implacable

adjective
im·​pla·​ca·​ble | \ (ˌ)im-ˈpla-kə-bəl How to pronounce implacable (audio) , -ˈplā- How to pronounce implacable (audio) \

Definition of implacable

: not placable : not capable of being appeased, significantly changed, or mitigated an implacable enemy

Keep scrolling for more

Other Words from implacable

implacability \ (ˌ)im-​ˌpla-​kə-​ˈbi-​lə-​tē How to pronounce implacability (audio) , -​ˌplā-​ \ noun
implacably \ (ˌ)im-​ˈpla-​kə-​blē How to pronounce implacably (audio) , -​ˈplā-​ \ adverb

How Should You Use implacable?

Implacable is based on the Latin verb placare, meaning "to calm" or "to soothe." It joins the negative im- to the root to describe something that cannot be calmed or soothed or altered. The root placare also gave us placate. You may ask, what about the similar-looking words placid and placebo? These words are related to implacable and placate, but not as closely as you might suspect. They come from the Latin verb placēre, a relative of placare that means "to please."

Examples of implacable in a Sentence

He has an implacable hatred for his political opponents. an implacable judge who knew in his bones that the cover-up extended to the highest levels of government

Recent Examples on the Web

And that might not be for some time, because of the other advantage partisanship affords him—the implacable support of his party. The Economist, "LexingtonPast episodes of presidential wrongdoing have provoked a reaction," 24 Feb. 2018 In the second year of the Bush presidency, responding to implacable pressures from the Reagan and Bush administrations, the Soviet Union imploded. Maggie Maloney, Town & Country, "Read Brian Mulroney's Moving Eulogy at George H.W. Bush's Funeral," 5 Dec. 2018 In the second year of the Bush presidency, responding to implacable pressures from the Reagan and Bush administrations, the Soviet Union imploded. WSJ, "Remarks by Speakers at Funeral for George H.W. Bush," 5 Dec. 2018 But with parliament deadlocked and the E.U. implacable, a simple solution could present itself as the only way out for a Tory party desperate to keep Labour out of power: the transition period could be extended, and a second referendum called. Andrew Sullivan, Daily Intelligencer, "Did Trump Just Help Stop Brexit?," 13 July 2018 The lack of normal optical recession gives them an implacable, almost physical presence, especially the really tall cathedrals of Wells, Somerset, England; Orléans, France; or Nuremberg, Germany. Roberta Smith, New York Times, "Viewing Europe’s Houses of Worship in Wild Detail," 4 Apr. 2018 Even when chaos and privation seem implacable, the human drive for dignity and validation abides. Erika P. Rodriguez, Smithsonian, "Photo of the day," 27 June 2018 By 1985, in one of the crueler ironies of the century, gay men had learned that the liberation of the libido, the casting-off of eons-old shame, had exposed them to an implacable, hitherto unknown virus. Michael Cunningham, New York Times, "Surviving AIDS, but at What Cost?," 25 June 2018 Among those involved in the movement to address Spain’s legacy of silence, Cantera gained a reputation as an implacable opponent. Matías Costa, Smithsonian, "The Battle Over the Memory of the Spanish Civil War," 28 June 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'implacable.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

See More

First Known Use of implacable

15th century, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for implacable

Middle English, from Latin implacabilis, from in- + placabilis placable

Keep scrolling for more

Learn More about implacable

Share implacable

Listen to Our Podcast about implacable

Dictionary Entries near implacable

impish

impiteous

impl

implacable

implacement

implant

implantation

Statistics for implacable

Last Updated

28 Jan 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for implacable

The first known use of implacable was in the 15th century

See more words from the same century

Keep scrolling for more

More Definitions for implacable

implacable

adjective

English Language Learners Definition of implacable

: opposed to someone or something in a very angry or determined way that cannot be changed

implacable

adjective
im·​pla·​ca·​ble | \ im-ˈpla-kə-bəl How to pronounce implacable (audio) , -ˈplā-\

Kids Definition of implacable

: impossible to please, satisfy, or change implacable enemies

Keep scrolling for more

Comments on implacable

What made you want to look up implacable? Please tell us where you read or heard it (including the quote, if possible).

WORD OF THE DAY

grandiloquent, ostentatious, or bombastic

Get Word of the Day daily email!

Test Your Vocabulary

Original Meanings Quiz

  • rembrandt-painting-a-young-scholar-and-his-tutor
  • Which of the following is the earliest known sense of the word awe?
True or False

Test your knowledge - and maybe learn something along the way.

TAKE THE QUIZ
SCRABBLE® Sprint

Test Your Knowledge - and learn some interesting things along the way.

TAKE THE QUIZ

Love words? Need even more definitions?

Subscribe to America's largest dictionary and get thousands more definitions and advanced search—ad free!