gossip

noun
gos·​sip | \ˈgä-səp \

Definition of gossip 

(Entry 1 of 2)

1a dialectal British : godparent

b : companion, crony

c : a person who habitually reveals personal or sensational facts about others the worst gossip in town

2a : rumor or report of an intimate nature spreading gossip about their divorce

b : a chatty talk

c : the subject matter of gossip Their breakup was common gossip.

gossip

verb
gossiped; gossiping; gossips

Definition of gossip (Entry 2 of 2)

intransitive verb

: to relate gossip (see gossip entry 1 sense 2a)

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Other Words from gossip

Noun

gossipry \ ˈgä-​sə-​prē \ noun

Verb

gossiper noun

Did You Know?

Old English sibb, meaning “relative” or “kinsman,” came from the adjective sibb, “related by blood” (the ancestor of modern English sibling). Old English godsibb was a person spiritually related to another, specifically by being a sponsor at baptism. Today we call such a person a godparent. Over the centuries, godsibb changed both in form and in meaning. Middle English gossib came to be used for a close friend or crony as well as for a godparent. From there it was only a short step to the gossip of today, a person no longer necessarily friend, relative, or sponsor, but someone filled with irresistible tidbits of rumor.

Examples of gossip in a Sentence

Noun

He had been spreading gossip about his coworkers. the latest news and gossip from the entertainment industry She writes a gossip column in the paper. I like having a good gossip now and then.

Verb

They spent the afternoon gossiping on the phone. They often gossip with each other about their neighbors.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

Ever-entertaining and perpetually dazzled by the new, Johnson couldn’t resist gossip, fast cars or elegant clothes. Brenda Cronin, WSJ, "‘Man in the Glass House’ Examines an Architect of the 20th Century," 3 Nov. 2018 The celebrity gossip site claimed McPhee was flaunting her engagement ring while on the Italian island of Capri, and was also allegedly showing off her rock to family and friends on FaceTime. Mariah Haas, Fox News, "David Foster breaks silence on engagement to Katharine McPhee: 'We're all happy'," 12 July 2018 But back to Grande: Earlier this month, gossip sites were reporting that the pop star was engaged to SNL star Pete Davidson. Patricia Hernandez, The Verge, "Did you hear Ariana Grande and Pete Davidson are engaged?," 26 June 2018 Billionaire Peter Thiel has agreed not to buy news and gossip site Gawker. Polina Marinova, Fortune, "Why Billionaire Peter Thiel Won’t Buy Gawker Media," 26 Apr. 2018 Instead gossip sites and celebrity news outlets are focusing on new video that seems to depict Thompson cheating on his pregnant girlfriend, Khloe Kardashian. Emily Bamforth, cleveland.com, "Cavs center Tristan Thompson, Khloe Kardashian cheating rumors set Cleveland buzzing," 12 Apr. 2018 Private Mediaset, citing gossip magazine Chi, said the accident occurred near Costa Corallina, in the province of Olbia. BostonGlobe.com, "George Clooney released after motorcycle crash in Italy," 10 July 2018 The bag could contain anything—a lucky gift of largesse, a biro, an apron, chilli sauce, a copy of next month’s gossip magazine. A.a. Gill, A-LIST, "Fraught, But It Counts," 4 July 2018 The actress and the musician first sparked gossip after being spotted on a mid-October sushi date in Los Angeles. Stephanie Petit, PEOPLE.com, "Chris Martin and Dakota Johnson 'Are Getting More Serious' As a Couple Says Source," 26 June 2018

Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

Scholars and actors comment on the plays’ love affairs and moral quandaries the way pop-culture pundits on the E! network might gossip about Justin Bieber. Don Steinberg, WSJ, "The Play’s the Thing in a New Season of ‘Shakespeare Uncovered’," 24 Sep. 2018 Its suspicions of George Papadopoulos were based on drunken gossip about Hillary’s emails when the whole world was gossiping about Hillary’s emails. Holman W. Jenkins, WSJ, "Clapper Disinformation Campaign," 29 May 2018 And Warren as a Boston aristocrat and a Brahmin considered this an indignity--to have his private life gossiped about in the tabloid press. Lillian Cunningham, Washington Post, "Episode 15 of the Constitutional podcast: ‘Privacy’," 15 Jan. 2018 That Republican leaders would either gossip or joke about Rohrabacher and Trump in the same breath indicated a deep concern about the man who — as none of them expected at the time — would go on to win the presidency. Jonathan Chait, Daily Intelligencer, "Will Trump Be Meeting With His Counterpart — Or His Handler?," 8 July 2018 Over cocktails, guests lingered over the rainbow chevron motifs and gossiped long into the night. Vogue, "It Brits Celebrated Mrs. Alice x Misela at Annabel’s," 4 July 2018 Still, in his hometown Kelly was in a protective dome, continuing to sell out shows and music while listeners gossiped and snickered in office breakrooms and over lunch. William Lee, chicagotribune.com, "R. Kelly's fall comes as Chicago, black women finally turn their back on star," 23 May 2018 The lawsuit even accuses people at her job of gossiping and making fun of her. Michael Harriot, The Root, "This White Woman’s Discrimination Lawsuit Against the Atlanta Hawks Feels Eerily Familiar," 21 Mar. 2018 Apparently, their relationship had been rumored among the students but not confirmed, which makes sense – teachers wouldn't typically gossip about their dating status with a group of 11-year-old students. Caralynn Lippo, Redbook, "Kids Go Wild After Their Elementary School Teachers Get Engaged In Front of Them," 1 Mar. 2017

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'gossip.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of gossip

Noun

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Verb

1627, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for gossip

Noun

Middle English gossib, from Old English godsibb, from god god + sibb kinsman, from sibb related — more at sib

Verb

see gossip entry 1

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Statistics for gossip

Last Updated

16 Nov 2018

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for gossip

The first known use of gossip was before the 12th century

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More Definitions for gossip

gossip

noun

English Language Learners Definition of gossip

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: information about the behavior and personal lives of other people

: information about the lives of famous people

: a person who often talks about the private details of other people's lives

gossip

verb

English Language Learners Definition of gossip (Entry 2 of 2)

: to talk about the personal lives of other people

gossip

noun
gos·​sip | \ˈgä-səp \

Kids Definition of gossip

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : a person who repeats stories about other people

2 : talk or rumors involving the personal lives of other people

gossip

verb
gossiped; gossiping

Kids Definition of gossip (Entry 2 of 2)

: to talk about the personal lives of other people

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More from Merriam-Webster on gossip

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for gossip

Spanish Central: Translation of gossip

Nglish: Translation of gossip for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of gossip for Arabic Speakers

Comments on gossip

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