harvest

noun, often attributive
har·​vest | \ ˈhär-vəst How to pronounce harvest (audio) \

Definition of harvest

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : the season for gathering in agricultural crops the beginning of the harvest
2 : the act or process of gathering in a crop assisting neighbors in their harvest
3a : a mature crop (as of grain or fruit) : yield bountiful harvests
b : the quantity of a natural product gathered in a single season the salmon harvest timber harvests
4 : an accumulated store or productive result a harvest of revenue

harvest

verb
harvested; harvesting; harvests

Definition of harvest (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

1a : to gather in (a crop) : reap harvesting corn
b : to gather, catch, hunt, or kill (salmon, oysters, deer, etc.) for human use, sport, or population control
c : to remove or extract (something, such as living cells, tissues, or organs) from culture (see culture entry 1 sense 3) or from a living or recently deceased body especially for transplanting
2a : to accumulate a store of has now harvested this new generation's scholarly labors— M. J. Wiener
b : to win by achievement the team harvested several awards

intransitive verb

: to gather in a crop especially for food sold it standing in the field to save himself the trouble of harvesting— Pearl Buck

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Other Words from harvest

Verb

harvestable \ ˈhär-​və-​stə-​bəl How to pronounce harvestable (audio) \ adjective
harvester noun

Synonyms for harvest

Synonyms: Noun

Synonyms: Verb

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Examples of harvest in a Sentence

Noun The beginning of the harvest varies from year to year. It is time for the harvest. They prayed for a bountiful harvest. We had enormous harvests of corn this year. Verb It is time to harvest the wheat. They want to harvest timber in these woods.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun Its farmers have rebelled, worried that losing any more water will rob them of a chance for a healthy harvest next year. Natalie Kitroeff, Star Tribune, "'This is a war': Cross-border fight over water erupts in Mexico," 17 Oct. 2020 Its farmers have rebelled, worried that losing any more water will rob them of a chance for a healthy harvest next year. Natalie Kitroeff, New York Times, "‘This Is a War’: Cross-Border Fight Over Water Erupts in Mexico," 14 Oct. 2020 The Illinois Farm Bureau reports the stretch of dry weather this fall has allowed farmers to get out in the fields for harvest. Kevin Bessler, Washington Examiner, "Illinois farmers in the midst of harvest," 13 Oct. 2020 Railroad feeder lines were built into the forests where sawmills had been set up for the harvest of the virgin pine. Rex Nelson, Arkansas Online, "OPINION | REX NELSON: The woods of Arkansas," 11 Oct. 2020 According to Fish and Game, that does not leave room for the harvest of any additional bull moose. John Schandelmeier, Anchorage Daily News, "There is much to consider when assessing supplemental moose hunts," 11 Oct. 2020 If the seam opens with gentle pressure, the pod is ready for harvest. cleveland, "‘Treat’ the monarch butterflies: You have until Halloween to drop off milkweed pods at the Cuyahoga Soil & Water Conservation District," 7 Oct. 2020 For example, French winemaker Pol Roger only releases their vintage Champagne in the best years for harvest in the eponymous region. Rachel King, Fortune, "Why right now is the time to start aging your wine collection," 4 Oct. 2020 Cropping involves just removing the lower, older leaves for harvest and leaving the rest of the plant to continue to grow and produce. Dan Gill, NOLA.com, "Make it a tasty fall by planting your own veggie garden with root crops, garlic and greens," 30 Sep. 2020 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb There, fourth-graders help plant everything in the spring and then harvest it all in the fall as fifth-graders — though not this year with the pandemic. Chris Riemenschneider, Star Tribune, "Minneapolis family's garden offers a musical respite during a difficult summer," 16 Oct. 2020 According to the latest U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Crop Production report, Illinois farmers are expected to harvest 615 million bushels this fall, up 16 percent from last year. Kevin Bessler, Washington Examiner, "Illinois farmers in the midst of harvest," 13 Oct. 2020 Many gardeners are reporting full stalks of bananas hopefully ready to harvest before the cooler fall and winter weather. Tom Maccubbin, orlandosentinel.com, "How and when to fertilize banana plantings," 10 Oct. 2020 In one lurid variation, Hollywood stars harvest the chemical adrenochrome from children’s bodies. Gilad Edelman, Wired, "QAnon Supporters Aren’t Quite Who You Think They Are," 6 Oct. 2020 In addition to existing ways to harvest energy, from radio waves, solar power and vibration, there are some in development that sound more sci-fi. Christopher Mims, WSJ, "Battery-Free, Energy-Harvesting Perpetual Machines: The Weird Future of Computing," 3 Oct. 2020 Sometimes garlic bulbs will be ready to harvest when the leaves are still green. oregonlive, "It’s time to plant garlic in Oregon; here’s what you need to know," 28 Sep. 2020 Without a crop to harvest, there was no reason to be on Howell Mountain. Tatiana Sanchez, SFChronicle.com, "Calistoga avoids disaster as winds ease, Glass Fire shifts eastward, but firefighters still on edge amid heat," 4 Oct. 2020 After retiring in 1992, Dr. Ashkin set up a lab in his basement in Rumson, N.J., and worked on ways to harvest solar energy more efficiently. James R. Hagerty, WSJ, "Arthur Ashkin Used Lasers to Trap Atoms and Cells," 2 Oct. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'harvest.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of harvest

Noun

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

15th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1a

History and Etymology for harvest

Noun and Verb

Middle English hervest, from Old English hærfest; akin to Latin carpere to pluck, gather, Greek karpos fruit

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Time Traveler for harvest

Time Traveler

The first known use of harvest was before the 12th century

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Statistics for harvest

Last Updated

20 Oct 2020

Cite this Entry

“Harvest.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/harvest. Accessed 29 Oct. 2020.

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More Definitions for harvest

harvest

noun
How to pronounce harvest (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of harvest

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: the season when crops are gathered from the fields or the activity of gathering crops
: the amount of crops that are gathered also : the amount of a natural product gathered in a single season

harvest

verb

English Language Learners Definition of harvest (Entry 2 of 2)

: to gather (a crop)
: to gather or collect (something) for use

harvest

noun
har·​vest | \ ˈhär-vəst How to pronounce harvest (audio) \

Kids Definition of harvest

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : the gathering of a crop
2 : the season when crops are gathered
3 : a ripe crop They passed miles of naked grapevines, stripped of their harvest— Pam Muñoz Ryan, Esperanza Rising

harvest

verb
harvested; harvesting

Kids Definition of harvest (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : to gather in a crop
2 : to gather or collect for use harvest timber

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Comments on harvest

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