induce

verb
in·​duce | \ in-ˈdüs How to pronounce induce (audio) , -ˈdyüs \
induced; inducing

Definition of induce

transitive verb

1a : to move by persuasion or influence
b : to call forth or bring about by influence or stimulation
2a : effect, cause
b : to cause the formation of
c : to produce by induction induce an electric current
3 : to determine by induction specifically : to infer from particulars

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Inducing is usually gentle persuasion; you may, for instance, induce a friend to go to a concert, or induce a child to stop crying. An inducement is something that might lure you to do something, though inducements are occasionally a bit menacing, like the Godfather's offer that you can't refuse. Induce also sometimes means "produce;" thus, doctors must at times induce labor in a pregnant woman. Notice that induct and induction are somewhat different from induce and inducement, though they come from the identical roots.

Examples of induce in a Sentence

The advertisement is meant to induce people to eat more fruit. No one knows what induced him to leave. Her illness was induced by overwork. They will induce labor to avoid complications.
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Recent Examples on the Web The microbiology toolbox includes techniques to induce mutations in viruses that give the microbes new powers. Emily Willingham, Scientific American, 14 June 2021 Thoughts about resuming in-person socializing post-vaccination tend to induce fears of social mortification in people. Anna Russell, The New Yorker, 3 June 2021 Several pointed in particular to concerns about administering at the same time vaccines that are known to be reactogenic — likely to induce side effects in a fair percentage of people who receive them. Helen Branswell, STAT, 14 May 2021 Reyes gave false, inaccurate and incomplete legal and immigration advice to victims in order to induce them to retain his services and those of EHR Ministries, prosecutors said. orlandosentinel.com, 13 Apr. 2021 According to the lawsuit, the companies involved in the scheme absorbed the patients’ co-payments to induce them into accepting the prescriptions. Ron Hurtibise, sun-sentinel.com, 19 Mar. 2021 Wanda was introduced in Age of Ultron as someone with the power to induce nightmares in her enemies, among her other abilities. Alan Sepinwall, Rolling Stone, 5 Mar. 2021 Nowhere were the changes more pronounced than in sales, a profession that for generations relied on romancing clients with fancy dinners and golf outings to induce them to sign on the dotted line. Michael Litt, Forbes, 3 Mar. 2021 As the paranoid Lise grows convinced that her husband is plotting to induce her to commit suicide, the voices ratchet up, accusing her of various offenses: of being an inattentive wife, an inconstant mother, a solipsistic writer. New York Times, 26 Jan. 2021

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'induce.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of induce

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

History and Etymology for induce

Middle English, from Anglo-French inducer, from Latin inducere, from in- + ducere to lead — more at tow entry 1

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Learn More About induce

Time Traveler for induce

Time Traveler

The first known use of induce was in the 14th century

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Statistics for induce

Last Updated

20 Jul 2021

Cite this Entry

“Induce.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/induce. Accessed 26 Jul. 2021.

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More Definitions for induce

induce

verb

English Language Learners Definition of induce

somewhat formal : to cause (someone or something) to do something
: to cause (something) to happen or exist
medical : to give (a pregnant woman) special medicine in order to make her give birth : to cause (labor or birth) to begin by giving special drugs to a pregnant woman

induce

verb
in·​duce | \ in-ˈdüs How to pronounce induce (audio) , -ˈdyüs \
induced; inducing

Kids Definition of induce

1 : to cause to do something Her pleas induced us to give.
2 : to bring about Warm milk induces sleepiness.
3 : to produce (as an electric current) by induction

induce

transitive verb
in·​duce | \ in-ˈd(y)üs How to pronounce induce (audio) \
induced; inducing

Medical Definition of induce

1 : to cause or bring about anesthesia induced by drugs : as
a(1) : to cause the embryological formation of the optic cup induces lens tissue in the adjacent ectoderm
(2) : to cause to form through embryonic induction induce ectoderm to form a neural tube
b : to cause or initiate by artificial means induced abortion induced labor
2 : to produce anesthesia in the patient was induced by a mixture of thiopental and curare

More from Merriam-Webster on induce

Nglish: Translation of induce for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of induce for Arabic Speakers

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