gossip

noun
gos·​sip | \ ˈgä-səp How to pronounce gossip (audio) \

Definition of gossip

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1a dialectal British : godparent
c : a person who habitually reveals personal or sensational facts about others the worst gossip in town
2a : rumor or report of an intimate nature spreading gossip about their divorce
b : a chatty talk
c : the subject matter of gossip Their breakup was common gossip.

gossip

verb
gossiped; gossiping; gossips

Definition of gossip (Entry 2 of 2)

intransitive verb

: to relate gossip (see gossip entry 1 sense 2a)

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Other Words from gossip

Noun

gossipry \ ˈgä-​sə-​prē How to pronounce gossip (audio) \ noun

Verb

gossiper noun

Did You Know?

Old English sibb, meaning “relative” or “kinsman,” came from the adjective sibb, “related by blood” (the ancestor of modern English sibling). Old English godsibb was a person spiritually related to another, specifically by being a sponsor at baptism. Today we call such a person a godparent. Over the centuries, godsibb changed both in form and in meaning. Middle English gossib came to be used for a close friend or crony as well as for a godparent. From there it was only a short step to the gossip of today, a person no longer necessarily friend, relative, or sponsor, but someone filled with irresistible tidbits of rumor.

Examples of gossip in a Sentence

Noun He had been spreading gossip about his coworkers. the latest news and gossip from the entertainment industry She writes a gossip column in the paper. I like having a good gossip now and then. Verb They spent the afternoon gossiping on the phone. They often gossip with each other about their neighbors.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun And, face it, the gossip in the home office is subpar. Marni Jameson, orlandosentinel.com, "Home office: How to make working from home work," 26 Mar. 2021 Story was Kosner’s managing editor, a big job in those pre-internet days when the weekly magazine — fat with news and gossip and the latest on everything — helped set the agenda for the city every Monday. Wendy Goodman, Curbed, "Remembering Richard David Story, the Magazine Editor Who Ate the World Whole," 9 Mar. 2021 And Drop Inhibitions Aside from music creation and performance, Clubhouse is true to its name as a members-only locker room where the latest music news and gossip gets tossed around. Bill Hochberg, Forbes, "Clubhouse Is Fast Becoming A Music Mecca ... And A Hot Mess," 1 Mar. 2021 Because social media gossip is an icky ouroboros, the best tea on TikTok A-listers like Noah Beck is on YouTube, where paparazzo Fletcher Greene tracks their hijinks on his channel The Hollywood Fix (1.76M subscribers) like a modern Weegee. Horacio Silva, Town & Country, "Why the Political Memoir is the Year's Hottest Book Genre," 25 Feb. 2021 The latest news or gossip might keep you on your toes. Tribune Content Agency, oregonlive, "Horoscope for Jan. 10, 2021: Cancer, work smarter, not harder; Aquarius, chart a path," 10 Jan. 2021 Oh, my God, what if there was a world in which gossip could be so into ... . Erica Gonzales, Harper's BAZAAR, "Gossip Girl’s Emily Alyn Lind Is Preparing for the Madness," 12 Mar. 2021 Everyone shows up and is all aflutter over Page Six reporting the gossip from their weekend at Bolo's. Mary Sollosi, EW.com, "The Week in 'Wives: A RHOA harvest, RHOD homecoming, and RHONJ rumor," 12 Mar. 2021 Gomez has long grown bored by the ceaseless gossip surrounding her every celebrity interaction and as a result, leaves all social media for her team to manage these days. Los Angeles Times, "How Selena Gomez embraced her Mexican heritage as ‘a source of healing’," 11 Mar. 2021 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb Benefits include access to exclusive, if not suspiciously motivated, gossip about the beauty community and, in some cases, PR packages from Star’s cosmetics line. Daysia Tolentino, Vulture, "Terms of Service: Your Guide to the Lingo of TeaTube," 6 Mar. 2021 The rapid return to restaurants every time restrictions have been lifted attests to the desire for physical presence, as does the yearning among many employees for brainstorming and gossip around the office coffee maker. Greg Ip, WSJ, "Covid-19 Propelled Businesses Into the Future. Ready or Not.," 26 Dec. 2020 Dad liked to gossip with Mom about the women at the gym. Souvankham Thammavongsa, The New Yorker, "Good-Looking," 22 Feb. 2021 When the mood in the car shifts from rockin’ out to gossip, a sound system equipped with Harman’s newest software can adjust the volume of the stereo for you. Dan Carney And Stan Horaczek, Popular Science, "The best car and automotive technologies of 2020," 3 Dec. 2020 When the mood in the car shifts from rockin’ out to gossip, a sound system equipped with Harman’s newest software can adjust the volume of the stereo for you. Dan Carney And Stan Horaczek, Popular Science, "The best car and automotive technologies of 2020," 3 Dec. 2020 Anna and Victoria gossip about someone supposedly being a former escort. Lia Beck, refinery29.com, "The Bachelor Season 25, Episode 3 Recap: Sarah, Sarah, Sarah," 18 Jan. 2021 When the mood in the car shifts from rockin’ out to gossip, a sound system equipped with Harman’s newest software can adjust the volume of the stereo for you. Dan Carney And Stan Horaczek, Popular Science, "The best car and automotive technologies of 2020," 3 Dec. 2020 When the mood in the car shifts from rockin’ out to gossip, a sound system equipped with Harman’s newest software can adjust the volume of the stereo for you. Dan Carney And Stan Horaczek, Popular Science, "The best car and automotive technologies of 2020," 3 Dec. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'gossip.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of gossip

Noun

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Verb

1627, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for gossip

Noun and Verb

Middle English gossib, from Old English godsibb, from god god + sibb kinsman, from sibb related — more at sib

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Time Traveler for gossip

Time Traveler

The first known use of gossip was before the 12th century

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Statistics for gossip

Last Updated

31 Mar 2021

Cite this Entry

“Gossip.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/gossip. Accessed 10 Apr. 2021.

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More Definitions for gossip

gossip

noun

English Language Learners Definition of gossip

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: information about the behavior and personal lives of other people
: information about the lives of famous people
: a person who often talks about the private details of other people's lives

gossip

verb

English Language Learners Definition of gossip (Entry 2 of 2)

: to talk about the personal lives of other people

gossip

noun
gos·​sip | \ ˈgä-səp How to pronounce gossip (audio) \

Kids Definition of gossip

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : a person who repeats stories about other people
2 : talk or rumors involving the personal lives of other people

gossip

verb
gossiped; gossiping

Kids Definition of gossip (Entry 2 of 2)

: to talk about the personal lives of other people

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Comments on gossip

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