gallop

verb
gal·​lop | \ ˈga-ləp How to pronounce gallop (audio) \
galloped; galloping; gallops

Definition of gallop

 (Entry 1 of 2)

intransitive verb

1 : to progress or ride at a gallop
2 : to run fast

transitive verb

1 : to cause to gallop
2 : to transport at a gallop

gallop

noun

Definition of gallop (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : a bounding gait of a quadruped specifically : a fast natural usually 4-beat gait of the horse — compare canter entry 3, run
2 : a ride or run at a gallop
3 : a stretch of land suitable for galloping horses
4 : a rapid or hasty progression or pace

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Other Words from gallop

Verb

galloper noun

Synonyms for gallop

Synonyms: Verb

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Examples of gallop in a Sentence

Verb The horse galloped toward us. He mounted his horse and galloped off to sound the alarm. She galloped her horse toward us. I grabbed my books and galloped out the door. The program gallops through early American history. Noun The horse was at full gallop. He mounted his horse and took off at a gallop. We went for a gallop through the countryside.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Verb The horses gallop and rear with such realism and frenzy the viewer feels compelled to jump out of the way. Claudine Doury, Smithsonian Magazine, "The Redemption of Rosa Bonheur," 20 Oct. 2020 The final 150 pages gallop through the Civil War, quoting extensively from Lincoln’s most famous works, with cursory paragraphs providing context. Adam Rowe, WSJ, "‘The Zealot and the Emancipator’ Review: A Deadly Confrontation," 4 Oct. 2020 In the first decade of the 21st century, economic growth allowed some developing countries to gallop faster than wealthier nations in North America and Europe. Jon Emont, WSJ, "Covid-19 May Keep Developing Countries From Catching Up to Rich Ones," 5 Aug. 2020 More than 200 years ago, when George Washington created the U.S. Postal Service, news only traveled as fast as a horse could gallop. Emily Matchar, Smithsonian Magazine, "Nine Educational Livestreams Coming From Historical Sites in the United States," 11 May 2020 Anything higher than that is known as tachycardia, the fancy way of describing the sensation that your heart is galloping a mile a minute. Zahra Barnes, SELF, "10 Surprising Reasons Your Heart Is Racing and How to Remedy Them," 27 Mar. 2020 But whereas a horse may gallop for a couple minutes in the Kentucky Derby, a python can keep its metabolic rate at its extreme elevation for two weeks. Carl Zimmer, New York Times, "Eat Rat, Make New Body: Easy Stuff for Pythons," 12 May 2020 Mercy wasn’t the only fan of the single’s galloping beat and catchy chorus. Hilary Hughes, EW.com, "Jason Isbell is not afraid," 11 May 2020 But that pales in comparison to Europe and Asia, which are galloping ahead in electric vehicle adoption. Lydia Depillis, ProPublica, "To Understand the Medical Supply Shortage, It Helps to Know How the U.S. Lost the Lithium Ion Battery to China," 21 Apr. 2020 Recent Examples on the Web: Noun Brady threw for 341 yards and three scores, and Ronald Jones had a career game with 192 yards rushing and a TD – a franchise-record 98-yard gallop. Jeremy Cluff, The Arizona Republic, "Los Angeles Rams vs. Tampa Bay Buccaneers picks, predictions: Who wins Week 11 NFL game?," 17 Nov. 2020 Thanks to a perfect ball from Wilson, Milne was able to come down with the 78-yard catch and gallop for a touchdown. Joseph Salvador, USA TODAY, "Five biggest plays from Week 7 of college football," 18 Oct. 2020 And then, suddenly, what had been a gallop became a grind. Star Tribune, "Novak Djokovic pushed to five sets before reaching final in French Open against Rafael Nadal," 9 Oct. 2020 How it was won Spears' fifth score of the game came on a 49-yard gallop to extend the lead to 41-28 late in the fourth quarter. Dashone Dunomes, NOLA.com, "Brother Martin speed too much for Ponchatoula: Jaylon Spears scores four TDs," 2 Oct. 2020 The former Yoakum track star did the rest himself, blazing by one lunging defender and leaving a couple others in his wake on a 78-yard gallop into the end zone. Nick Moyle, ExpressNews.com, "Back from suspension, Texas WR Josh Moore ready to prove he belongs," 21 Sep. 2020 Thursday, Houston again struck first thanks to Johnson's 19-yard, first-quarter TD gallop ... and then Kansas City went on a 31-0 tear. Nate Davis, USA TODAY, "Winners and losers from the Chiefs' NFL season-opening win against Texans," 11 Sep. 2020 Art Collector, winner of the Blue Grass Stakes and Ellis Park Derby in his last two races, was pulled with a minor injury during Monday’s gallop. John Cherwa, Los Angeles Times, "Kentucky Derby draw: Tiz the Law is the favorite; Art Collector is out," 1 Sep. 2020 Over time the agreements slowed the arms race from a gallop to a jog. Jessica T. Mathews, The New York Review of Books, "The New Nuclear Threat," 22 July 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'gallop.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of gallop

Verb

15th century, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense 1

Noun

1523, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for gallop

Verb

Middle English galopen, walopen, borrowed from Anglo-French galoper, gualoper (Picard dialect waloper), perhaps going back to Old Low Franconian *wala hlaupan, literally "to run well," from *wala "well, with good appearance or effect" (going back to Germanic *welō) + *hlaupan "to run," going back to Germanic *hlaup-a- — more at well entry 3, leap entry 1

Note: An alternative explanation sees the Old French noun as primary, and derived from Old Low Franconian *walhlaup-, from *wal- "battlefield" and *hlaup-, a nominal derivative of *hlaupan (hence alluding to a warriorʼs manner of riding on the battlefield). Though the meaning of the first noun is reflected in Old High German wal "battlefield," the general meaning of the Germanic etymon is "the slain, the dead in battle" (see valhalla).

Noun

borrowed from Middle French & Anglo-French galop, noun derivative of galoper "to gallop entry 1"; replacing Middle English walop, borrowed from Anglo-French walop, galop

Note: Alternatively, the noun could be original, and the verb a derivative of the noun. See note at gallop entry 1.

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Time Traveler for gallop

Time Traveler

The first known use of gallop was in the 15th century

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Statistics for gallop

Last Updated

26 Oct 2020

Cite this Entry

“Gallop.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/gallop. Accessed 24 Nov. 2020.

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More Definitions for gallop

gallop

verb
How to pronounce gallop (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of gallop

 (Entry 1 of 2)

of a horse or similar animal : to run very fast : to run at a gallop
: to ride on a galloping horse
: to make (a horse) gallop

gallop

noun

English Language Learners Definition of gallop (Entry 2 of 2)

: the way a horse or similar animal moves when it is running fast and all four of its feet leave the ground at the same time
: a ride or run at a gallop

gallop

verb
gal·​lop | \ ˈga-ləp How to pronounce gallop (audio) \
galloped; galloping

Kids Definition of gallop

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : to run or cause to run at a gallop
2 : to ride on a galloping horse

gallop

noun

Kids Definition of gallop (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : the fast springing way an animal with four feet and especially a horse runs when all four of its feet leave the ground at the same time
2 : a ride or run on a galloping horse
gal·​lop | \ ˈgal-əp How to pronounce gallop (audio) \

Medical Definition of gallop

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to progress or ride at a gallop

transitive verb

: to cause to gallop

gallop

noun

Medical Definition of gallop (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : a bounding gait of a quadruped specifically : a fast natural 3-beat gait of the horse

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Comments on gallop

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