gossip

noun
gos·​sip | \ ˈgä-səp How to pronounce gossip (audio) \

Definition of gossip

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1a dialectal British : godparent
c : a person who habitually reveals personal or sensational facts about others the worst gossip in town
2a : rumor or report of an intimate nature spreading gossip about their divorce
b : a chatty talk
c : the subject matter of gossip Their breakup was common gossip.

gossip

verb
gossiped; gossiping; gossips

Definition of gossip (Entry 2 of 2)

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Other Words from gossip

Noun

gossipry \ ˈgä-​sə-​prē How to pronounce gossipry (audio) \ noun

Verb

gossiper noun

Did You Know?

Old English sibb, meaning “relative” or “kinsman,” came from the adjective sibb, “related by blood” (the ancestor of modern English sibling). Old English godsibb was a person spiritually related to another, specifically by being a sponsor at baptism. Today we call such a person a godparent. Over the centuries, godsibb changed both in form and in meaning. Middle English gossib came to be used for a close friend or crony as well as for a godparent. From there it was only a short step to the gossip of today, a person no longer necessarily friend, relative, or sponsor, but someone filled with irresistible tidbits of rumor.

Examples of gossip in a Sentence

Noun He had been spreading gossip about his coworkers. the latest news and gossip from the entertainment industry She writes a gossip column in the paper. I like having a good gossip now and then. Verb They spent the afternoon gossiping on the phone. They often gossip with each other about their neighbors.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun The hot gossip could fill a page or two, compared to the reams for Taylor Swift or Lady Gaga or Katy Perry. Mikael Wood, chicagotribune.com, "Review: Dua Lipa, with some help and inspiration from Madonna, revives the remix album," 28 Aug. 2020 One of the lesser casualties of the coronavirus pandemic is gossip. Sadie Dingfelder, Washington Post, "During the pandemic, the popularity of birdwatching is soaring. Here’s what you need to know to tune in to the feathered soap opera outside your window.," 26 Aug. 2020 Even though the lyrics don’t completely make sense to us, Gaga has shared that the song is about gossip. James Barrett, Redbook, "Hit Songs With Lyrics That Just Don't Make Sense," 24 Aug. 2020 Samuels claimed that former Housewife Charrisse Jackson-Jordan was behind the gossip. Jodi Guglielmi, PEOPLE.com, "RHOP's Monique Samuels Opens Up About the ‘Disgusting' Rumors Spread About Her Marriage," 14 Aug. 2020 Perhaps voters didn’t hear the gossip in political circles about what was said to be a hot and heavy premarital affair. Arkansas Online, "OPINION: Poll power," 9 Aug. 2020 Did distractions, disruptions, and gossip shape Tolstoy’s novel as much as long-simmering ideas about morality and desire? Jennifer Wilson, The New Republic, "The Everyday Inspiration for Anna Karenina," 19 Aug. 2020 The Coen Brothers lovingly send up everyone from famous gossip columnist Louella Parsons to bathing beauty Esther Williams. Maureen Lee Lenker, EW.com, "The best comedies to watch on Netflix right now," 13 Aug. 2020 That should tide you over to the next occasion for some more Bronco gossip. Ezra Dyer, Car and Driver, "Ford Shows 4 Bronco Adventure Concepts for the SUV's Birthday," 13 Aug. 2020 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb On a particularly scenic hill, which overlooks the London Zoo and, in the distance, the empty city center, teen-agers like to smoke and gossip and hug; their relief at seeing one another is palpable. Anna Russell, The New Yorker, "The Laughing-Gas Wars of London," 4 Aug. 2020 From tabloids to celebrity magazines to gossip sites, the drama industry’s basic interests and business model haven’t changed much since. Cecilia D'anastasio, Wired, "#PokimaneBoyfriend and the Scandalous Reign of Drama YouTube," 31 July 2020 Meeting digitally in real time to gossip, joke, and share a meal over a videocall will light up the same endorphin pathways as a night out with friends. Rebecca Renner, National Geographic, "Why some people can't resist crowds despite the pandemic," 24 June 2020 The three women oftenate lunch together, gossiped together and waded through pregnancy together. Maggie Menderski, The Courier-Journal, "These 64-year-old Louisville natives are finally celebrating their 'Sweet 16' on Leap Day," 25 Feb. 2020 The doors would swing open to reveal a cast of regular customers, gossiping and sipping on cocktails, letting down their hair before their styling appointments began. Ikya Kandula, SFChronicle.com, "Black salons seemed recession proof. They’re not pandemic proof.," 1 May 2020 Funny animations show gorillas munching on leaves while gossiping about their encounter with the pith-helmeted explorer. New York Times, "Don’t Try to Catch a Komodo Dragon — Unless You’re David Attenborough," 29 May 2018 Stacks of chairs, absent of tourists and gossiping locals made for a forlorn scene. NBC News, "'It's silent outside': Italy, France and Spain adapt to life under coronavirus lockdown," 16 Mar. 2020 Yet, nearly three quarters of white-collar workers admitted to gossiping in the office. NBC News, "4 realistic ways to avoid the gossip trap at work," 24 Oct. 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'gossip.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of gossip

Noun

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Verb

1627, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for gossip

Noun and Verb

Middle English gossib, from Old English godsibb, from god god + sibb kinsman, from sibb related — more at sib

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Time Traveler for gossip

Time Traveler

The first known use of gossip was before the 12th century

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Statistics for gossip

Last Updated

14 Sep 2020

Cite this Entry

“Gossip.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/gossip. Accessed 24 Sep. 2020.

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More Definitions for gossip

gossip

noun
How to pronounce gossip (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of gossip

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: information about the behavior and personal lives of other people
: information about the lives of famous people
: a person who often talks about the private details of other people's lives

gossip

verb

English Language Learners Definition of gossip (Entry 2 of 2)

: to talk about the personal lives of other people

gossip

noun
gos·​sip | \ ˈgä-səp How to pronounce gossip (audio) \

Kids Definition of gossip

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : a person who repeats stories about other people
2 : talk or rumors involving the personal lives of other people

gossip

verb
gossiped; gossiping

Kids Definition of gossip (Entry 2 of 2)

: to talk about the personal lives of other people

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Comments on gossip

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