endemic

adjective
en·​dem·​ic | \ en-ˈde-mik How to pronounce endemic (audio) , in- \

Definition of endemic

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1a : belonging or native to a particular people or country
b : characteristic of or prevalent in a particular field, area, or environment problems endemic to translation the self-indulgence endemic in the film industry
2 : restricted or peculiar to a locality or region endemic diseases an endemic species

endemic

noun
en·​dem·​ic | \ en-ˈde-mik How to pronounce endemic (audio) , in- \

Definition of endemic (Entry 2 of 2)

: an organism that is restricted or peculiar to a locality or region : an endemic organism

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Other Words from endemic

Adjective

endemically \ en-​ˈde-​mi-​k(ə-​)lē How to pronounce endemically (audio) , in-​ \ adverb
endemicity \ ˌen-​ˌde-​ˈmi-​sə-​tē How to pronounce endemicity (audio) , -​də-​ˈmi-​ \ noun
endemism \ ˈen-​də-​ˌmi-​zəm How to pronounce endemism (audio) \ noun

Synonyms & Antonyms for endemic

Synonyms: Adjective

Antonyms: Adjective

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Choose the Right Synonym for endemic

Adjective

native, indigenous, endemic, aboriginal mean belonging to a locality. native implies birth or origin in a place or region and may suggest compatibility with it. native tribal customs indigenous applies to that which is not only native but which, as far as can be determined, has never been introduced or brought from elsewhere. indigenous plants endemic implies being peculiar to a region. a disease endemic in Africa aboriginal implies having no known others preceding in occupancy of a particular region. the aboriginal peoples of Australia

Did You Know?

Adjective

If you translate it literally, endemic means "in the population." It derives from the Greek endēmos, which joins en, meaning "in," and dēmos, meaning "population." "Endemic" is often used to characterize diseases that are generally found in a particular area; malaria, for example, is said to be endemic to tropical and subtropical regions. This use differs from that of the related word epidemic in that it indicates a more or less constant presence in a particular population or area rather than a sudden, severe outbreak within that region or group. The word is also used by biologists to characterize the plant and animal species that are only found in a given area.

