implacable

adjective
im·​pla·​ca·​ble | \ (ˌ)im-ˈpla-kə-bəl How to pronounce implacable (audio) , -ˈplā- How to pronounce implacable (audio) \

Definition of implacable

: not placable : not capable of being appeased, significantly changed, or mitigated an implacable enemy

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Other Words from implacable

implacability \ (ˌ)im-​ˌpla-​kə-​ˈbi-​lə-​tē How to pronounce implacable (audio) , -​ˌplā-​ \ noun
implacably \ (ˌ)im-​ˈpla-​kə-​blē How to pronounce implacable (audio) , -​ˈplā-​ \ adverb

How Should You Use implacable?

Implacable is based on the Latin verb placare, meaning "to calm" or "to soothe." It joins the negative im- to the root to describe something that cannot be calmed or soothed or altered. The root placare also gave us placate. You may ask, what about the similar-looking words placid and placebo? These words are related to implacable and placate, but not as closely as you might suspect. They come from the Latin verb placēre, a relative of placare that means "to please."

Examples of implacable in a Sentence

He has an implacable hatred for his political opponents. an implacable judge who knew in his bones that the cover-up extended to the highest levels of government
Recent Examples on the Web Despite all the differences of style and historical context, the implacable force of nature comes through in both works — a reminder of the smallness and weakness of human beings when measured against it. Benjamin Lima, Dallas News, "‘To Be Determined’ at the Dallas Museum of Art explores hope and resilience in these troubled times," 23 Dec. 2020 Solitude—existential and seemingly implacable—provides the film’s theme; the urgent human need to break out of it provides the action. Joe Morgenstern, WSJ, "‘The Midnight Sky’ Review: Reaching Out in the Void," 10 Dec. 2020 Those tactics, which helped turn those countries into implacable adversaries, seem to have fallen out of fashion in the Kremlin, which analysts say is increasingly applying a more subtle blend of soft and hard power. New York Times, "In Nagorno-Karabakh Peace Deal, Putin Applied a Deft New Touch," 1 Dec. 2020 Obama only foreshadows Trump’s unlikely ascent by registering his concerns about rising nativism and the tribalism his election seemed to unleash, an implacable opposition party and conservative media increasingly untethered to truth. Dallas News, "Barack Obama’s memoir is a masterful lament over the fragility of hope," 18 Nov. 2020 With help from the screenplay by Jane Goldman, Joe Shrapnel and Anna Waterhouse, Ms. Scott Thomas makes Danvers as sympathetic as the housekeeper’s implacable hostility to the new Mrs. De Winter will allow. Joe Morgenstern, WSJ, "‘Rebecca’ Review: Off the Road to Manderley," 22 Oct. 2020 Obama only foreshadows Trump’s unlikely ascent by registering his concerns about rising nativism and the tribalism his election seemed to unleash, an implacable opposition party and conservative media increasingly untethered to truth. Dallas News, "Barack Obama’s memoir is a masterful lament over the fragility of hope," 18 Nov. 2020 Obama only foreshadows Trump’s unlikely ascent by registering his concerns about rising nativism and the tribalism his election seemed to unleash, an implacable opposition party and conservative media increasingly untethered to truth. Dallas News, "Barack Obama’s memoir is a masterful lament over the fragility of hope," 18 Nov. 2020 Durkin is keenly alert to its cold, hard, implacable tones, which run throughout the drama, dominating the action even in between the florid odes to wanting, getting, having, and spending that its human protagonists deftly and passionately deliver. Richard Brody, The New Yorker, "“The Nest,” Reviewed: Jude Law Plays a Banker Who Buys Into Money’s Lies," 17 Nov. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'implacable.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of implacable

15th century, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for implacable

Middle English, from Latin implacabilis, from in- + placabilis placable

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The first known use of implacable was in the 15th century

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Last Updated

29 Dec 2020

Cite this Entry

“Implacable.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/implacable. Accessed 20 Jan. 2021.

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More Definitions for implacable

implacable

adjective
How to pronounce implacable (audio) How to pronounce implacable (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of implacable

: opposed to someone or something in a very angry or determined way that cannot be changed

implacable

adjective
im·​pla·​ca·​ble | \ im-ˈpla-kə-bəl How to pronounce implacable (audio) , -ˈplā- \

Kids Definition of implacable

: impossible to please, satisfy, or change implacable enemies

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Comments on implacable

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