and explorer Dame Freya Stark was one of the most intrepid adventurers of all time. (T. E. Lawrence, no slouch in the travel department himself, called her "gallant" and "remarkable.") — Kimberly Robinson, Travel & Leisure, December 1999 Meanwhile, the intrepid Florentine traveler Marco Polo had been to China and brought back with him a noodle dish that became Italian pasta … — Norman F. Cantor, The Civilization of the Middle Ages, 1993 an intrepid explorer who probed parts of the rain forest never previously attempted
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Recent Examples on the Web

Almost a generation before Julia Child, my great-grandmother was not merely a terrific cook, but also a dogged food reporter, an intrepid food explorer, and a curious food historian. Elizabeth Gilbert, Good Housekeeping, "Cook's Heaven," 6 Mar. 2012 The intrepid three-piece brings its hammock-and-headphones tunes to the larger Moore Theatre after playing Neumos this spring. 8 p.m. The Seattle Times, "Everything you need to know about the hottest tickets in town: Seattle events for November 2018," 26 Oct. 2018 But hey, maybe some intrepid soul could figure out how to 3D print extra parts or rewrite the firmware or ... something. John Wenz, Popular Mechanics, "Sony Robo-Dog Owners Can No Longer Repair Their Pups," 19 June 2015 Pull the thing and the other thing Enter our intrepid trio of engineers. Chris Lee, Ars Technica, "Awesome tiny gyroscope promising but not ready for prime time," 9 Nov. 2018 Offering 20x more suction power than most robot vacs, this intrepid household cleaner features intelligent obstacle detection and eliminates dust and spills on practically any surface. Popular Mechanics Shop Team, Popular Mechanics, "This Samsung Star Wars Robot Vacuum Keeps Things Spotless," 26 Sep. 2018 For The House with a Clock in Its Walls, Bellairs drew inspiration from the public’s rising fascination with the occult as well as the perennial success of intrepid juvenile heroes like Tom Swift, Danny Dunn, and Nancy Drew. Noel Murray, The Verge, "For more kid-friendly horror like The House with a Clock in Its Walls, stream The Gate," 21 Sep. 2018 Over the years, intrepid fans have used the ebbs and flows of Harington’s real-life hairstyle as a way to decipher upcoming GoT plot details. Dan Barna, Glamour, "Kit Harington Just Confirmed a Theory About Jon Snow's Hair Fans Have Had for Years," 21 Sep. 2018 Over the years, intrepid fans have used the ebbs and flows of Harington’s real-life hairstyle as a way to decipher upcoming Game of Thrones plot details. Dan Barna, Allure, "Kit Harington Explains the Significance of Jon Snow’s Hair to the Plot of Game of Thrones," 21 Sep. 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'intrepid.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of intrepid

1680, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for intrepid

Latin intrepidus, from in- + trepidus alarmed — more at trepidation

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Statistics for intrepid

Last Updated

7 Jan 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for intrepid

The first known use of intrepid was in 1680

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More Definitions for intrepid

intrepid

adjective

English Language Learners Definition of intrepid

: feeling no fear : very bold or brave

intrepid

adjective
in·​trep·​id | \ in-ˈtre-pəd \

Kids Definition of intrepid

: feeling no fear : bold

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More from Merriam-Webster on intrepid

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for intrepid

Spanish Central: Translation of intrepid

Nglish: Translation of intrepid for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of intrepid for Arabic Speakers

Comments on intrepid

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