infringe

verb

in·​fringe in-ˈfrinj How to pronounce infringe (audio)
infringed; infringing

transitive verb

1
: to encroach upon in a way that violates law or the rights of another
infringe a patent
2
obsolete : defeat, frustrate

intransitive verb

: encroach
used with on or upon
infringe on our rights
infringer noun
Choose the Right Synonym for infringe

trespass, encroach, infringe, invade mean to make inroads upon the property, territory, or rights of another.

trespass implies an unwarranted or unlawful intrusion.

hunters trespassing on farmland

encroach suggests gradual or stealthy entrance upon another's territory or usurpation of another's rights or possessions.

the encroaching settlers displacing the native peoples

infringe implies an encroachment clearly violating a right or prerogative.

infringing a copyright

invade implies a hostile and injurious entry into the territory or sphere of another.

accused of invading their privacy

Examples of infringe in a Sentence

They claim that his use of the name infringes their copyright. Her rights must not be infringed.
Recent Examples on the Web But Santos alleges in his lawsuit Kimmel’s use of the videos infringed on Santos’ copyright, with Santos’ lawyers arguing Cameo’s terms of service do not permit users to broadcast videos on national television. James Farrell, Forbes, 17 Feb. 2024 In December, the ITC imposed a ban on the Series 9 and Ultra 2 models of the Apple Watch after finalizing its decision that the blood oxygen sensors in the devices did indeed infringe on patents owned by Masimo and its subsidiary Cercacor Laboratories. TIME, 8 Feb. 2024 Political views around firearms have also affected research funding, but preventing firearm injuries and deaths doesn’t have to infringe upon legal firearm ownership, experts say. Deidre McPhillips, CNN, 7 Feb. 2024 However, after the change was made, state Republicans filed a lawsuit that argued the new law infringed on the party’s right to decide how to nominate candidates. Brendan Rascius, Miami Herald, 1 Feb. 2024 The lawsuit alleges that the company infringed on copyright by using Carlin’s materials to train the chatbot without seeking permission or licensing. J. Kim Murphy, Variety, 26 Jan. 2024 Women are being asked to deny their uniqueness and nature to cater to males who infringe on their opportunities and spaces. Riley Gaines, National Review, 25 Jan. 2024 The company alleged that Apple had infringed on its patents for a smartwatch sensor that uses lights to measure the concentration of oxygen in the wearer’s blood. Michael Calore, WIRED, 17 Jan. 2024 Youth advocates say mask bans disproportionately target Black and brown youth, limit self-expression and may infringe on people’s constitutional rights. Tribune News Service, The Mercury News, 15 Jan. 2024 See More

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'infringe.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

Etymology

Medieval Latin infringere, from Latin, to break, crush, from in- + frangere to break — more at break

First Known Use

1513, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1

Time Traveler
The first known use of infringe was in 1513

Dictionary Entries Near infringe

Cite this Entry

“Infringe.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/infringe. Accessed 24 Feb. 2024.

Kids Definition

infringe

verb
in·​fringe in-ˈfrinj How to pronounce infringe (audio)
infringed; infringing
1
: to fail to obey or act in agreement with : violate
infringe a treaty
2
: encroach sense 1
infringe on a person's rights
infringement
-mənt
noun
infringer noun

Legal Definition

infringe

verb
in·​fringe in-ˈfrinj How to pronounce infringe (audio)
infringed; infringing

transitive verb

: to encroach upon in a way that violates law or the rights of another
the right of the people to keep and bear arms, shall not be infringedU.S. Constitution amend. II
especially : to violate a holder's rights under (a copyright, patent, trademark, or trade name)
infringer noun
Etymology

Medieval Latin infringere, from Latin, to break, crush, from in- in + frangere to break

More from Merriam-Webster on infringe

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