excite

verb
ex·​cite | \ ik-ˈsīt How to pronounce excite (audio) , ek-\
excited; exciting

Definition of excite

transitive verb

1a : to call to activity
b : to rouse to an emotional response scenes to excite the hardest man to pity
c : to arouse (something, such as a strong emotional response) by appropriate stimuli excite enthusiasm for the new regime— Arthur Knight
2a : energize excite an electromagnet
b : to produce a magnetic field in excite a dynamo
3 : to increase the activity of (something, such as a living organism) : stimulate
4 : to raise (an atomic nucleus, an atom, a molecule, etc.) to a higher energy level

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Choose the Right Synonym for excite

provoke, excite, stimulate, pique, quicken mean to arouse as if by pricking. provoke directs attention to the response called forth. my stories usually provoke laughter excite implies a stirring up or moving profoundly. news that excited anger and frustration stimulate suggests a rousing out of lethargy, quiescence, or indifference. stimulating conversation pique suggests stimulating by mild irritation or challenge. that remark piqued my interest quicken implies beneficially stimulating and making active or lively. the high salary quickened her desire to have the job

Examples of excite in a Sentence

ideas that excite young people Our announcement excited the children. The posters excited much interest in the show.
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Recent Examples on the Web

We were excited when the drive dropped to $100 over the summer. Ian Paul, PCWorld, "Two of our favorite SSDs are cheaper than ever today," 2 Oct. 2018 Dalessandro, an author not given to understatement, is excited about the possibility. Leah Garchik, SFChronicle.com, "Talk of TV series based on ‘1906’," 25 June 2018 Commercial impact The commercial companies involved in Thursday's announcement were understandably excited by the new program. Eric Berger, Ars Technica, "NASA takes a tangible step back toward the Moon with commercial program," 29 Nov. 2018 Kevin Huerter said he is also excited by the possibility of playing with Young, a consensus first-team All-American who as a freshman last season was the first player in NCAA history to lead the nation in both scoring and assists. Don Markus, baltimoresun.com, "Former Terps Huerter and Jackson will start their NBA careers with rebuilding teams," 22 June 2018 Lloyd expects that the screening and Q&A will get new viewers excited about the film. Laura Latzko, azcentral, "A night with Christopher Lloyd of 'Back to the Future,' plus more fun events this weekend," 10 July 2018 John got excited as only an engineer can about the 56-volt arc-lithium battery with triple-cell technology. Marni Jameson, OrlandoSentinel.com, "Next generation of homeowners go for greener yard tools," 6 July 2018 While talking with Natalie Morales and Kit Hoover on Access Live, Andrews explained that Harding being excited about the smallest details of the show is refreshing. Michelle R. Martinelli, For The Win, "Why Erin Andrews was 'pumped' to meet Tonya Harding on DWTS," 2 May 2018 In other words, your goal should be your goal—something that you personally are excited about and realistically able to achieve—not someone else’s. Jenny Mccoy, SELF, "How to Set Realistic Fitness Goals You’ll Actually Achieve, According to Top Trainers," 3 Jan. 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'excite.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of excite

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

History and Etymology for excite

Middle English, from Anglo-French exciter, from Latin excitare, from ex- + citare to rouse — more at cite

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Statistics for excite

Last Updated

22 Mar 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for excite

The first known use of excite was in the 14th century

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More Definitions for excite

excite

verb

English Language Learners Definition of excite

: to cause feelings of enthusiasm in (someone) : to make (someone) feel energetic and eager to do something
: to cause (a particular emotion or reaction) to be felt or to happen
: to increase the activity of (something, such as nerve tissue)

excite

verb
ex·​cite | \ ik-ˈsīt How to pronounce excite (audio) \
excited; exciting

Kids Definition of excite

1 : to stir up feeling in The announcement excited the children.
2 : to increase the activity of This chemical excites nerve cells.
ex·​cite | \ ik-ˈsīt How to pronounce excite (audio) \
excited; exciting

Medical Definition of excite

1 : to increase the activity of (as a living organism) : stimulate
2 : to raise (as an atomic nucleus, an atom, or a molecule) to a higher energy level

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More from Merriam-Webster on excite

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with excite

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for excite

Spanish Central: Translation of excite

Nglish: Translation of excite for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of excite for Arabic Speakers

Comments on excite

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