suck

verb
\ ˈsək How to pronounce suck (audio) \
sucked; sucking; sucks

Definition of suck

 (Entry 1 of 2)

transitive verb

1a : to draw (something, such as liquid) into the mouth through a suction force produced by movements of the lips and tongue sucked milk from his mother's breast
b : to draw something from or consume by such movements suck an orange suck a lollipop
c : to apply the mouth to in order to or as if to suck out a liquid sucked his burned finger
2a : to draw by or as if by suction when a receding wave sucks the sand from under your feet— Kenneth Brower inadvertently sucked into the … intrigue— Martin Levin
b : to take in and consume by or as if by suction a vacuum cleaner sucking up dirt suck up a few beers opponents say that malls suck the life out of downtown areas— Michael Knight

intransitive verb

1 : to draw something in by or as if by exerting a suction force especially : to draw milk from a breast or udder with the mouth
2 : to make a sound or motion associated with or caused by suction his pipe sucked wetly flanks sucked in and out, the long nose resting on his paws— Virginia Woolf
3 : to act in an obsequious manner when they want votes … the candidates come sucking around— W. G. Hardy usually used with up sucked up to the boss
4 slang, sometimes vulgar : to be objectionable or inadequate our lifestyle sucksPlayboy people who went said it sucked— H. S. Thompson
suck it up
: to make the effort required to do or deal with something difficult or unpleasant

suck

noun

Definition of suck (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : a sucking movement or force
2 : the act of sucking

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Synonyms & Antonyms for suck

Synonyms: Verb

Antonyms: Verb

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Examples of suck in a Sentence

Verb sucking milk through a straw a toddler sucking his thumb She just sucked her teeth and stared. She sucked on an orange slice. I sucked a cough drop. The tide almost sucked us out to sea. The boat was sucked under the water in the storm. These plants suck moisture from the soil. The fan sucks smoke from the air. a vacuum cleaner that sucks up water as well as dirt Noun He took a suck on his pipe.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Verb Typically, as the tyre rolls along, the slits splay out and suck water up off the ground, directing it into wide grooves that are cut around the tyre’s circumference. Laurie Winkless, Forbes, "Scientists Unveil What Happens When Tyres Slide On Wet Roads," 17 Mar. 2021 Ammonia breaks down into nitrogen and hydrogen in the environment, and excess nitrogen in waterways causes damaging algae blooms, which can block sunlight and suck up oxygen for creatures and vegetation below. Christine Condon, baltimoresun.com, "Court decision will require Maryland to regulate gaseous ammonia emissions from poultry farms," 16 Mar. 2021 Its onboard cameras and sensors suck up vast amounts of data on what’s happening on the ground. Annie Jacobsen, Wired, "Palantir’s God’s-Eye View of Afghanistan," 20 Jan. 2021 But just as friction saps energy from a car, particle collisions suck helicity out of viscous fluids like water and plasma. Natalie Wolchover, Scientific American, "Mysteries of Fluid Flow Unraveled by Knots," 11 Dec. 2013 The vacuum will suck the item up, and the stocking will prevent it from entering the hose. Jeff Harper, chicagotribune.com, "Creative things you can do with a vacuum," 6 Mar. 2021 Theatrical presidents and quotable senators suck up all the limelight in Washington, but staff members, administrators and bureaucrats actually keep the government running. Fritz Hahn, Washington Post, "18 books that capture the spirit and essence of living in D.C.," 4 Mar. 2021 The two tech companies suck up the majority of U.S. digital advertising dollars, which — among other problems — has hurt publishers. NBC News, "Facebook says it will pay $1B over 3 years to news industry," 25 Feb. 2021 Our lives in 2020 would especially suck without Kelly Clarkson's covers of every hit known to man. Billboard Staff, Billboard, "Kelly Clarkson's 10 Best 'Kellyoke' Covers of 2020," 15 Dec. 2020 Recent Examples on the Web: Noun Maybe that explains one of the Washington women’s rowing team’s mottos this year: Embrace the suck. Matt Calkins, The Seattle Times, "Washington’s Triple Crown in rowing well earned," 29 May 2017 While these are technically DOT legal, FCA points out that the meats wear quickly on the highway, suck in the rain, and should not, under any circumstances, be used in any way, shape, or form at temperatures below 15 degrees Fahrenheit. Davey G. Johnson, Car and Driver, "Dodge Demands Owners Sign Waiver When Ordering Demon," 23 June 2017

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'suck.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of suck

Verb

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1a

Noun

13th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for suck

Verb

Middle English suken, from Old English sūcan; akin to Old High German sūgan to suck, Latin sugere

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Time Traveler for suck

Time Traveler

The first known use of suck was before the 12th century

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Statistics for suck

Last Updated

3 Apr 2021

Cite this Entry

“Suck.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/suck. Accessed 13 Apr. 2021.

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More Definitions for suck

suck

verb

English Language Learners Definition of suck

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to pull (liquid, air, etc.) into your mouth especially while your lips are forming a small hole
: to pull on (something in your mouth) with the muscles of your lips and mouth
: to let (something, such as candy or medicine) stay in your mouth as it melts

suck

noun

English Language Learners Definition of suck (Entry 2 of 2)

: an act of sucking

suck

verb
\ ˈsək How to pronounce suck (audio) \
sucked; sucking

Kids Definition of suck

1 : to draw something (as liquid or air) into the mouth He sucked chocolate milk through a straw.
2 : to draw liquid from by action of the mouth He sucked an orange.
3 : to allow to dissolve gradually in the mouth suck a lollipop
4 : to put (as a thumb) into the mouth and draw on as if drawing liquid
5 : to take in by or as if by absorption or suction Plants suck moisture from the soil.
\ ˈsək How to pronounce suck (audio) \

Medical Definition of suck

1 : to draw (as liquid) into the mouth through a suction force produced by movements of the lips and tongue sucked milk from her mother's breast
2 : to draw out by suction

intransitive verb

: to draw something in by or as if by exerting a suction force especially : to draw milk from a breast or udder with the mouth

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More from Merriam-Webster on suck

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for suck

Nglish: Translation of suck for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of suck for Arabic Speakers

Comments on suck

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