infuse

verb
in·fuse | \in-ˈfyüz \
infused; infusing

Definition of infuse 

transitive verb

1a : to cause to be permeated with something (such as a principle or quality) that alters usually for the better infuse the team with confidence

b : introduce, insinuate a new spirit was infused into American artAmer. Guide Series: N. Y.

2 : inspire, animate the sense of purpose that infuses scientific research

3 : to steep in liquid (such as water) without boiling so as to extract the soluble constituents or principles

4 : to administer or inject by infusion stem cells were infused into the patient

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Other Words from infuse

infuser noun

Choose the Right Synonym for infuse

infuse, suffuse, imbue, ingrain, inoculate, leaven mean to introduce one thing into another so as to affect it throughout. infuse implies a pouring in of something that gives new life or significance. new members infused enthusiasm into the club suffuse implies a spreading through of something that gives an unusual color or quality. a room suffused with light imbue implies the introduction of a quality that fills and permeates the whole being. imbue students with intellectual curiosity ingrain, used only in the passive or past participle, suggests the deep implanting of a quality or trait. clung to ingrained habits inoculate implies an imbuing or implanting with a germinal idea and often suggests stealth or subtlety. an electorate inoculated with dangerous ideas leaven implies introducing something that enlivens, tempers, or markedly alters the total quality. a serious play leavened with comic moments

Examples of infuse in a Sentence

She has infused her followers with confidence. He has found ways to infuse new energy into his performances. She has infused confidence into her followers. His work is infused with anger. The tea should be allowed to infuse for several minutes. You should infuse the tea for several minutes.
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Recent Examples on the Web

The goal was always to take this genre and infuse it with real human emotions. Carolyn Giardina, The Hollywood Reporter, "'Ant-Man and the Wasp' Editor Says Scott Lang Needs to Find "Balance" in the Sequel," 5 July 2018 What visitors discovered, however, was how gardens - like people - are continually changing and how their stewards regularly infuse them with new life. Joan Hunt, Courant Community, "Dynamic Webb House Garden: More Than Just A Pretty Face," 3 July 2018 Macron has often toyed with this pairing while abroad, most notably on her trips to India and Washington, D.C. this March and April, which saw her infuse her tailored ensembles with feminine flourish through blush and pink tones. Edward Barsamian, Vogue, "Brigitte Macron at Couture? The French First Lady Arrives in an Unexpected Look," 2 July 2018 The technique involves expanding immune cells found to target mutations specific to a patient's cancer, then infusing them back in the patient. Todd Ackerman, Houston Chronicle, "Immunotherapy defeats a breast cancer that had defied other treatments," 5 June 2018 And then taking Chinoiserie and my heritage and infusing it into that world. refinery29.com, "Alexander Wang Celebrates His Immigrant Roots With ‘Collection One’," 4 June 2018 And then taking Chinoiserie and my heritage and infusing it into that world. Lauren Alexis Fisher, Harper's BAZAAR, "Alexander Wang's "Immigrant Americana" Runway Included Bandanas, Biker Gear, and Childish Gambino," 4 June 2018 The creators have infused it with modern rhythms, as techno beats wind their way into Victorian dances. Rachel Syme, The New Republic, "Picnic at Hanging Rock," 22 May 2018 Ayesha Curry melts butter in the pan and infuses it with fresh rosemary (see recipe), while her partner at International Smoke, Michael Mina, spreads softened butter on the slices of bread. Sarah Fritsche, San Francisco Chronicle, "Guide to making the perfect grilled cheese sandwich," 12 Apr. 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'infuse.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of infuse

1526, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

History and Etymology for infuse

Middle English, to pour in, from Middle French & Latin; Middle French infuser, from Latin infusus, past participle of infundere to pour in, from in- + fundere to pour — more at found

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Statistics for infuse

Last Updated

20 Oct 2018

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for infuse

The first known use of infuse was in 1526

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More Definitions for infuse

infuse

verb

English Language Learners Definition of infuse

: to cause (a person or thing) to be filled with something (such as a quality)

: to cause (something, such as a quality) to be added or introduced into a person or thing

: to allow something (such as tea or herbs) to stay in a liquid (such as hot water) in order to flavor the liquid

infuse

verb
in·fuse | \in-ˈfyüz \
infused; infusing

Kids Definition of infuse

1 : to put in as if by pouring The leader infused spirit into the group.

2 : to steep without boiling infuse tea leaves

Other Words from infuse

infusion \in-ˈfyü-zhən \ noun

infuse

verb
in·fuse | \in-ˈfyüz \
infused; infusing

Medical Definition of infuse 

transitive verb

1 : to steep in liquid (as water) without boiling so as to extract the soluble constituents or principles

2 : to administer or inject by infusion especially intravenously infuse the blood with glucose infuse a solution of lactate

intransitive verb

: to administer a solution by infusion

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Comments on infuse

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to reject or criticize sharply

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