infringe

verb
in·​fringe | \ in-ˈfrinj \
infringed; infringing

Definition of infringe

transitive verb

1 : to encroach upon in a way that violates law or the rights of another infringe a patent
2 obsolete : defeat, frustrate

intransitive verb

: encroach used with on or upon infringe on our rights

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Other Words from infringe

infringer noun

Choose the Right Synonym for infringe

trespass, encroach, infringe, invade mean to make inroads upon the property, territory, or rights of another. trespass implies an unwarranted or unlawful intrusion. hunters trespassing on farmland encroach suggests gradual or stealthy entrance upon another's territory or usurpation of another's rights or possessions. the encroaching settlers displacing the native peoples infringe implies an encroachment clearly violating a right or prerogative. infringing a copyright invade implies a hostile and injurious entry into the territory or sphere of another. accused of invading their privacy

Examples of infringe in a Sentence

They claim that his use of the name infringes their copyright. Her rights must not be infringed.

Recent Examples on the Web

The Supreme Court ruled that identifying who was in the NAACP would infringe on the right to privacy and free association. Diana Budds, Curbed, "Facial recognition is becoming one of the 21st century’s biggest public space issues," 19 Oct. 2018 Often, creators will issue a takedown notice against an infringing copy of their work only to find another copy has been uploaded a few hours or days later. Timothy B. Lee, Ars Technica, "An EU copyright bill could force YouTube-style filtering across the Web," 11 Sep. 2018 Burberry seeks an injunction barring Target from selling any infringing items, as well as destroying existing products, and monetary damages of up to $2 million and court costs. Janine Puhak, Fox News, "Burberry is suing Target for copying iconic plaid," 10 May 2018 The conservative argument is that Congress can’t infringe on the executive authority; that constitutionally, the president maintains the power to control who serves in the executive branch. Tara Golshan, Vox, "The Senate bill to protect Robert Mueller’s Russia investigation, explained," 26 Apr. 2018 Your Content is not false or libelous and does not infringe the privacy, data protection or confidentiality rights of any third party. Harper's BAZAAR, "Reader Submission Terms and Community Guidelines," 13 Jan. 2015 In November 2016, Olaplex filed a lawsuit against L'Oréal in the U.K., claiming that the brand's Smartbond Step 1 product infringes on the patent for Olaplex No. 1 Bond Multiplier. Marci Robin, Allure, "Olaplex Wins U.K. Lawsuit Against L'Oréal in Smartbond Patent Infringement Case," 12 June 2018 Add to that the higher price tag of a plane ticket and people may feel entitled to lash out against people who infringe on their comfort. Aditi Shrikant, Vox, "Why there are so many viral confrontations on airplanes," 2 Nov. 2018 The union says that the new policy, which the league imposed without consultation with the NFLPA, is inconsistent with the collective bargaining agreement and infringes on players' rights. CBS News, "NFL players union files grievance over new national anthem policy," 10 July 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'infringe.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of infringe

1513, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1

History and Etymology for infringe

Medieval Latin infringere, from Latin, to break, crush, from in- + frangere to break — more at break

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Statistics for infringe

Last Updated

4 Feb 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for infringe

The first known use of infringe was in 1513

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More Definitions for infringe

infringe

verb

English Language Learners Definition of infringe

: to do something that does not obey or follow (a rule, law, etc.)
: to wrongly limit or restrict (something, such as another person's rights)

infringe

verb
in·​fringe | \ in-ˈfrinj \
infringed; infringing

Kids Definition of infringe

1 : to fail to obey or act in agreement with : violate infringe a law
2 : to go further than is right or fair to another : encroach

Other Words from infringe

infringement \ -​mənt \ noun

infringe

verb
in·​fringe | \ in-ˈfrinj \
infringed; infringing

Legal Definition of infringe

transitive verb

: to encroach upon in a way that violates law or the rights of another the right of the people to keep and bear arms, shall not be infringedU.S. Constitution amend. II especially : to violate a holder's rights under (a copyright, patent, trademark, or trade name)

Other Words from infringe

infringer noun

History and Etymology for infringe

Medieval Latin infringere, from Latin, to break, crush, from in- in + frangere to break

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More from Merriam-Webster on infringe

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with infringe

Spanish Central: Translation of infringe

Nglish: Translation of infringe for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of infringe for Arabic Speakers

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