gossip

noun
gos·​sip | \ ˈgä-səp How to pronounce gossip (audio) \

Definition of gossip

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1a dialectal British : godparent
c : a person who habitually reveals personal or sensational facts about others the worst gossip in town
2a : rumor or report of an intimate nature spreading gossip about their divorce
b : a chatty talk
c : the subject matter of gossip Their breakup was common gossip.

gossip

verb
gossiped; gossiping; gossips

Definition of gossip (Entry 2 of 2)

intransitive verb

: to relate gossip (see gossip entry 1 sense 2a)

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Other Words from gossip

Noun

gossipry \ ˈgä-​sə-​prē How to pronounce gossipry (audio) \ noun

Verb

gossiper noun

Did You Know?

Old English sibb, meaning “relative” or “kinsman,” came from the adjective sibb, “related by blood” (the ancestor of modern English sibling). Old English godsibb was a person spiritually related to another, specifically by being a sponsor at baptism. Today we call such a person a godparent. Over the centuries, godsibb changed both in form and in meaning. Middle English gossib came to be used for a close friend or crony as well as for a godparent. From there it was only a short step to the gossip of today, a person no longer necessarily friend, relative, or sponsor, but someone filled with irresistible tidbits of rumor.

Examples of gossip in a Sentence

Noun

He had been spreading gossip about his coworkers. the latest news and gossip from the entertainment industry She writes a gossip column in the paper. I like having a good gossip now and then.

Verb

They spent the afternoon gossiping on the phone. They often gossip with each other about their neighbors.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

The seating arrangement had Twitter users speculating about possible tensions, but the Shayk's reaction to the duo's set just shut all of that gossip down. Erica Gonzales, Harper's BAZAAR, "Irina Shayk Reacted to Bradley Cooper and Lady Gaga's "Shallow" Performance in the Best Way," 25 Feb. 2019 Remember that the point is to own the narrative, so get your message out ahead of gossip and speculation. Elizabeth Bernstein, WSJ, "The Art of the Public Divorce Announcement," 11 Jan. 2019 There was a story last week, one that did originate from the murky world of Spanish gossip, suggesting that Real would ask United for Romelu Lukaku in the event that Ronaldo goes. SI.com, "Cristiano Ronaldo 'Determined to Leave' Real Madrid as Man Utd Speculation Builds Again," 25 June 2018 The couple’s squabbles divided supporters of Diana from a much smaller group of supporters of Charles, and provided the tabloid press with a rich (and sickening) diet of gossip. The Economist, "The monarchy is at its strongest in years, unlike the government," 19 May 2018 Largely because of the lack of a free and robust media, Pyongyang is a hotbed of gossip. Eric Talmadge, Fox News, "Ahead of Trump summit, Kim Jong Un crafts a careful message," 17 May 2018 Even celebrities get it, as evidenced by our lineup of gossip today. Allie Jones, The Cut, "Audrina Patridge Is Dating Ryan Cabrera Again!," 1 May 2018 Next, Ashley Bush spoke of her grandmother's love of gossip. Amber Elliott, Houston Chronicle, "The show goes on. 'Celebration of Reading' raises $2.4 million for Barbara Bush literacy foundation," 20 Apr. 2018 Magic Leap’s fate is more than simply a topic of tech gossip. Rob Wile, miamiherald, "There are 8 million reasons why you should care if Magic Leap succeeds | Miami Herald," 15 Mar. 2018

Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

People gossiped, and many thought Karl and I were, or had been, lovers. André Leon Talley, Vogue, "André Leon Talley Remembers Karl Lagerfeld," 19 Feb. 2019 Katie watched the Celtics more closely so she and Mike could gossip about the players and the trades. Kari Bornhorst Mchugh, BostonGlobe.com, "Why I’ll never forget my son’s nurses," 6 Feb. 2018 There is a small crowd of men gossiping and sipping coffee. Kyre Chenven, Condé Nast Traveler, "For Sardinia’s Wild Side, Head to Sulcis," 12 Oct. 2018 Perhaps the Tesla production line is so far behind schedule because workers spend their time day-trading the stock and gossiping about the latest price moves, in which case going private would solve the problem. James Mackintosh, WSJ, "Elon Musk’s Flawed Plan for Tesla Shareholders," 9 Aug. 2018 The evening ended with cocktails to celebrate the insightful day as people gossiped about the highlights and their favorite moments. Katie Knoll, Vogue, "A Force for Change: Vogue’s Forces of Fashion," 15 Oct. 2018 Greasing your scalp on the porch, pressing your bangs before church, gossiping in the salon while hot combs smoked the air—this was rich cultural stuff, a bonding experience. Tia Williams, Glamour, "Dear Black Moms, It's on Us to Dismantle What 'Good Hair' Means for Our Daughters," 24 Sep. 2018 Scholars and actors comment on the plays’ love affairs and moral quandaries the way pop-culture pundits on the E! network might gossip about Justin Bieber. Don Steinberg, WSJ, "The Play’s the Thing in a New Season of ‘Shakespeare Uncovered’," 24 Sep. 2018 Its suspicions of George Papadopoulos were based on drunken gossip about Hillary’s emails when the whole world was gossiping about Hillary’s emails. Holman W. Jenkins, WSJ, "Clapper Disinformation Campaign," 29 May 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'gossip.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of gossip

Noun

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Verb

1627, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for gossip

Noun and Verb

Middle English gossib, from Old English godsibb, from god god + sibb kinsman, from sibb related — more at sib

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Statistics for gossip

Last Updated

20 Apr 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for gossip

The first known use of gossip was before the 12th century

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More Definitions for gossip

gossip

noun

English Language Learners Definition of gossip

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: information about the behavior and personal lives of other people
: information about the lives of famous people
: a person who often talks about the private details of other people's lives

gossip

verb

English Language Learners Definition of gossip (Entry 2 of 2)

: to talk about the personal lives of other people

gossip

noun
gos·​sip | \ ˈgä-səp How to pronounce gossip (audio) \

Kids Definition of gossip

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : a person who repeats stories about other people
2 : talk or rumors involving the personal lives of other people

gossip

verb
gossiped; gossiping

Kids Definition of gossip (Entry 2 of 2)

: to talk about the personal lives of other people

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More from Merriam-Webster on gossip

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for gossip

Spanish Central: Translation of gossip

Nglish: Translation of gossip for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of gossip for Arabic Speakers

Comments on gossip

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