forfeit

noun
for·​feit | \ ˈfȯr-fət How to pronounce forfeit (audio) \

Definition of forfeit

 (Entry 1 of 3)

1 : something forfeited or subject to being forfeited (as for a crime, offense, or neglect of duty) : penalty They were required to pay a forfeit.
2 : forfeiture especially of civil rights
3a : something deposited (as for making a mistake in a game) and then redeemed on payment of a fine
b forfeits plural : a game in which forfeits are exacted

forfeit

verb
forfeited; forfeiting; forfeits

Definition of forfeit (Entry 2 of 3)

transitive verb

1 : to lose or lose the right to especially by some error, offense, or crime
2 : to subject to confiscation as a forfeit also : abandon, give up

forfeit

adjective

Definition of forfeit (Entry 3 of 3)

: forfeited or subject to forfeiture

Other Words from forfeit

Verb

forfeitable \ ˈfȯr-​fə-​tə-​bəl How to pronounce forfeit (audio) \ adjective
forfeiter noun

Synonyms for forfeit

Synonyms: Noun

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Examples of forfeit in a Sentence

Noun the forfeit for each baseball player involved in the brawl was $5,000 Verb He forfeited his right to a trial by jury. They didn't have enough players, so they ended up having to forfeit.
Recent Examples on the Web: Noun Also: The governor weighs in on the boys basketball Sabbath forfeit; a really big Crime Stoppers payout; and the Mobile County health officer’s retirement. Ike Morgan | Imorgan@al.com, al, 23 Feb. 2022 Third place – Hunter Isaacs (WV) 24-8 d. Hunter Sproles (Cooper) 21-5, forfeit. James Weber, The Enquirer, 13 Feb. 2022 People who leave jobs early forfeit the chance to save additional sums and must make their holdings last longer. Anne Tergesen, WSJ, 11 Feb. 2022 The Bears started the season 1-3 and that win only came by way of Moore’s forfeit. J.l. Kirven, The Courier-Journal, 14 Jan. 2022 Officials at the Northeast Regional at Jacksonville State told media Friday that the Faith Christian boys would win their game with Oakwood Academy by 2-0 forfeit. Ben Thomas | Bthomas@al.com, al, 19 Feb. 2022 The 285-pound match between Glenelg senior Dominic Magnolia and Reservoir’s Runor Agarin was the only bout not decided by pinfall or forfeit. Jacob Steinberg, baltimoresun.com, 13 Jan. 2022 The Illini’s game Sunday at Minnesota is up in the air after the Big Ten on Tuesday announced changes to its forfeit policy, which was put in place before the season. Gavin Good, chicagotribune.com, 30 Dec. 2021 As of Wednesday, multiple Power 5 conferences rescinded their forfeit policies. Alexa Philippou, courant.com, 22 Dec. 2021 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb North Central Texas College will forfeit the next two games due to a lack of available players, and the final game of the series will be played Saturday. Matt Young, Chron, 22 Apr. 2022 If these water providers can’t deliver Utah Lake water to irrigators, the municipalities would forfeit their access to water from the Cottonwood, Parleys and City Creek canyons. Brian Maffly, The Salt Lake Tribune, 28 Mar. 2022 The memo also said if a game had to be canceled because of an outbreak among unvaccinated players, that team would forfeit. Andrew Beaton, WSJ, 20 Dec. 2021 The league warned that if a COVID-19 outbreak occurs amongst unvaccinated players and forces a game to be canceled in the 18-week season, the team must forfeit. Naledi Ushe, PEOPLE.com, 17 Aug. 2021 Jones also will make restitution of $550,000 to the UAW, $42,000 to the Internal Revenue Service, forfeit more than $151,000 and pay a $10,000 fine, prosecutors said. Washington Post, 10 June 2021 Their brother-in-law, Arsen Galstyan, 40, also of Glendale, was sentenced to 18 months in prison and ordered to forfeit nearly $47,800. Kristina Davis, San Diego Union-Tribune, 22 Apr. 2022 Both teams were ordered to forfeit the game that was stopped. CBS News, 22 Apr. 2022 Bailey was also ordered to pay $1.4 million in restitution as well as forfeit his four-bedroom house in Maine and 78 acres of property in Butler, Alabama. al, 8 Apr. 2022 Recent Examples on the Web: Adjective Any portion of any prize not used by any winner is forfeit and no cash substitute will be offered or permitted. Ariel Cheung, chicagotribune.com, 20 Oct. 2021 By then, players were desperate to leave, willing to cover their own expenses, forfeit paychecks and risk potential lawsuits for breach of contract. Ben Cohen And Louise Radnofsky, WSJ, 8 Mar. 2022 A day after it was announced that the University of Houston couldn't play its American Athletic Conference opener against Cincinnati because of COVID-19 issues within its program, the conference changed its forfeit policy. Matt Young, Chron, 27 Dec. 2021 The final points for the Pointers came with Gab Dorsey being awarded a forfeit win at 120. Baltimore Sun Staff, baltimoresun.com, 12 Feb. 2022 Houston was to be assessed a forfeit loss, but those results weren't reflected on the AAC website as of Saturday. Pat Brennan, The Enquirer, 2 Jan. 2022 Tuesday, the Big Ten revised its COVID-19 forfeit policy. Akeem Glaspie, The Indianapolis Star, 30 Dec. 2021 College basketball has also seen the impact of the virus, with dozens of teams forced to cancel or forfeit games. Matt Murschel, orlandosentinel.com, 21 Dec. 2021 Others receiving votes: Priceville (8-1) 5, Bibb County (8-2) 4, Oneonta (9-1) 4. *--Record includes two forfeit losses. Ben Thomas | Bthomas@al.com, al, 27 Oct. 2021 See More

