gossip

noun
gos·​sip | \ ˈgä-səp How to pronounce gossip (audio) \

Definition of gossip

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1a dialectal British : godparent
c : a person who habitually reveals personal or sensational facts about others the worst gossip in town
2a : rumor or report of an intimate nature spreading gossip about their divorce
b : a chatty talk
c : the subject matter of gossip Their breakup was common gossip.

gossip

verb
gossiped; gossiping; gossips

Definition of gossip (Entry 2 of 2)

intransitive verb

: to relate gossip (see gossip entry 1 sense 2a)

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Other Words from gossip

Noun

gossipry \ ˈgä-​sə-​prē How to pronounce gossipry (audio) \ noun

Verb

gossiper noun

Did You Know?

Old English sibb, meaning “relative” or “kinsman,” came from the adjective sibb, “related by blood” (the ancestor of modern English sibling). Old English godsibb was a person spiritually related to another, specifically by being a sponsor at baptism. Today we call such a person a godparent. Over the centuries, godsibb changed both in form and in meaning. Middle English gossib came to be used for a close friend or crony as well as for a godparent. From there it was only a short step to the gossip of today, a person no longer necessarily friend, relative, or sponsor, but someone filled with irresistible tidbits of rumor.

Examples of gossip in a Sentence

Noun

He had been spreading gossip about his coworkers. the latest news and gossip from the entertainment industry She writes a gossip column in the paper. I like having a good gossip now and then.

Verb

They spent the afternoon gossiping on the phone. They often gossip with each other about their neighbors.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

Avoid exaggerating, being indulgent or taking part in gossip or risky ventures. Eugenia Last, The Mercury News, "Horoscopes: Sept. 2, 2019," 2 Sep. 2019 And irony is about calling someone tacky and classless by way of a tacky and classless gossip campaign. Carolyn Hax, oregonlive.com, "Carolyn Hax: Gift card request may be tacky, but so is being a gossip," 28 Aug. 2019 Rather than getting your facial treatment in a private spa room with New Age music, Skin Camp’s 15- to 45-minute treatments are delivered in the middle of a salon, served up with gossip and the sound of Kanye West and Shaggy floating overhead. Melinda Fulmer, Los Angeles Times, "Skin Camp: Where your face goes to get rejuvenated over summer vacation," 23 Aug. 2019 Less than a day after actor Liam Hemsworth filed for divorce from wife, singer Miley Cyrus and less than week after the two separated, Cyrus is pushing back on gossip from people speculating about infidelity. Cady Lang, Time, "Miley Cyrus Slams Rumors About the End of Her Marriage in Twitter Thread: 'I Have Nothing to Hide'," 22 Aug. 2019 Those wishing for Bonas to drop some juicy gossip from the nuptials will have to settle for her dilemma with the dress code. Erica Gonzales, Harper's BAZAAR, "Prince Harry's Ex Cressida Bonas Is Engaged to Another Harry," 19 Aug. 2019 Downsides of being a duchess: Lack of privacy, gossip spread about you in the press, and wearing high heels way more than any human should have to. Kayleigh Roberts, Marie Claire, "Kate Middleton Reportedly Wears These $20 High Heel Insoles," 18 Aug. 2019 Speculation about a sensational Neymar return to Camp Nou just two years after leaving in a controversial €222m world record transfer has dominated the summer, with gossip linking the Brazilian with a move to Real Madrid emerging more recently. SI.com, "Neymar Latest: Barcelona Prepare New Offer as Report Claims Saga Will Be 'Resolved' in 48 Hrs," 14 Aug. 2019 The image, which appeared to have been taken at a recording studio, sent social media gossips into a frenzy: Could a joint summer anthem actually be in the works? Vogue, "Cardi B and Anitta Have a High Fashion Meet Up," 13 Aug. 2019

Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

Ms Jayapal says her relative has much to gossip about over tea with a close friend in the city, the aunt of another American politician, Kamala Harris. The Economist, "The rising clout of Indian Americans," 23 July 2019 Don’t involve the other Kids in this, and don’t gossip about it. Amy Dickinson, The Denver Post, "Ask Amy: Crowded vacation house leaves some exhausted," 18 Aug. 2019 In the meantime, Deutsche Bank employees in New York and Jacksonville, Fla., have been gossiping about whether the bank is going to pull out of the United States entirely. David Enrich, New York Times, "Deutsche Bank, in a Last-Ditch Effort to Stop Its Spiral, Could Lay Off 20,000," 28 June 2019 There are some people who when gossiping about some moral outrage or act of depravity positively glow. Kevin D. Williamson, National Review, "Judge, if You Must, but Curb the Glee: Notes from Las Vegas," 18 July 2019 Lack of awareness My classmates often gossiped about Karan Johar and Shahrukh Khan. Apoorva Malhotra, Quartz India, "A personal account of what it means to be gay in India," 17 July 2019 The little town in the New Mexico desert where the series was set had all the hallmarks of the small-town drama, from gossiping neighbors to love connections to marriages falling apart. Emily Todd Vanderwerff, Vox, "Manhattan, streaming on Hulu, is one of the best, most unheralded dramas of the 2010s," 12 July 2019 Afterward the women washed the dishes and gossiped about royal babies in an atmosphere akin to a church social. Stanley Stewart, Condé Nast Traveler, "Exploring Polynesia's Islands by Cruise," 28 June 2019 Avoid gossiping during this period, as rumors may be extra unreliable due to Mercury retrograde, thanks to the full moon and eclipse energy. Sophie Saint Thomas, Allure, "How to Use This Month's Mercury Retrograde to Your Advantage," 27 June 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'gossip.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of gossip

Noun

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Verb

1627, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for gossip

Noun and Verb

Middle English gossib, from Old English godsibb, from god god + sibb kinsman, from sibb related — more at sib

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Statistics for gossip

Last Updated

7 Sep 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for gossip

The first known use of gossip was before the 12th century

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More Definitions for gossip

gossip

noun

English Language Learners Definition of gossip

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: information about the behavior and personal lives of other people
: information about the lives of famous people
: a person who often talks about the private details of other people's lives

gossip

verb

English Language Learners Definition of gossip (Entry 2 of 2)

: to talk about the personal lives of other people

gossip

noun
gos·​sip | \ ˈgä-səp How to pronounce gossip (audio) \

Kids Definition of gossip

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : a person who repeats stories about other people
2 : talk or rumors involving the personal lives of other people

gossip

verb
gossiped; gossiping

Kids Definition of gossip (Entry 2 of 2)

: to talk about the personal lives of other people

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More from Merriam-Webster on gossip

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for gossip

Spanish Central: Translation of gossip

Nglish: Translation of gossip for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of gossip for Arabic Speakers

Comments on gossip

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