flux

noun
\ ˈfləks \

Definition of flux

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : a flowing of fluid from the body: such as
a : diarrhea
b : dysentery
2 : a continuous moving on or passing by (as of a stream)
3 : a continued flow : flood a flux of words
4a : influx
b : change, fluctuation in a state of flux the flux following the death of the emperor
5 : a substance used to promote fusion (as of metals or minerals) especially : one (such as rosin) applied to surfaces to be joined by soldering, brazing, or welding to clean and free them from oxide and promote their union
6 : the rate of transfer of fluid, particles, or energy across a given surface

flux

verb
fluxed; fluxing; fluxes

Definition of flux (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

1 : to cause to become fluid
2 : to treat with a flux

intransitive verb

: to become fluid : fuse

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Synonyms & Antonyms for flux

Synonyms: Noun

change, fluctuation, inconstancy, oscillation

Synonyms: Verb

deliquesce, fuse, liquefy (also liquify), melt, run, thaw

Antonyms: Verb

harden, set, solidify

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Examples of flux in a Sentence

Noun

the English language is always in a state of flux January typically brings a great flux of returns to department stores.

Verb

a solid will flux more quickly under pressure
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

Qualcomm recently won some injunctions from courts in Germany and China, though the enforcement of those rulings is still in flux. Dan Gallagher, WSJ, "Qualcomm’s Day in Court Is Priced In," 7 Jan. 2019 But then the cost of oil dropped again this fall, creating volatility and leaving airfare forecasts in flux, says Raddatz. Kristen Leigh Painter, Condé Nast Traveler, "How Air Travel Will Change in 2019," 13 Dec. 2018 The reflection ahead for Biden comes at a time when the Democratic presidential field is in flux. Meg Kinnard, The Seattle Times, "AP source: Biden to meet with family as he ponders 2020," 12 Dec. 2018 The Faraday cup, for example, will conduct several scientific measurements, of ions and electron fluxes and flow angles from the solar wind. David Grossman, Popular Mechanics, "Why the Sun-Studying Parker Space Probe Won't Melt," 20 July 2018 The river itself was a standard-issue metaphor of time’s ungraspable flux and constancy. Wells Tower, Outside Online, "Wells Tower on His First Kiss," 11 July 2018 The future of the VC business and its top firms are in flux and those who play it right stand to gain a lot and those who don’t stand to lose a lot. Polina Marinova, Fortune, "Term Sheet -- Monday, June 25," 25 June 2018 The study found that the reef has been particularly sensitive to sediment fluxes and more research needs to be done to understand how current practices are affecting sediment input and water quality on the reef, according to Webster. David Carrig, USA TODAY, "Great Barrier Reef has survived 5 near-death events but scientists unsure of its future," 29 May 2018 The lawmakers said details of the measures suggested by leadership remained in flux and a third, unspecified bill was possible. CBS News, "With election season heating up, GOP leaders weigh two immigration bills," 18 May 2018

Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

Next, clean and flux a shutoff valve for the cold side and slide it over the tubing end place and solder it in place. Steve Willson, Popular Mechanics, "How To Install An Electric Water Heater," 24 Aug. 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'flux.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of flux

Noun

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

15th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1

History and Etymology for flux

Noun and Verb

Middle English, from Anglo-French & Medieval Latin; Anglo-French, from Medieval Latin fluxus, from Latin, flow, from fluere to flow — more at fluid

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Statistics for flux

Last Updated

13 Jan 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for flux

The first known use of flux was in the 14th century

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More Definitions for flux

flux

noun

English Language Learners Definition of flux

: a series of changes : continuous change

: a substance used for helping to melt or join metals

flux

noun
\ ˈfləks \

Medical Definition of flux

1a : a flowing or discharge of fluid from the body especially when excessive or abnormal: as
(1) : diarrhea
(2) : dysentery
b : the matter discharged in a flux
2 : the rate of transfer of fluid, particles, or energy across a given surface

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More from Merriam-Webster on flux

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with flux

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for flux

Spanish Central: Translation of flux

Nglish: Translation of flux for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of flux for Arabic Speakers

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about flux

Comments on flux

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