disgorge

verb

dis·​gorge (ˌ)dis-ˈgȯrj How to pronounce disgorge (audio)
disgorged; disgorging; disgorges

transitive verb

1
: to discharge by the throat and mouth : vomit
Like llamas, which disgorge stomach juices to show pique or displeasure, many animals spew fluids from their mouths, and for a variety of reasons.Noel Vietmeyer
2
: to discharge or let go of rapidly or forcefully
The train disgorged its passengers.
Low-flying planes disgorged wave after wave of para-troopers.Michael Dobbs
Customers arrive in human waves, sometimes disgorged fifty at a time from their tour buses …Barbara Ehrenreich
3
: to give up or reveal (something) on request or under pressure
The Times was threatened with its $5,000-a-day fine if it failed to obey a court order in New Jersey to disgorge the name of one of its news sources …The New York Sun
… the 8th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals on Sept. 5 ordered a … salesman to disgorge about $468,000 he had earned by defrauding Iowa banks that were his customers.The National Law Journal
4
: to remove (sediment) from (a bottle of sparkling wine) after secondary fermentation in the bottle is complete
The bottles are gently turned daily for about six weeks until they are almost upside down in the rack. Then the sediment, concentrated in the neck of the bottle, is disgorged.Leslie Martin

intransitive verb

: to discharge contents
where the river disgorges into the sea

Example Sentences

We watched the airplane disgorging its passengers at the gate. The damaged ship disgorged thousands of gallons of oil into the bay. The river disgorges into the ocean just south of the city.
Recent Examples on the Web The committee agreed to disgorge $2,000 from the funds. Stephanie Ebbert, BostonGlobe.com, 25 Nov. 2022 Cruise ships disgorge passengers into coaches that head to the Cave of the Apocalypse, where John is said to have received the visions that inspired his famous biblical text, before heading straight back again. Joe Minihane, CNN, 8 Nov. 2022 To settle the charges, Ms. Kardashian must disgorge the fee with interest, pay a million-dollar penalty, and promise not to promote any crypto products for three years. M. Todd Henderson, WSJ, 6 Oct. 2022 For the next several weeks, acres of gingham blankets will be unfurled in grassy parkscapes coast to coast upon which thousands of wicker hampers will disgorge their comestible contents for the benefit of those who wish to dine al fresco. Adam Tschorn, Los Angeles Times, 13 July 2022 The prospect of an increasingly militarized Europe—even a future one not actively at war—is the prospect of a continent that will disgorge ever more greenhouse gasses to maintain those swelling forces. Matt Simon, Wired, 10 Mar. 2022 After nearly three hours of fighting, the Russian helicopters began to land and disgorge airborne troops, who fanned out and began firing. James Marson, WSJ, 3 Mar. 2022 The buyer will then decide when to disgorge (between 3 and 10 years after the harvest) and how much dosage (sugar) should be added. Per And Britt Karlsson, Forbes, 27 Dec. 2021 Buses disgorge children in school uniforms on class trips. New York Times, 18 Dec. 2021 See More

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'disgorge.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

Word History

Etymology

Middle French desgorger, from des- dis- + gorge gorge

First Known Use

15th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1a

Time Traveler
The first known use of disgorge was in the 15th century

Dictionary Entries Near disgorge

Cite this Entry

“Disgorge.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/disgorge. Accessed 7 Feb. 2023.

Kids Definition

disgorge

verb
dis·​gorge (ˈ)dis-ˈgȯ(ə)rj How to pronounce disgorge (audio)
1
2
: to cause to come out violently or forcefully
the volcano disgorged lava

Legal Definition

disgorge

transitive verb
dis·​gorge dis-ˈgȯrj How to pronounce disgorge (audio)
disgorged; disgorging
: to give up (as illegally gained profits) on request, under pressure, or by court order especially to prevent unjust enrichment
ordered a…salesman to disgorge about $468,000 he had earned by defrauding Iowa banksNational Law Journal
disgorgement noun
Last Updated: - Updated example sentences
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