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'forfeit.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

First Known Use of forfeit

Noun

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Adjective

14th century, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for forfeit

Noun, Verb, and Adjective

Middle English forfait, from Anglo-French, from past participle of forfaire, forsfaire to commit a crime, forfeit, from fors outside (from Latin foris) + faire to do, from Latin facere — more at forum, do

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Time Traveler for forfeit

Time Traveler

The first known use of forfeit was in the 14th century

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Dictionary Entries Near forfeit

for fear of

forfeit

forfeited

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Statistics for forfeit

Last Updated

9 May 2022

Cite this Entry

“Forfeit.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/forfeit. Accessed 24 May. 2022.

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More Definitions for forfeit

forfeit

verb
for·​feit | \ ˈfȯr-fət How to pronounce forfeit (audio) \
forfeited; forfeiting

Kids Definition of forfeit

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to lose or lose the right to as punishment for a fault, error, or crime "If we stop now, we'll have to forfeit the match!" said Harry.— J. K. Rowling, Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets

forfeit

noun

Kids Definition of forfeit (Entry 2 of 2)

: something or the right to something lost as punishment for a fault, error, or crime

forfeit

noun
for·​feit | \ ˈfȯr-fət How to pronounce forfeit (audio) \

Legal Definition of forfeit

 (Entry 1 of 3)

: something forfeited or subject to being forfeited

forfeit

transitive verb

Legal Definition of forfeit (Entry 2 of 3)

1 : to lose or lose the right to by some default, failure, or neglect of obligation or duty or by some offense shall forfeit to the United States…any proceeds which the person obtained, directly or indirectly, from racketeering activityU.S. Code
2 : to subject to forfeiture it shall be placed in the custody of the Collector, who…shall cause a notice of the seizure and intention to forfeit and sell the sameMorgan v. United States, 107 F. Supp. 501 (1952)

Other Words from forfeit

forfeitability \ ˌfȯr-​fə-​tə-​ˈbi-​lə-​tē \ noun
forfeitable adjective

forfeit

adjective

Legal Definition of forfeit (Entry 3 of 3)

: forfeited or subject to forfeiture

History and Etymology for forfeit

Noun

Anglo-French, from Middle French forfait, past participle of forfaire to commit a crime, from fors outside + faire to do

More from Merriam-Webster on forfeit

Nglish: Translation of forfeit for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of forfeit for Arabic Speakers

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about forfeit

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