gossip

noun
gos·​sip | \ ˈgä-səp How to pronounce gossip (audio) \

Definition of gossip

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1a dialectal British : godparent
c : a person who habitually reveals personal or sensational facts about others the worst gossip in town
2a : rumor or report of an intimate nature spreading gossip about their divorce
b : a chatty talk
c : the subject matter of gossip Their breakup was common gossip.

gossip

verb
gossiped; gossiping; gossips

Definition of gossip (Entry 2 of 2)

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Other Words from gossip

Noun

gossipry \ ˈgä-​sə-​prē How to pronounce gossipry (audio) \ noun

Verb

gossiper noun

Did You Know?

Old English sibb, meaning “relative” or “kinsman,” came from the adjective sibb, “related by blood” (the ancestor of modern English sibling). Old English godsibb was a person spiritually related to another, specifically by being a sponsor at baptism. Today we call such a person a godparent. Over the centuries, godsibb changed both in form and in meaning. Middle English gossib came to be used for a close friend or crony as well as for a godparent. From there it was only a short step to the gossip of today, a person no longer necessarily friend, relative, or sponsor, but someone filled with irresistible tidbits of rumor.

Examples of gossip in a Sentence

Noun He had been spreading gossip about his coworkers. the latest news and gossip from the entertainment industry She writes a gossip column in the paper. I like having a good gossip now and then. Verb They spent the afternoon gossiping on the phone. They often gossip with each other about their neighbors.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun Even this isn’t new; as a college student, Brian Stelter, for instance, got his start in media with his blog, TVNewser, which ventured deep into the weeds of an industry that loved to read gossip about itself. Steven Levy, Wired, "The Tenuous Promise of the Substack Dream," 20 Nov. 2020 Being more transparent in communicating about COVID-19-positive cases to thwart gossip. Jamie L. Lareau, Detroit Free Press, "GM ups effort to safeguard parts supplied for its full-size pickup, SUV plants," 18 Nov. 2020 Playing your cards close to your chest and avoiding gossip is your best course of action. Tarot Astrologers, chicagotribune.com, "Daily horoscope for November 15, 2020," 15 Nov. 2020 Shep continues to spread gossip at his party, upsetting Madison and ultimately affecting his friendship with Austen. Washington Post, "What to watch on Thursday: ‘Two Weeks to Live’ on HBO Max," 5 Nov. 2020 The study concluded that participants who wrote in gratitude journals participated in significantly less gossip and other toxic behaviors at work. Amy Dickinson, oregonlive, "Ask Amy: Office gossip, complaining continues even into COVID-19 era," 30 Oct. 2020 In the film, the characters write rumors and spread gossip throughout its pages. Olivia Wilson, CBS News, "Brown University students create "Burn Brown Book," outlining racism and activism on campus," 26 Oct. 2020 For those who can't remember celeb gossip from 2012, the song from Swift's Red album is rumored to be about their relationship. Emily Tannenbaum, Glamour, "Why Taylor Swift Fans Are Flooding Jake Gyllenhaal’s IG With ‘All Too Well’ Lyrics," 30 Sep. 2020 Porches offered neighbors a place to exchange gossip, to spin sagas and sing songs, to flirt and court and air political views. Spike Carlsen, WSJ, "The Forgotten Front Porch Is Making a Comeback," 26 Sep. 2020 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb Not above the drama are Bennett and Ed, who gossip about Chasen's intentions. Anna Moeslein, Glamour, "The Bachelorette, Season 16, Episode 6, Recap: So Noah Is the New Villain, Right?," 18 Nov. 2020 Fellow players would gossip that jealousy had driven her to smear a more accomplished rival, a decent man who'd just come through a harrowing family drama. Brendan I. Koerner, Wired, "The Cheating Scandal That Ripped the Poker World Apart," 21 Sep. 2020 For two days, my friends took every free moment to huddle together and gossip about their virtual friends in the 3DS life-simulation game Tomodachi Life. Cecilia D'anastasio, Wired, "The Surprisingly Social Legacy of the Nintendo 3DS," 17 Sep. 2020 On a particularly scenic hill, which overlooks the London Zoo and, in the distance, the empty city center, teen-agers like to smoke and gossip and hug; their relief at seeing one another is palpable. Anna Russell, The New Yorker, "The Laughing-Gas Wars of London," 4 Aug. 2020 From tabloids to celebrity magazines to gossip sites, the drama industry’s basic interests and business model haven’t changed much since. Cecilia D'anastasio, Wired, "#PokimaneBoyfriend and the Scandalous Reign of Drama YouTube," 31 July 2020 Meeting digitally in real time to gossip, joke, and share a meal over a videocall will light up the same endorphin pathways as a night out with friends. Rebecca Renner, National Geographic, "Why some people can't resist crowds despite the pandemic," 24 June 2020 The three women oftenate lunch together, gossiped together and waded through pregnancy together. Maggie Menderski, The Courier-Journal, "These 64-year-old Louisville natives are finally celebrating their 'Sweet 16' on Leap Day," 25 Feb. 2020 The doors would swing open to reveal a cast of regular customers, gossiping and sipping on cocktails, letting down their hair before their styling appointments began. Ikya Kandula, SFChronicle.com, "Black salons seemed recession proof. They’re not pandemic proof.," 1 May 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'gossip.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of gossip

Noun

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Verb

1627, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for gossip

Noun and Verb

Middle English gossib, from Old English godsibb, from god god + sibb kinsman, from sibb related — more at sib

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Time Traveler for gossip

Time Traveler

The first known use of gossip was before the 12th century

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Statistics for gossip

Last Updated

25 Nov 2020

Cite this Entry

“Gossip.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/gossip. Accessed 1 Dec. 2020.

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More Definitions for gossip

gossip

noun
How to pronounce gossip (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of gossip

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: information about the behavior and personal lives of other people
: information about the lives of famous people
: a person who often talks about the private details of other people's lives

gossip

verb

English Language Learners Definition of gossip (Entry 2 of 2)

: to talk about the personal lives of other people

gossip

noun
gos·​sip | \ ˈgä-səp How to pronounce gossip (audio) \

Kids Definition of gossip

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : a person who repeats stories about other people
2 : talk or rumors involving the personal lives of other people

gossip

verb
gossiped; gossiping

Kids Definition of gossip (Entry 2 of 2)

: to talk about the personal lives of other people

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Comments on gossip

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