placate

verb
pla·​cate | \ ˈplā-ˌkāt How to pronounce placate (audio) , ˈpla- How to pronounce placate (audio) \
placated; placating

Definition of placate

transitive verb

: to soothe or mollify especially by concessions : appease

Other Words from placate

placater noun
placatingly \ ˈplā-​ˌkā-​tiŋ-​lē How to pronounce placate (audio) , ˈpla-​ \ adverb
placation \ plā-​ˈkā-​shən How to pronounce placate (audio) , pla-​ \ noun
placative \ ˈplā-​ˌkā-​tiv How to pronounce placate (audio) , ˈpla-​ \ adjective
placatory \ ˈplā-​kə-​ˌtȯr-​ē How to pronounce placate (audio) , ˈpla-​ \ adjective

Choose the Right Synonym for placate

pacify, appease, placate, mollify, propitiate, conciliate mean to ease the anger or disturbance of. pacify suggests a soothing or calming. pacified by a sincere apology appease implies quieting insistent demands by making concessions. appease their territorial ambitions placate suggests changing resentment or bitterness to goodwill. a move to placate local opposition mollify implies soothing hurt feelings or rising anger. a speech that mollified the demonstrators propitiate implies averting anger or malevolence especially of a superior being. propitiated his parents by dressing up conciliate suggests ending an estrangement by persuasion, concession, or settling of differences. conciliating the belligerent nations

Soothe Yourself With the History of Placate

The earliest documented uses of the verb placate in English date from the late 17th century. The word is derived from Latin placatus, the past participle of placare, and placate still carries the basic meaning of its Latin ancestor: "to soothe" or "to appease." Other placare descendants in English are implacable (meaning "not easily soothed or satisfied") and placation ("the act of soothing or appeasing"). Even please itself, derived from Latin placēre ("to please"), is a distant relative of placate.

Examples of placate in a Sentence

Although Rumsfeld was later thrown overboard by the Administration in an attempt to placate critics of the Iraq War, his military revolution was here to stay. — Jeremy Scahill, Nation, 2 Apr. 2007 The first step that women took in their emancipation was to adopt traditional male roles: to insist on their right to wear trousers, not to placate, not to smile, not to be decorative. — Fay Weldon, Harper's, May 1998 These spirits inhabited natural objects, like rivers and mountains, including celestial bodies, like the sun and moon. They had to be placated and their favors sought in order to ensure the fertility of the soil and the rotation of the seasons. — Stephen W. Hawking, A Brief History of Time, 1988 But it seems important to the Thunderbirds to make a big deal out of this; evidently it placates congressmen who don't think the Air Force should be in show biz. — Frank Deford, Sports Illustrated, 3 Aug. 1987 The administration placated protesters by agreeing to consider their demands. The angry customer was not placated by the clerk's apology. See More
Recent Examples on the Web It was viewed in part as an effort to placate fans who complained that the succession of guest hosts seemed like a publicity stunt and that the job was Richards’ all along. Lynn Elber, Chicago Tribune, 27 July 2022 The change has led to hasty rollouts that try to placate both the fossil fuel industry and environmentalists, but risk angering both. Jeff Stein, Anna Phillips, Anchorage Daily News, 13 July 2022 Wickremesinghe also offered to resign to quell growing unrest, but his offer did not placate irate protesters, who set his home ablaze. Hafeel Farisz, BostonGlobe.com, 11 July 2022 Earlier in the evening, Prime Minister Ranil Wickremesinghe had offered to resign to quell growing unrest, but his offer did not placate irate protesters who set his home ablaze. Niha Masih, Washington Post, 9 July 2022 Digital readouts on the available head-up display should placate them. Dan Carney, Ars Technica, 22 June 2022 For its first half, Ahn’s film bends over backward to placate to heterosexual viewers and is all the weaker for it. Robert Daniels, Los Angeles Times, 2 June 2022 The country sought to placate Moscow by not joining the alliance, but also built up its own military forces that would deter a Russian invasion. Sune Engel Rasmussen, WSJ, 22 May 2022 In an attempt to placate its fans, Audemars Piguet upped its production this year from 45,000 watches to 50,000. Paige Reddinger, Robb Report, 20 May 2022 See More

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'placate.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

First Known Use of placate

1678, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for placate

Latin placatus, past participle of placare — more at please

Learn More About placate

Time Traveler for placate

Time Traveler

The first known use of placate was in 1678

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Dictionary Entries Near placate

placard

placate

placcate

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Statistics for placate

Last Updated

8 Aug 2022

Cite this Entry

“Placate.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/placate. Accessed 19 Aug. 2022.

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More Definitions for placate

placate

verb
pla·​cate | \ ˈplā-ˌkāt How to pronounce placate (audio) , ˈpla- \
placated; placating

Kids Definition of placate

: to calm the anger of The apology did little to placate customers.

More from Merriam-Webster on placate

Nglish: Translation of placate for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of placate for Arabic Speakers

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