gossip

noun
gos·sip | \ ˈgä-səp \

Definition of gossip 

(Entry 1 of 2)

1a dialectal British : godparent

b : companion, crony

c : a person who habitually reveals personal or sensational facts about others the worst gossip in town

2a : rumor or report of an intimate nature spreading gossip about their divorce

b : a chatty talk

c : the subject matter of gossip Their breakup was common gossip.

gossip

verb
gossiped; gossiping; gossips

Definition of gossip (Entry 2 of 2)

intransitive verb

: to relate gossip (see gossip entry 1 sense 2a)

Keep scrolling for more

Other words from gossip

Noun

gossipry \ˈgä-sə-prē \ noun

Verb

gossiper noun

Did You Know?

Old English sibb, meaning “relative” or “kinsman,” came from the adjective sibb, “related by blood” (the ancestor of modern English sibling). Old English godsibb was a person spiritually related to another, specifically by being a sponsor at baptism. Today we call such a person a godparent. Over the centuries, godsibb changed both in form and in meaning. Middle English gossib came to be used for a close friend or crony as well as for a godparent. From there it was only a short step to the gossip of today, a person no longer necessarily friend, relative, or sponsor, but someone filled with irresistible tidbits of rumor.

Examples of gossip in a Sentence

Noun

He had been spreading gossip about his coworkers. the latest news and gossip from the entertainment industry She writes a gossip column in the paper. I like having a good gossip now and then.

Verb

They spent the afternoon gossiping on the phone. They often gossip with each other about their neighbors.
See More

Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

The Liverpool gossip began earlier this summer when there was a clamour based on 'reports in Spain' that the Reds were prepared to spend around £150m on Asensio as part of plans to replace Philippe Coutinho after the Nabil Fekir deal fell through. SI.com, "Marco Asensio's Agent Makes Statement on Client's Future Amid Persistent Liverpool Links," 11 July 2018 Every time, the gossip churned: Was the foundation flawed? Lizzie Johnson, SFChronicle.com, "First person to rebuild after Wine Country fires finds frontier of hope," 30 June 2018 Instead of brushing off the hurtful (and truly ridiculous) comments, the gossip empowered Reinhart to clap back in the name of self-love. refinery29.com, "Lili Reinhart Responds To Pregnancy Rumors, Though She Shouldn't Have To," 29 May 2018 Myles Porter blames losing his re-election on the Jennifer Harris gossip. CBS News, "Unsolved murder case is the talk of small Texas town 16 years later," 19 May 2018 Gatsby, his parties and his mysterious wealth were the gossip of the hour. New York Times, "Notes From the Book Review Archives," 20 Apr. 2018 The 25-track double-album finds Drake slashing his way through the muddy waters of hip-hop gossip, baby mama drama, and his contentious feud with Pusha T. Rather than bluff and bluster, Drizzy aims and fires with bullets of candor. Carl Lamarre, Billboard, "DJ Premier on Making Drake's 'Sandra's Rose' & Their Unfinished Song 'Sail' With Rick Ross," 29 June 2018 Inept in discussions of homework and school, talk in the Ahluwalia home is filled with celebrity gossip, debates over political opinion, and revelations after reading pieces in our favorite Malcolm Gladwell book. Teen Vogue, "Sachin of Sachin & Babi in Conversation with His Daughter Rhea Ahluwalia," 15 June 2018 Stokoski, our guide, shares show gossip with us, such as the fact that Cynthia Nixon, who played Miranda and is now running for governor of New York, was also pregnant during the truncated season five that Parker was pregnant during. USA TODAY, "Sex and the City turns 20: Take a tour to visit all the main sights," 14 June 2018

Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

Its suspicions of George Papadopoulos were based on drunken gossip about Hillary’s emails when the whole world was gossiping about Hillary’s emails. Holman W. Jenkins, WSJ, "Clapper Disinformation Campaign," 29 May 2018 And Warren as a Boston aristocrat and a Brahmin considered this an indignity--to have his private life gossiped about in the tabloid press. Lillian Cunningham, Washington Post, "Episode 15 of the Constitutional podcast: ‘Privacy’," 15 Jan. 2018 That Republican leaders would either gossip or joke about Rohrabacher and Trump in the same breath indicated a deep concern about the man who — as none of them expected at the time — would go on to win the presidency. Jonathan Chait, Daily Intelligencer, "Will Trump Be Meeting With His Counterpart — Or His Handler?," 8 July 2018 Over cocktails, guests lingered over the rainbow chevron motifs and gossiped long into the night. Vogue, "It Brits Celebrated Mrs. Alice x Misela at Annabel’s," 4 July 2018 Still, in his hometown Kelly was in a protective dome, continuing to sell out shows and music while listeners gossiped and snickered in office breakrooms and over lunch. William Lee, chicagotribune.com, "R. Kelly's fall comes as Chicago, black women finally turn their back on star," 23 May 2018 The lawsuit even accuses people at her job of gossiping and making fun of her. Michael Harriot, The Root, "This White Woman’s Discrimination Lawsuit Against the Atlanta Hawks Feels Eerily Familiar," 21 Mar. 2018 Apparently, their relationship had been rumored among the students but not confirmed, which makes sense – teachers wouldn't typically gossip about their dating status with a group of 11-year-old students. Caralynn Lippo, Redbook, "Kids Go Wild After Their Elementary School Teachers Get Engaged In Front of Them," 1 Mar. 2017 Some examples of behaviors often outlined in this type of policy include yelling, belittling, excessive monitoring of an employee’s work, gossiping or spreading rumors, arbitrary punishment without cause, making threats, or intimidating others. Pattie Hunt Sinacole, BostonGlobe.com, "Don’t hide open work environment concerns," 17 Mar. 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'gossip.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

See More

First Known Use of gossip

Noun

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Verb

1627, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for gossip

Noun

Middle English gossib, from Old English godsibb, from god god + sibb kinsman, from sibb related — more at sib

Verb

see gossip entry 1

Keep scrolling for more

Learn More about gossip

Statistics for gossip

Last Updated

21 Sep 2018

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for gossip

The first known use of gossip was before the 12th century

See more words from the same century

Keep scrolling for more

More Definitions for gossip

gossip

noun

English Language Learners Definition of gossip

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: information about the behavior and personal lives of other people

: information about the lives of famous people

: a person who often talks about the private details of other people's lives

gossip

verb

English Language Learners Definition of gossip (Entry 2 of 2)

: to talk about the personal lives of other people

gossip

noun
gos·sip | \ ˈgä-səp \

Kids Definition of gossip

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : a person who repeats stories about other people

2 : talk or rumors involving the personal lives of other people

gossip

verb
gossiped; gossiping

Kids Definition of gossip (Entry 2 of 2)

: to talk about the personal lives of other people

Keep scrolling for more

More from Merriam-Webster on gossip

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for gossip

Spanish Central: Translation of gossip

Nglish: Translation of gossip for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of gossip for Arabic Speakers

Comments on gossip

What made you want to look up gossip? Please tell us where you read or heard it (including the quote, if possible).

WORD OF THE DAY

an open space surrounded by woods

Get Word of the Day daily email!

Test Your Vocabulary

Name that Food Quiz

True or False

Test your knowledge - and maybe learn something along the way.

TAKE THE QUIZ
Syn City

Test Your Knowledge - and learn some interesting things along the way.

TAKE THE QUIZ

Love words? Need even more definitions?

Subscribe to America's largest dictionary and get thousands more definitions and advanced search—ad free!