Examples of endemic in a Sentence

Adjective Divorce has become so endemic in our society that a whole lore has risen up around it: that divorce is a temporary crisis; that so many children have experienced their parents' divorce that children nowadays do not worry much about it; that in fact it makes things easier, and it is itself a mere rite of passage; that if the parents feel better, so will the children. — Elisabeth Lasch-Quinn, New Republic, 6 May 2002 Situated only 250 miles off the coast of Africa, Madagascar is biologically unique. Not only does it have a rich animal and plant life, it also houses a huge number of endemic species found nowhere else on earth. — Jim Milliot et al., Publishers Weekly, 15 May 2000 The rap performers I enjoy are those who emphasize production values, songcraft and that quality of playfulness endemic to all good pop. — Francis Davis, Atlantic, October 1993 the fish is not an endemic species of the lake, and it is rapidly devouring the native trout population
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Recent Examples on the Web: Adjective Graft became endemic during the rule of former President Jacob Zuma, who Ramaphosa replaced in 2018. Antony Sguazzin, Bloomberg.com, "South Africa Widens Corruption Crackdown, Charging Key Figures," 1 Oct. 2020 The final result is a list of state-specific cuisines, each based on a longstanding diaspora (like Vietnamese food in Louisiana), an Indigenous community (Abenaki in Vermont), or something totally endemic (New Mexican in New Mexico). Cnt Editors, Condé Nast Traveler, "50 States, 50 Cuisines: The Food Worth Traveling For in Every State," 14 Sep. 2020 The site continues to sustain desert wildlife, including several endemic species. Rafael Carranza, The Arizona Republic, "Feds file charges against 2 O'odham women for blocking border wall construction," 17 Sep. 2020 Studies show that boredom is endemic on mental health wards, as is loneliness, and both issues have become all the more acute with COVID-19 placing restrictions on visitors. Daisy Schofield, refinery29.com, "Inside The Complex World Of ‘Psych Ward’ TikTok," 13 Sep. 2020 One laboratory study found that carrying Wolbachia enhanced the infection rate of West Nile virus in the Culex tarsalis species of mosquito, which is endemic to North America. Jon Emont, WSJ, "How to Fight the Deadly Dengue Virus? Make Your Own Mosquitoes.," 6 Sep. 2020 Though some of those problems are more endemic to near-shore fish farms, concerns remain among environmentalists and many Florida residents that deep-sea cultivation would prove even more complex, but with less oversight. Patrik Jonsson, The Christian Science Monitor, "Deep-water fish farming in the Gulf of Mexico: Who benefits?," 31 Aug. 2020 Graft became endemic during the nine-year rule of Ramaphosa’s predecessor, Jacob Zuma. Michael Cohen, Bloomberg.com, "Ramaphosa Says ANC Is Accused No. 1 in South African Graft," 29 Aug. 2020 And if vaccine immunity is only temporary and endemic coronavirus strains require regular shots for years, the companies will make plenty of money down the road, critics say. Jay Hancock, Fortune, "Oxford’s COVID vaccine deal with AstraZeneca raises concerns about access and pricing," 24 Aug. 2020 Recent Examples on the Web: Noun It’s late July in 2019, and the air buzzes with the chitters of the island’s endemic singing voles. Sarah Gilman, Smithsonian Magazine, "The Alaskan Island That Humans Can’t Conquer," 7 Oct. 2020 The mass vaccination program quickly squelched the disease in Europe and North America, but nearly a decade later, the disease remained endemic in much of Africa, Asia, and South America, with tens of thousands of cases still reported each year. Nsikan Akpan, National Geographic, "A 'herd mentality' can’t stop the COVID-19 pandemic. Neither can a weak vaccine.," 2 Oct. 2020 Most individuals in tuberculosis-endemic countries receive it during infancy or early childhood. Miriam Fauzia, USA TODAY, "Fact check: Tuberculosis is more dangerous than COVID-19 but context matters," 10 May 2019 That wouldn’t be because the retraining program will fix San Antonio’s endemic poverty. Greg Jefferson, ExpressNews.com, "Jefferson: ‘Not very reassuring to a taxpayer’ — San Antonio’s job retraining program, off to a faltering start, holds promise but has to earn voter support," 18 Sep. 2020 Chronic disease is the largest contributor, according to the document, with the city’s endemic gun violence as the second leading reason for the disparity. Annie Sweeney, chicagotribune.com, "Chicago’s history of systemic racism blamed for nearly 9-year life expectancy gap between Black and white residents, according to new report," 17 Sep. 2020 In On Liberty, John Stuart Mill is careful to acknowledge the structural source of pressures on speech: the tyranny of the majority is not a product of evil illiberal forces, but a danger endemic to political freedom. Harper's Magazine, "On Justice and Open Debate," 15 Sep. 2020 The coalition party leaders said that the priority of the new government will be economic development and the fight against endemic corruption which has been one of the main burdens of previous governments. Predrag Milic, Star Tribune, "Government agreed, Montenegro to keep pro-Western course.," 9 Sep. 2020 His work with the endemic coronaviruses, relatives of SARS-CoV-2, shows that children are infected with their first coronavirus by three and get all four of the common coronaviruses by 20. Jim Morrison, Smithsonian Magazine, "What Scientists Know About How Children Spread COVID-19," 23 July 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'endemic.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of endemic

Adjective

1759, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Noun

1926, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for endemic

Adjective

borrowed from French & New Latin; French endémique, borrowed from New Latin endēmicus, from Medieval Latin *endēmia "disease fixed in one locality" + New Latin -icus -ic entry 1; Medieval Latin *endēmia, probably from Greek éndēmos "at home, living in a place, native, confined to one area (of a disease, in galen)" (from en- en- entry 2 + -dēmos, adjective derivative of dêmos "district, country, people") on the model of epidēmia "disease affecting a large number of individuals" — more at demo-, epidemic entry 1

Note: Medieval Latin *endēmia is presumed on the basis of Middle French endemie, occurring in Thomas Le Forestier's Le regime contre epidimie et pestilence (Rouen, 1495) (see Revue de linguistique romane, vol. 36 [1972], p. 231).

Noun

derivative of endemic entry 1

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Time Traveler for endemic

Time Traveler

The first known use of endemic was in 1759

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Last Updated

14 Oct 2020

Cite this Entry

“Endemic.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/endemic. Accessed 22 Oct. 2020.

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More Definitions for endemic

endemic

adjective
How to pronounce endemic (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of endemic

: growing or existing in a certain place or region
: common in a particular area or field

endemic

adjective
en·​dem·​ic | \ en-ˈdem-ik, in- How to pronounce endemic (audio) \

Medical Definition of endemic

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: restricted or peculiar to a locality or region endemic diseases an endemic species — compare epidemic sense 1, sporadic sense 1

Other Words from endemic

endemically \ -​ˈdem-​i-​k(ə-​)lē How to pronounce endemically (audio) \ adverb

endemic

noun

Medical Definition of endemic (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : an endemic disease or an instance of its occurrence
2 : an endemic organism

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