fruition

noun
fru·​ition | \ frü-ˈi-shən How to pronounce fruition (audio) \

Definition of fruition

1 : pleasurable use or possession : enjoyment the sweet fruition of an earthly crown— Christopher Marlowe
2a : the state of bearing fruit the fields needed rain for fruition— Pearl Buck

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Did You Know?

Fruition must come from the word fruit, right? Not exactly. Fruition and fruit are related (both ultimately come from the Latin verb frui, meaning "to enjoy"), but they were derived independently. The original meaning of fruition had nothing to do with fruit. Rather, when the term was first used in the early 15th century, it meant only "pleasurable use or possession." Not until the 19th century did fruition develop a second meaning, "the state of bearing fruit," possibly as the result of a mistaken assumption that fruition evolved from fruit. The "state of bearing fruit" sense was followed quickly by the figurative application to anything that can be "realized" and metaphorically bear fruit, such as a plan or a project.

Examples of fruition in a Sentence

These were dreams of long standing that had finally come to fruition — Nicholas Fraser, Harper's, September 1996 Truth is a weapon so powerful that the slowness of its fruition matters little in the end. — Edith Hamilton, New Yorker, 12 Sept. 1994 The ground thaws, the sap flows, then comes the leaf, the bud, the full flowering of national and individual entitlements, an unstoppable surge toward the glorious fruition promised by the idea of independence. — Janette Turner Hospital, New York Times Book Review, 30 Dec. 1990 when she landed the lead in a Broadway play, a lifelong dream was brought to fruition
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Recent Examples on the Web

There were several return dates announced during the past two months, but none came to fruition. Selena Barrientos, Good Housekeeping, "Here's the Tea About Wendy Williams' Return to 'The Wendy Williams Show'," 4 Mar. 2019 Presuming its final design comes to fruition, the Szorenyi faces an existential question: What is the rotary's place in the world? Matthew Jancer, Popular Mechanics, "The Rhombus Rotary Engine: Can a Quirky New Design Top the Famous Wankel?," 18 Jan. 2019 The plan never came into fruition; Mr. Guzmán’s brother was killed in prison in 2004. Nicole Hong, WSJ, "‘El Chapo’ Jury Told of Cartel’s Tricks, From Submarines to Laundry Carts," 3 Jan. 2019 And of course, when that plan finally comes into fruition, all of our love comes tumbling back over glasses of wine or cups of tea or bowls of ramen. Sara Petersen, Vox, "Why do we stop giving meaningful gifts to our friends?," 3 Dec. 2018 Because Goodwin might seize on the good news and utilize Thursday's All-NBA announcement to push that Allen-Lillard meeting into fruition. John Canzano, OregonLive.com, "Canzano: Damian Lillard gets First Team All-NBA nod... and another meeting with Paul Allen?," 24 May 2018 Other presidents have also influenced Justice Department rule making to help their preferred policies come into fruition, then watched as those rules became fodder for lawsuits. Ali Watkins, New York Times, "Pressured by Trump, A.T.F. Revisits Bump Stock Rules," 13 Mar. 2018 There is no guarantee a deal to end conservatorship will come to fruition. Andrew Ackerman, WSJ, "Popular Hedge Fund Bet on Fannie and Freddie Is Paying Off Big This Year," 26 Jan. 2019 But when a reunion does come to fruition, the experience can be not only memorable, but magical. Michaela Bechler, Vogue, "How to Plan a Multi-Generational Family Trip to Japan," 25 Jan. 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'fruition.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of fruition

15th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for fruition

Middle English fruicioun, from Anglo-French or Late Latin; Anglo-French fruicion, from Late Latin fruition-, fruitio, from Latin frui — see fruit entry 1

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Last Updated

16 Mar 2019

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The first known use of fruition was in the 15th century

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More Definitions for fruition

fruition

noun

English Language Learners Definition of fruition

: the state of being real or complete

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More from Merriam-Webster on fruition

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with fruition

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for fruition

Spanish Central: Translation of fruition

Nglish: Translation of fruition for Spanish Speakers

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