suck

verb
\ ˈsək How to pronounce suck (audio) \
sucked; sucking; sucks

Definition of suck

 (Entry 1 of 2)

transitive verb

1a : to draw (something, such as liquid) into the mouth through a suction force produced by movements of the lips and tongue sucked milk from his mother's breast
b : to draw something from or consume by such movements suck an orange suck a lollipop
c : to apply the mouth to in order to or as if to suck out a liquid sucked his burned finger
2a : to draw by or as if by suction when a receding wave sucks the sand from under your feet— Kenneth Brower inadvertently sucked into the … intrigue— Martin Levin
b : to take in and consume by or as if by suction a vacuum cleaner sucking up dirt suck up a few beers opponents say that malls suck the life out of downtown areas— Michael Knight

intransitive verb

1 : to draw something in by or as if by exerting a suction force especially : to draw milk from a breast or udder with the mouth
2 : to make a sound or motion associated with or caused by suction his pipe sucked wetly flanks sucked in and out, the long nose resting on his paws— Virginia Woolf
3 : to act in an obsequious manner when they want votes … the candidates come sucking around— W. G. Hardy usually used with up sucked up to the boss
4 slang, sometimes vulgar : to be objectionable or inadequate our lifestyle sucksPlayboy people who went said it sucked— H. S. Thompson
suck it up
: to make the effort required to do or deal with something difficult or unpleasant

suck

noun

Definition of suck (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : a sucking movement or force
2 : the act of sucking

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Synonyms & Antonyms for suck

Synonyms: Verb

Antonyms: Verb

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Examples of suck in a Sentence

Verb sucking milk through a straw a toddler sucking his thumb She just sucked her teeth and stared. She sucked on an orange slice. I sucked a cough drop. The tide almost sucked us out to sea. The boat was sucked under the water in the storm. These plants suck moisture from the soil. The fan sucks smoke from the air. a vacuum cleaner that sucks up water as well as dirt Noun He took a suck on his pipe.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Verb The ticks attach to moose in late summer and early fall, and suck their blood over the winter. Keith Matheny, Detroit Free Press, 12 July 2021 In response, the Alaska Department of Natural Resources has approved the use of about 100 thermosyphons — tubes that suck heat out of permafrost — to keep the frozen slope in place and prevent further damage to the pipeline’s support structure. NBC News, 11 July 2021 Even insects that suck plant sap are forced to excrete surplus sugars, in the form of liquids known as honeydew or lerp. Ed Yong, The Atlantic, 8 July 2021 The tax machine has many gears, and almost all of them turn steadily to suck dollars out of and away from local pockets. Dana Kelley, Arkansas Online, 25 June 2021 Although turbochargers often suck the soul out of great-sounding engines (see the transition from the nat-asp 458 to turbo’d 488), Ferrari says the new V-6 overcomes that thanks to its wide angle and redesigned exhaust system. Caleb Miller, Car and Driver, 24 June 2021 Plus, the beloved iRobot Roomba robot vacuum that can suck up dust bunnies and crumbs is going for $51 off right now. Sanah Faroke, Better Homes & Gardens, 21 June 2021 The more than $800 million structure is essentially a three-mile long tunnel that would suck water directly from the bottom of Lake Mead. Rachel Ramirez, Pedram Javaheri And Drew Kann, CNN, 17 June 2021 Becky Liu, China macro strategist for Standard Chartered, per the Financial Times, estimates the move will suck about $20 billion worth of liquidity out of China's foreign exchange market. Nicholas Gordon, Fortune, 1 June 2021 Recent Examples on the Web: Noun Maybe that explains one of the Washington women’s rowing team’s mottos this year: Embrace the suck. Matt Calkins, The Seattle Times, 29 May 2017 While these are technically DOT legal, FCA points out that the meats wear quickly on the highway, suck in the rain, and should not, under any circumstances, be used in any way, shape, or form at temperatures below 15 degrees Fahrenheit. Davey G. Johnson, Car and Driver, 23 June 2017

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'suck.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of suck

Verb

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1a

Noun

13th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for suck

Verb

Middle English suken, from Old English sūcan; akin to Old High German sūgan to suck, Latin sugere

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Time Traveler for suck

Time Traveler

The first known use of suck was before the 12th century

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Dictionary Entries Near suck

suchwise

suck

suck-bottle

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Statistics for suck

Last Updated

20 Jul 2021

Cite this Entry

“Suck.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/suck. Accessed 31 Jul. 2021.

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More Definitions for suck

suck

verb

English Language Learners Definition of suck

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to pull (liquid, air, etc.) into your mouth especially while your lips are forming a small hole
: to pull on (something in your mouth) with the muscles of your lips and mouth
: to let (something, such as candy or medicine) stay in your mouth as it melts

suck

noun

English Language Learners Definition of suck (Entry 2 of 2)

: an act of sucking

suck

verb
\ ˈsək How to pronounce suck (audio) \
sucked; sucking

Kids Definition of suck

1 : to draw something (as liquid or air) into the mouth He sucked chocolate milk through a straw.
2 : to draw liquid from by action of the mouth He sucked an orange.
3 : to allow to dissolve gradually in the mouth suck a lollipop
4 : to put (as a thumb) into the mouth and draw on as if drawing liquid
5 : to take in by or as if by absorption or suction Plants suck moisture from the soil.

suck

transitive verb
\ ˈsək How to pronounce suck (audio) \

Medical Definition of suck

1 : to draw (as liquid) into the mouth through a suction force produced by movements of the lips and tongue sucked milk from her mother's breast
2 : to draw out by suction

intransitive verb

: to draw something in by or as if by exerting a suction force especially : to draw milk from a breast or udder with the mouth

More from Merriam-Webster on suck

Nglish: Translation of suck for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of suck for Arabic Speakers

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