incline

verb
in·​cline | \ in-ˈklīn How to pronounce incline (audio) \
inclined; inclining

Definition of incline

 (Entry 1 of 2)

intransitive verb

1 : to bend the head or body forward : bow
2 : to lean, tend, or become drawn toward an opinion or course of conduct
3 : to deviate from a line, direction, or course specifically : to deviate from the vertical or horizontal

transitive verb

1 : to cause to stoop or bow : bend
2 : to have influence on : persuade his love of books inclined him toward a literary career
3 : to give a bend or slant to

incline

noun
in·​cline | \ ˈin-ˌklīn How to pronounce incline (audio) \

Definition of incline (Entry 2 of 2)

: an inclined plane : grade, slope

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Other Words from incline

Verb

incliner noun

Choose the Right Synonym for incline

Verb

incline, bias, dispose, predispose mean to influence one to have or take an attitude toward something. incline implies a tendency to favor one of two or more actions or conclusions. I incline to agree bias suggests a settled and predictable leaning in one direction and connotes unfair prejudice. the experience biased him against foreigners dispose suggests an affecting of one's mood or temper so as to incline one toward something. her nature disposes her to trust others predispose implies the operation of a disposing influence well in advance of the opportunity to manifest itself. does fictional violence predispose them to accept real violence?

Examples of incline in a Sentence

Verb She listened with her eyes closed and her head inclined. The road inclines at an angle of about 12 degrees. His love of books inclined him toward a literary career. Noun We drove up a steep incline to the summit. You can adjust the incline of the ramp.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Verb Dorador thought telling people about the diverse ecology would incline others to protect the area. Ian Morse, Quartz, "Chile’s new constitution could rewrite the story of lithium mining," 22 Dec. 2020 Someone who grasps it lightly might incline a little more toward risk-taking than caution in her personal choices. Dhruv Khullar, The New Yorker, "How Trump Became the Pro-Infection Candidate," 23 Oct. 2020 Today, no one suspects that Italy was terrorized by COVID19 because Italian genes incline the population to respiratory illness. Jennifer Tsai, Scientific American, "COVID-19’s Disparate Impacts Are Not a Story about Race," 8 Sep. 2020 Each will likely command top of the market salaries, and the Colts will be inclined to pay up for two of their best players and locker room leaders. Jim Ayello, The Indianapolis Star, "Insider: Big-name Colts headed into contract seasons. Who will be back?," 2 June 2020 In mid-March, the work of the modelers inclined the governor and his aides to consider more extreme measures, even a shutdown. Joaquin Sapien, ProPublica, "Two Coasts. One Virus. How New York Suffered Nearly 10 Times the Number of Deaths as California.," 16 May 2020 For those inclined, the current market dip could present an opportune moment to scoop up emerging market assets at more attractive valuations, according to a UBS Asset Management report this week. Anne Sraders, Fortune, "Coronavirus fears send markets plunging, erasing the Dow’s gains for the year," 1 Feb. 2020 From here, the Aventine inclines up, overlooking the Circus Maximus. Washington Post, "Rome’s seven hills offer seven green respites from summer’s crowds," 12 July 2019 This treadmill has a 22-by-60-inch running path that inclines up to 15 percent. Popular Science, "Treadmills for an effective workout at home," 22 May 2020 Recent Examples on the Web: Noun The spread of the virus is at its highest point since the pandemic began, with cases and hospitalizations around the country on an uncontrolled incline. Rachel Leingang, The Arizona Republic, "Rudy Barron, 65-year-old first-time voter featured in Republic article, dies of COVID-19," 3 Dec. 2020 There’s no hurdle too major, no incline too steep for the duo’s fervent endearment. Carlos Aguilar, Los Angeles Times, "Review: Is ‘The Climb’ the greatest bromantic comedy ever?," 11 Nov. 2020 But in addition to the solid performance throughout the power curve, hill climbing — tested on a long, steep incline — is also a breeze in the Encore GX. Tribune News Service, cleveland, "Buick Encore GX: Bigger and stronger, but is it really much better?," 31 Oct. 2020 These include pin acquisition technology for easily locking on to a golf pin from hundreds of yards away, slope compensating features to measure incline/decline angles and the ability to operate in very hot temperatures. The Editors, Field & Stream, "Three Questions To Ask When Buying A Laser Rangefinder," 10 Nov. 2020 The men quickly drove down a steep incline to the fallen 1,400-pound animal. Brett Anderson, New York Times, "The Thanksgiving Myth Gets a Deeper Look This Year," 17 Nov. 2020 Candy chutes — long tubes that send candy down a banister or other incline to trick-or-treaters waiting at the bottom — have also been gaining traction after the idea went viral on Facebook. Samantha Davenport, Anchorage Daily News, "With Halloween traditions riskier this year, Alaskans look for creative ways to celebrate the season," 27 Oct. 2020 Jennifer Chaillie, 38, was racing down the incline in the Ability360 parking garage in her wheelchair. Brieanna J. Frank, The Arizona Republic, "When Phoenix gym for people with disabilities closed, they saw another chance to adapt," 1 Nov. 2020 Your can falls on the conveyor belt and rises up an incline to the place where sorters stand, picking out objects that don’t belong. London Gibson, The Indianapolis Star, "Scrub Hub: Where does my recycling go after it's picked up from the curb?," 20 Oct. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'incline.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of incline

Verb

14th century, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense 1

Noun

1798, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for incline

Verb

Middle English, from Anglo-French incliner, encliner, from Latin inclinare, from in- + clinare to lean — more at lean

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Time Traveler for incline

Time Traveler

The first known use of incline was in the 14th century

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Statistics for incline

Last Updated

28 Dec 2020

Cite this Entry

“Incline.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/incline. Accessed 15 Jan. 2021.

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More Definitions for incline

incline

verb
How to pronounce incline (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of incline

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to bend forward or to cause (something) to bend forward
: to lean or slope
formal : to cause (someone) to want to do something or to be likely to do something

incline

noun
How to pronounce incline (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of incline (Entry 2 of 2)

: a slanting surface

incline

verb
in·​cline | \ in-ˈklīn How to pronounce incline (audio) \
inclined; inclining

Kids Definition of incline

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : to cause to bend or lean She inclined her head.

incline

noun
in·​cline | \ ˈin-ˌklīn How to pronounce incline (audio) \

Kids Definition of incline (Entry 2 of 2)

: slope entry 1 sense 2 a steep incline

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Comments on incline

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