forge

1 of 3

noun

1
: a furnace or a shop with its furnace where metal is heated and wrought : smithy
2
: a workshop where wrought iron is produced or where iron is made malleable

forge

2 of 3

verb (1)

forged; forging

transitive verb

1
a
: to form (something, such as metal) by heating and hammering
forged pieces of iron into hooks
b
: to form (metal) by a mechanical or hydraulic press with or without heat
2
: to make or imitate falsely especially with intent to defraud : counterfeit
forge a document
forge a signature
3
: to form or bring into being especially by an expenditure of effort
working to forge party unity
The two countries forged a strong alliance.

intransitive verb

1
: to work at a forge
2
: to commit forgery (see forgery sense 3)
forgeability noun
forgeable adjective

forge

3 of 3

verb (2)

forged; forging

intransitive verb

1
: to move forward slowly and steadily
the ship forged ahead through heavy seas
2
: to move with a sudden increase of speed and power
forged into the lead
forged ahead in marketing the product

Did you know?

Are "forging ahead" and "forging a check" from the same forge?

There are many things you can do with the word forge in English. You can forge ahead (which, confusingly enough, can mean either "move slowly and steadily" or "move with a sudden increase of speed"), you can forge a check or a painting (make something fake), or you can forge a sword (make something real). The senses that relate to creating something (either real or fake) come from the same Latin word that gives us fabric, which is fabricare ("to fashion, construct"). We are not certain where the “movement” senses of forge come from, except insofar as we know that they are from a different origin than the “creation” senses of the word.

Examples of forge in a Sentence

Verb (1) arrested for forging the doctor's signature on the prescription both sides labored mightily to forge a peace treaty loved the artisan look of that hand-forged copper pot Verb (2) the rescue team forged ahead despite the bad weather
Recent Examples on the Web
Noun
Based on true accounts and shot shot entirely on 16mm film, June Zero underscores the notion that shared traumas forge strong and unexpected bonds. Jill Goldsmith, Deadline, 28 June 2024 As a global economic actor, China is central to the prosperity of American allies and partners; its students and tourists flow through global universities and cities; its factories are the forge for much of the world’s advanced technology. Kurt M. Campbell, Foreign Affairs, 1 Aug. 2019
Verb
The ‘Bone Crusher’ The president and his physician have spent 15 years forging a relationship rooted in their similar origins. Dan Diamond, Washington Post, 6 July 2024 And yet there’s something rather moving in their attempts to forge meaningful time together — the effort is a kind of love in itself, enduring if not growing in the impasse between them. Guy Lodge, Variety, 6 July 2024
Verb
Sean Manaea poured a 94 mph fastball in for a strike to his catcher, Blake Sabol, and forged a bit of history. Matt Kawahara, San Francisco Chronicle, 8 Apr. 2023 The Vichy police caught Spira forging documents and deported him to Poland, and he was imprisoned at Auschwitz, Buchenwald, and Theresienstadt. Town & Country, 8 Apr. 2023 See all Example Sentences for forge 

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'forge.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

Etymology

Noun

Middle English, "smith's workshop," borrowed from Anglo-French, going back to Gallo-Romance *faurga, going back to Latin fabrica "process of making something, craft, workshop" — more at fabric

Verb (1)

Middle English forgen "to form, shape (metal by heat), invent, contrive, counterfeit," borrowed from Anglo-French forger, forgier, going back to Latin fabricāre, fabricārī "to fashion, shape, construct" — more at fabricate

Verb (2)

origin unknown

First Known Use

Noun

13th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb (1)

14th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1a

Verb (2)

1611, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Time Traveler
The first known use of forge was in the 13th century

Dictionary Entries Near forge

Cite this Entry

“Forge.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/forge. Accessed 15 Jul. 2024.

Kids Definition

forge

1 of 3 noun
ˈfō(ə)rj How to pronounce forge (audio)
ˈfȯ(ə)rj
: a furnace or a shop with its furnace where metal is shaped and worked by heating and hammering

forge

2 of 3 verb
forged; forging
1
a
: to form (as metal) by heating and hammering
b
: to form (metal) by a press
2
: to make or imitate falsely especially with intent to deceive : counterfeit
forge a check
forge a signature
3
: to form or shape in any way : fashion
forged an agreement
forger noun

forge

3 of 3 verb
forged; forging
: to move forward steadily but gradually
forged through the snow
Etymology

Noun

Middle English forge "workshop where metal is heated and shaped," from early French forge (same meaning), from Latin fabrica "workshop for making things of metal"

Verb

origin unknown

Medical Definition

forge

intransitive verb
forged; forging
of a horse
: to make a clicking noise by overreaching so that a hind shoe hits a fore shoe

Legal Definition

forge

verb
forged; forging

transitive verb

: to make, alter, or imitate (as a writing) falsely with intent to defraud : counterfeit

intransitive verb

: to commit forgery
forger noun

More from Merriam-Webster on forge

Last Updated: - Updated example sentences
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