hereafter

adverb
here·​af·​ter | \ hir-ˈaf-tər How to pronounce hereafter (audio) \

Definition of hereafter

 (Entry 1 of 3)

1 : after this in sequence or in time
2 : in some future time or state

hereafter

noun, often capitalized

Definition of hereafter (Entry 2 of 3)

1 : future
2 : an existence beyond earthly life belief in the hereafter

hereafter

adjective

Definition of hereafter (Entry 3 of 3)

archaic
: future

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Synonyms & Antonyms for hereafter

Synonyms: Adverb

Synonyms: Noun

Antonyms: Noun

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Examples of hereafter in a Sentence

Adverb Hereafter the two companies will operate in full partnership. We don't know what will happen hereafter. Noun apologized, for being late to the meeting and assured his boss that there would be no such recurrences in the hereafter hoped to be reunited with his deceased wife in the hereafter
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Recent Examples on the Web: Adverb And now for some bad news: Aside from an occasional episode shared out of the goodness of my heart, Plaintext will hereafter be available only for subscribers. Steven Levy, Wired, "Alphabet Pops Loon’s Balloons—but Won't Call It a Failure," 21 Jan. 2021 The Washington Team – hereafter known in This Space as the Teamskins – already have started 3 QBs this season. Paul Daugherty, The Enquirer, "Doc's Morning Line: It's time for us to be the people we think we are," 19 Nov. 2020 Saying that to them out loud, and thanking them, would be a fitting end bracket to this period — and a start to your seeing their choices hereafter as standing up for themselves. Washington Post, "Carolyn Hax: Grown sons don’t want anything to do with dad who deserted them," 11 Sep. 2020 There is scarcely any part of my conduct which may not hereafter be drawn into precedent. William Anthony Hay, WSJ, "‘The Cabinet’ Review: Advise and Dissent," 15 Apr. 2020 According to Mitchell, Wray, and Watts (hereafter MW&W), the standard approach, which relates the present value of tax revenue to the present value of government spending and the government debt, is misleading. WSJ, "Notable & Quotable: Gregory Mankiw on Modern Monetary Theory," 14 Jan. 2020 The detective won’t forget, not on any Christmas Eve hereafter, his awful duty to carry out a little body as evidence of a felony. Tim Prudente, baltimoresun.com, "Speaking for baby Rose: How a Baltimore detective found his purpose investigating child abuse," 6 June 2019 But for some reason, the 25th wing (hereafter, The Phantom Wing) costs only 55 cents. Russell Brandom, The Verge, "The true madness of a viral wing pricing scheme," 28 Oct. 2018 In a special exhibition entitled hereafter, the world’s changing ecosystem is examined in the context of its effect on the living environment. Grace Dickinson, Philly.com, "Philadelphia Flower Show plagued with a history of wet, inclement weather," 2 Mar. 2018 Recent Examples on the Web: Noun No more merchants or clerks are wanted; and of those who come hereafter, nine-tenths will go back disappointed or impoverished, or stay here paupers. Michael Hiltzik, Los Angeles Times, "Column: California isn’t ‘hemorrhaging’ people, but there are reasons for concern," 24 Dec. 2020 Awakening on the escalator to the hereafter, Joe makes a desperate break to go back, leading to a fairly amusing tour of what the great beyond might resemble. Brian Lowry, CNN, "'Soul' rivals the Pixar classics but might aim too high for the kids," 24 Dec. 2020 There’s also the sobering fact that the daily COVID-19 death counts in the news make people think about the hereafter. Julie Washington, cleveland, "‘We created an oasis:’ Black churches evolve to offer support, reliable coronavirus information during pandemic," 10 Sep. 2020 To those raised in religious traditions, Christian or otherwise, the most obvious explanation is that they were granted a vision of heaven or hell, of what awaits them in the hereafter. Christof Koch, Scientific American, "What Near-Death Experiences Reveal about the Brain," 19 May 2020 The peacemakers may well be blessed in the hereafter, but in the earthly realm they are treated as badly as the poor and the meek. Garry Kasparov, The New York Review of Books, "A Popular Front to Stop Trump," 28 Jan. 2020 The open-ended ending is great, as is Stewart’s haunting exploration of a woman caught between the right here and the hereafter. Brian Truitt, USA TODAY, "The 10 best Kristen Stewart films, ranked (including 'Underwater' but not 'Twilight')," 9 Jan. 2020 The common people or souls of heaven resided eternally in the suburbs away from the main drag of the hereafter. Mike Lynch, Twin Cities, "Mike Lynch: Heavenly Halloween hauntings," 27 Oct. 2019 The gift speaks volumes about the benefits that big donors receive from their philanthropy, both in this life and the hereafter, and about the economics of billionaire philanthropy itself. Michael Hiltzik, Los Angeles Times, "Column: Resnicks set a record with Caltech gift, but altruism isn’t the whole story," 1 Oct. 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'hereafter.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of hereafter

Adverb

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Noun

1546, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Adjective

1591, in the meaning defined above

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Time Traveler for hereafter

Time Traveler

The first known use of hereafter was before the 12th century

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Statistics for hereafter

Last Updated

31 Jan 2021

Cite this Entry

“Hereafter.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/hereafter. Accessed 4 Mar. 2021.

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More Definitions for hereafter

hereafter

adverb

English Language Learners Definition of hereafter

formal
: after this : from now on
: in a future time or state

hereafter

adverb
here·​af·​ter | \ hir-ˈaf-tər How to pronounce hereafter (audio) \

Kids Definition of hereafter

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : after this We will hereafter have a shorter recess.
2 : in some future time or state We can only guess what will happen hereafter.

hereafter

noun

Kids Definition of hereafter (Entry 2 of 2)

2 : life after death

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Comments on hereafter

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