infringe

verb
in·​fringe | \ in-ˈfrinj How to pronounce infringe (audio) \
infringed; infringing

Definition of infringe

transitive verb

1 : to encroach upon in a way that violates law or the rights of another infringe a patent
2 obsolete : defeat, frustrate

intransitive verb

: encroach used with on or upon infringe on our rights

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Other Words from infringe

infringer noun

Choose the Right Synonym for infringe

trespass, encroach, infringe, invade mean to make inroads upon the property, territory, or rights of another. trespass implies an unwarranted or unlawful intrusion. hunters trespassing on farmland encroach suggests gradual or stealthy entrance upon another's territory or usurpation of another's rights or possessions. the encroaching settlers displacing the native peoples infringe implies an encroachment clearly violating a right or prerogative. infringing a copyright invade implies a hostile and injurious entry into the territory or sphere of another. accused of invading their privacy

Examples of infringe in a Sentence

They claim that his use of the name infringes their copyright. Her rights must not be infringed.
Recent Examples on the Web Jackson called religious liberty a foundational tenet of our government and that the Supreme Court has made clear that government can't infringe on religious rights. Adia Robinson, ABC News, "GOP senators grill potential Biden Supreme Court pick," 28 Apr. 2021 Submission must not have won any previous award that may be in conflict with this Search, and must not infringe upon the copyrights, trademarks, rights of privacy, publicity or other intellectual property or other rights of any person or entity. TIME.com, "Terms and Conditions: TIME’s 2021 Best Inventions Search," 26 Apr. 2021 These are real people having real therapy with a real therapist and filming the show can’t infringe on that dynamic any more than absolutely necessary. Tony Bradley, Forbes, "How ‘Couples Therapy’ Used Technology To Cope With Covid-19," 18 Apr. 2021 Biden says his efforts don't infringe on the Second Amendment right to bear arms. Stephen Collinson And Caitlin Hu, CNN, "Don't be misled by good Covid-19 news in some nations. The pandemic is worse than ever elsewhere," 9 Apr. 2021 Observers worry the bill in its current form won’t win approval of conservatives in the Senate, many of whom have argued the bill would infringe on religious rights. Washington Post, "As senators debate her rights, a transgender teenager gives a confident testimony," 17 Mar. 2021 But Brazil's far-right president, Jair Bolsonaro, remains unconvinced of the need for restrictions on activity, arguing that such measures infringe on personal freedom and the resulting economic doom would be worse than the virus itself. ABC News, "As Brazil becomes COVID-19 epicenter, cases rise across South America," 2 Apr. 2021 Jim Davids, chief counsel for the Founding Freedoms Law Center — the foundation’s legal arm — said the state guidelines infringe on families’ constitutional rights. Washington Post, "Virginia Education Department sued over guidelines to protect transgender students," 30 Mar. 2021 Mask-wearing and other preventative measures have become a partisan flashpoint over the course of the pandemic, with some on the right saying the health measures infringe on their civil liberties. Savannah Behrmann, USA TODAY, "A culture war has been brewing at the Capitol for years. Now it's at a boiling point.," 26 Feb. 2021

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'infringe.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of infringe

1513, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1

History and Etymology for infringe

Medieval Latin infringere, from Latin, to break, crush, from in- + frangere to break — more at break

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Time Traveler for infringe

Time Traveler

The first known use of infringe was in 1513

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Statistics for infringe

Last Updated

5 May 2021

Cite this Entry

“Infringe.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/infringe. Accessed 6 May. 2021.

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More Definitions for infringe

infringe

verb

English Language Learners Definition of infringe

: to do something that does not obey or follow (a rule, law, etc.)
: to wrongly limit or restrict (something, such as another person's rights)

infringe

verb
in·​fringe | \ in-ˈfrinj How to pronounce infringe (audio) \
infringed; infringing

Kids Definition of infringe

1 : to fail to obey or act in agreement with : violate infringe a law
2 : to go further than is right or fair to another : encroach

Other Words from infringe

infringement \ -​mənt \ noun

infringe

verb
in·​fringe | \ in-ˈfrinj How to pronounce infringe (audio) \
infringed; infringing

Legal Definition of infringe

transitive verb

: to encroach upon in a way that violates law or the rights of another the right of the people to keep and bear arms, shall not be infringedU.S. Constitution amend. II especially : to violate a holder's rights under (a copyright, patent, trademark, or trade name)

Other Words from infringe

infringer noun

History and Etymology for infringe

Medieval Latin infringere, from Latin, to break, crush, from in- in + frangere to break

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Comments on infringe

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