twinge

1 of 2

noun

1
: a sudden sharp stab of pain
2
: a moral or emotional pang
a twinge of conscience
a twinge of sympathy

twinge

2 of 2

verb

twinged; twinging ˈtwin-jiŋ How to pronounce twinge (audio) or twingeing

transitive verb

1
dialect : pluck, tweak
2
: to affect with a sharp pain or pang

intransitive verb

: to feel a sudden sharp local pain

Examples of twinge in a Sentence

Noun He felt a twinge of arthritis when he stood up. I still feel an occasional twinge in my leg from the accident. I felt a twinge of guilt.
Recent Examples on the Web
Noun
Herzog doesn’t need to hammer home the twinges of resonance in Ibsen’s text. Sara Holdren, Vulture, 18 Mar. 2024 With a setup this lavish, even Jack might feel a twinge of envy. John Vorwald, Robb Report, 20 Apr. 2024 Holmberg — who works in group ticket sales for the San Jose Sharks — admitted to feeling some twinge of sadness about his playing career ending. David K. Li, NBC News, 10 Feb. 2024 What follows is a delightfully breezy action flick that may even carry twinges of genre nostalia. Gwen Ihnat and Kevin Jaconsen, EW.com, 12 Aug. 2023 Like her outfit, her makeup had a twinge of darkness, from her smoky lids to her ultra-long eyelash extensions, which practically reached her temples. Bailey Richards, Peoplemag, 2 Oct. 2023 The term is a catch-all that covers everything from a small twinge to a full-on rupture. Nicole Wetsman, Popular Science, 24 May 2023 Even as a child in the 1960s, Jan Davis felt a twinge of resentment about her hometown, Huntsville, Ala., being overlooked. Emily Cochrane, New York Times, 5 Aug. 2023 Pregnancy is full of new sensations, from unfamiliar aches and pains to those twinges in your stomach when your baby decides to give your belly a kick from within. Kimberly Zapata, Parents, 10 Aug. 2023
Verb
His speech soon turned into a lament twinged with guilt. Valerie Trapp, The Atlantic, 26 Apr. 2024 The twist, however, is the sauce — a rich, steaming hot broth twinged with tomato and a gentle chile buzz that more closely resembles a soup. Dominic Armato, azcentral, 6 Dec. 2019

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'twinge.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

Etymology

Verb

Middle English twengen, from Old English twengan; akin to Old High German zwengen to pinch

First Known Use

Noun

1608, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1

Time Traveler
The first known use of twinge was before the 12th century

Dictionary Entries Near twinge

Cite this Entry

“Twinge.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/twinge. Accessed 24 Jun. 2024.

Kids Definition

twinge

1 of 2 verb
twinged; twinging ˈtwin-jiŋ How to pronounce twinge (audio) or twingeing
: to affect with or feel a sudden sharp pain

twinge

2 of 2 noun
1
: a sudden sharp stab of pain
2
: moral or emotional distress
a twinge of regret

Medical Definition

twinge

noun
: a sudden sharp stab of pain

More from Merriam-Webster on twinge

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