fruition

noun
fru·​ition | \frü-ˈi-shən \

Definition of fruition 

1 : pleasurable use or possession : enjoyment the sweet fruition of an earthly crown— Christopher Marlowe

2a : the state of bearing fruit the fields needed rain for fruition— Pearl Buck

b : realization

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Did You Know?

Fruition must come from the word fruit, right? Not exactly. Fruition and fruit are related (both ultimately come from the Latin verb frui, meaning "to enjoy"), but they were derived independently. The original meaning of fruition had nothing to do with fruit. Rather, when the term was first used in the early 15th century, it meant only "pleasurable use or possession." Not until the 19th century did fruition develop a second meaning, "the state of bearing fruit," possibly as the result of a mistaken assumption that fruition evolved from fruit. The "state of bearing fruit" sense was followed quickly by the figurative application to anything that can be "realized" and metaphorically bear fruit, such as a plan or a project.

Examples of fruition in a Sentence

These were dreams of long standing that had finally come to fruition — Nicholas Fraser, Harper's, September 1996 Truth is a weapon so powerful that the slowness of its fruition matters little in the end. — Edith Hamilton, New Yorker, 12 Sept. 1994 The ground thaws, the sap flows, then comes the leaf, the bud, the full flowering of national and individual entitlements, an unstoppable surge toward the glorious fruition promised by the idea of independence. — Janette Turner Hospital, New York Times Book Review, 30 Dec. 1990 when she landed the lead in a Broadway play, a lifelong dream was brought to fruition
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Recent Examples on the Web

Houston, always desperate in a pursuit of the Warriors that will never reach fruition, is said to be interested in Anthony. ... Bruce Jenkins, SFChronicle.com, "Best of the World Cup: when cultures mix," 6 July 2018 But our idyllic deflowering fantasies rarely came to fruition. Karley Sciortino, Vogue, "Is There a “Right” Way to Lose Your Virginity?," 19 Oct. 2018 State tax incentives for bringing jobs back to Indiana could amount to more than $50 million over time if the project comes to fruition. Gary Gastelu, Fox News, "Rivian Automotive looking to battle electric cars with battery-powered trucks," 21 Sep. 2018 Sanctions would need to be relaxed for these plans to come to fruition, so in effect the agreement is a call to let the North resume trading with the world. The Editorial Board, WSJ, "Moon Shot in Korea," 19 Sep. 2018 Merger arbitrage funds, which bet on whether corporate deals will come to fruition, gained 2.63 percent. James B. Stewart, New York Times, "Hedge Funds Should Be Thriving Right Now. They Aren’t.," 12 July 2018 The chances are that nothing will come to fruition (if there even is anything that will be done) until France are out of the World Cup. SI.com, "Lyon Chief Reveals Recent 'Long' Conversations With Man Utd Boss Jose Mourinho," 26 June 2018 Although Barnsdall’s dreams of a creative utopia never came to fruition, today this public park is home to one of the best spots for sunbathing in Los Angeles. Hadley Meares, Los Angeles Magazine, "10 Historic L.A. Places to Visit on a Sunny Day," 14 May 2018 But the Schepisi adaptation — which was to star Gilliam’s Monty Python compatriot Cleese — never came to fruition, and by the next year, Gilliam was planning to make his own film. Alissa Wilkinson, Vox, "The Man Who Killed Don Quixote’s long, possibly cursed journey to the big screen, explained," 9 May 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'fruition.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of fruition

15th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for fruition

Middle English fruicioun, from Anglo-French or Late Latin; Anglo-French fruicion, from Late Latin fruition-, fruitio, from Latin frui — see fruit entry 1

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Last Updated

7 Dec 2018

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Time Traveler for fruition

The first known use of fruition was in the 15th century

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More Definitions for fruition

fruition

noun

English Language Learners Definition of fruition

: the state of being real or complete

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More from Merriam-Webster on fruition

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with fruition

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for fruition

Spanish Central: Translation of fruition

Nglish: Translation of fruition for Spanish Speakers

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