flit

verb
\ ˈflit How to pronounce flit (audio) \
flitted; flitting

Definition of flit

intransitive verb

1 : to pass quickly or abruptly from one place or condition to another
2 archaic : alter, shift
3 : to move in an erratic fluttering manner

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Other Words from flit

flit noun

Examples of flit in a Sentence

butterflies flitting around the garden The hummingbird flitted from flower to flower. She was always flitting around the kitchen.
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Recent Examples on the Web

Younger people flitted past the stands or slipped into a nearby coffee shop, but the crowd was mostly elderly, ojii-sans and obaa-sans, grandfathers and grandmothers. Neil Shea, National Geographic, "Tokyo became a megacity by reinventing itself," 12 June 2019 The talking points flitted from caring for the city's elderly to Dallas' cultural and racial diversity, to its need to be more welcoming, to its emerging status as a beacon of science and technology. Michael Granberry, Dallas News, "The Festival of Books and Ideas serves up a 5-day buffet of ideas for Dallas," 6 June 2019 There are writers who specialize in variety, flitting from genre to genre and reinventing themselves with every book. Ryu Spaeth, The New Republic, "Aleksandar Hemon’s Lost Eden," 6 June 2019 Dozens of orange robotic arms dance and stamp, flitting through intricate steps that turn sheet metal into knives. Tom Fairless, WSJ, "A Tale of Two Companies—and Two Countries," 20 Jan. 2019 Steam rose from two smokestacks, the crew flitted among three decks, and a horn announced that departure was imminent. Erik Maza, Town & Country, "Chanel Sets Sail for New York City," 15 Nov. 2018 The Lashes Have It At Valentino, hearts stopped for many reasons, not least of which were the larger-the-life plume lashes dreamily flitting about. Lauren Valenti, Vogue, "7 Couture Beauty Looks That Defined the Paris Runways," 24 Jan. 2019 Backed by hefty trust funds, party girl Sara spent her twenties flitting around the globe trying to find herself while the more serious Clare pursued a career as an elite equestrian show jumper. Fox News, "Heiress used family fortune to finance sex cult, feds say," 25 July 2018 They are followed in this endeavor by a Journal reporter (Annabelle Wallis), who apparently is able to drop everything and flit around the country at a moment's notice. Brian Lowry, CNN, "'Tag' has moments but doesn't leave a mark," 14 June 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'flit.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of flit

13th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for flit

Middle English flitten, of Scandinavian origin; akin to Old Norse flytjask to move, Old English flēotan to float

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Statistics for flit

Last Updated

16 Jun 2019

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Time Traveler for flit

The first known use of flit was in the 13th century

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More Definitions for flit

flit

verb

English Language Learners Definition of flit

: to move or fly quickly from one place or thing to another

flit

verb
\ ˈflit How to pronounce flit (audio) \
flitted; flitting

Kids Definition of flit

: to move, pass, or fly quickly from one place or thing to another Hummingbirds flitted from flower to flower.

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More from Merriam-Webster on flit

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with flit

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for flit

Spanish Central: Translation of flit

Nglish: Translation of flit for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of flit for Arabic Speakers

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