incline

verb
in·cline | \in-ˈklīn \
inclined; inclining

Definition of incline 

(Entry 1 of 2)

intransitive verb

1 : to bend the head or body forward : bow

2 : to lean, tend, or become drawn toward an opinion or course of conduct

3 : to deviate from a line, direction, or course specifically : to deviate from the vertical or horizontal

transitive verb

1 : to cause to stoop or bow : bend

2 : to have influence on : persuade his love of books inclined him toward a literary career

3 : to give a bend or slant to

incline

noun
in·cline | \ˈin-ˌklīn \

Definition of incline (Entry 2 of 2)

: an inclined plane : grade, slope

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Other Words from incline

Verb

incliner noun

Choose the Right Synonym for incline

Verb

incline, bias, dispose, predispose mean to influence one to have or take an attitude toward something. incline implies a tendency to favor one of two or more actions or conclusions. I incline to agree bias suggests a settled and predictable leaning in one direction and connotes unfair prejudice. the experience biased him against foreigners dispose suggests an affecting of one's mood or temper so as to incline one toward something. her nature disposes her to trust others predispose implies the operation of a disposing influence well in advance of the opportunity to manifest itself. does fictional violence predispose them to accept real violence?

Examples of incline in a Sentence

Verb

She listened with her eyes closed and her head inclined. The road inclines at an angle of about 12 degrees. His love of books inclined him toward a literary career.

Noun

We drove up a steep incline to the summit. You can adjust the incline of the ramp.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

And, although the Reds hardly regret recruiting the crafty Egyptian instead, they could be inclined to re-enter negotiations given the player's availability. SI.com, "Liverpool on Alert as Highly-Rated Portugal International Officially Leaves Sporting CP," 15 June 2018 China, North Korea’s main trading partner, is going to laud the nuclear test site demolition and could be inclined to ease enforcement of economic sanctions, Acton said, noting reports that North Korean trade with China had restarted already. Washington Post, "Analysis: Has Trump blown chances for talks with NKorea?," 26 May 2018 Avery leaps around like a faun in floral dresses, creepily bending to desk level and inclining her head blankly. Josephine Livingstone, The New Republic, "Amy Schumer’s Head Injury," 20 Apr. 2018 The goal is to wear down citizens who were once inclined to protest, and to discourage investigative reporters that any investigations are futile because, in essence, nothing matters any more. Will Bunch, Philly.com, "The Year of ¯\_(ツ)_/¯: Why Trump Fatigue makes 2018 so dangerous | Will Bunch," 25 Jan. 2018 The descriptions of landscape are so beautifully rendered that I actually wasn’t inclined to skip them. WSJ, "Five Best: Lionel Shriver," 4 May 2018 Being musically inclined, Vivian loved to sing and play the piano. Orlando Sentinel, OrlandoSentinel.com, "Deaths in Central Florida: 4/19," 19 Apr. 2018 Our best deal of the year: Get a digital subscription to IndyStar for just $9.99 You might also be inclined to look for clues in Reich’s stint as offensive coordinator with the then-San Diego Chargers, who fired him after the 2015 season. Stephen Holder, Indianapolis Star, "Frank Reich's Colts offense to feature shotgun, no-huddle, run-pass options," 15 Feb. 2018 At $28, I am also inclined, since losing my umbrella in the back of a cab is pretty much guaranteed at least once during the wet season. Joyann King, Harper's BAZAAR, "Can You Be Chic & Carry An Umbrella?," 1 Apr. 2014

Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

Using the incline feature can help close that gap: Studies show that running on a 1% incline requires a similar amount of energy as running outdoors. NBC News, "What you need to know before running outdoors," 9 May 2018 In the end, Atlas was a big, wobbly humanoid that moved at a snail's pace and fell without warning, sometimes without much reason (a slight incline of a few degrees took down one). Erik Sofge, Popular Mechanics, "The Golden Age of Walking Bots That Never Arrived," 25 Mar. 2016 Like all ATVs for combat, the SHERP has been tested against steep inclines. Allison Barrie, Fox News, "Eurosatory 2018: Huge wheeled military ATV swims and surprises," 12 June 2018 Such systems are strongly front-biased and often pretty weak on snow and ice surfaces, especially starting off, especially on an incline. Dan Neil, WSJ, "2019 Subaru Ascent: A Bigger, Better Family SUV," 12 July 2018 The metal walkway with the eight-foot incline is flanked by warehouses and a floral arrangement of Allegheny serviceberry, eastern redbuds, wild ginger and magnolia trees. Andrea Sachs, chicagotribune.com, "Take a walk on New York's High Line from end-to-end," 2 July 2018 Cyclists should be prepared for steady inclines up to each of the tunnels, followed by declines after. Chelsey Lewis, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, "4 linked trails and 100 miles of biking bliss in western Wisconsin," 21 June 2018 The frame stands at a slight incline, which works the back legs, where many dogs have weakness, Lopez said. Rebekah L. Sanders, azcentral, "Doggy treadmills are a thing, and they're saving lives in Maricopa County," 25 May 2018 And to get up hills, Cincinnati had five inclines, including Mount Adams and Price Hill. Scott Wartman, Cincinnati.com, "The curse of the subway: A look at Cincinnati’s troubled century of mass transit," 25 Apr. 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'incline.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of incline

Verb

14th century, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense 1

Noun

1798, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for incline

Verb

Middle English, from Anglo-French incliner, encliner, from Latin inclinare, from in- + clinare to lean — more at lean

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Phrases Related to incline

so inclined

Statistics for incline

Last Updated

4 Oct 2018

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for incline

The first known use of incline was in the 14th century

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More Definitions for incline

incline

verb

English Language Learners Definition of incline

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to bend forward or to cause (something) to bend forward

: to lean or slope

: to cause (someone) to want to do something or to be likely to do something

incline

noun

English Language Learners Definition of incline (Entry 2 of 2)

: a slanting surface

incline

verb
in·cline | \in-ˈklīn \
inclined; inclining

Kids Definition of incline

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : to cause to bend or lean She inclined her head.

incline

noun
in·cline | \ˈin-ˌklīn \

Kids Definition of incline (Entry 2 of 2)

: slope entry 1 sense 2 a steep incline

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Comments on incline

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