educate

verb
ed·​u·​cate | \ ˈe-jə-ˌkāt How to pronounce educate (audio) \
educated; educating

Definition of educate

transitive verb

1a : to provide schooling for chose to educate their children at home
b : to train by formal instruction and supervised practice especially in a skill, trade, or profession
2a : to develop mentally, morally, or aesthetically especially by instruction
b : to provide with information : inform educating themselves about changes in the industry
3 : to persuade or condition to feel, believe, or act in a desired way educate the public to support our position

intransitive verb

: to educate a person or thing

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Choose the Right Synonym for educate

teach, instruct, educate, train, discipline, school mean to cause to acquire knowledge or skill. teach applies to any manner of imparting information or skill so that others may learn. taught us a lot about our planet instruct suggests methodical or formal teaching. instructs raw recruits in military drill educate implies development of the mind. more things than formal schooling serve to educate a person train stresses instruction and drill with a specific end in view. trained foreign pilots to operate the new aircraft discipline implies training in habits of order and precision. a disciplined mind school implies training or disciplining especially in what is hard to master. schooled the horse in five gaits

Examples of educate in a Sentence

Parents trust schools to educate their children. The job of our public schools is to educate.
Recent Examples on the Web But legislators critical of the measure noted that lawmakers did nothing this session to close the vaccine hesitancy gap, encourage people to get vaccinated, or educate people about vaccines. al, "Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis bans vaccine passports, ends local COVID restrictions," 3 May 2021 Intent of page is to help educate viewers about issues facing our state. James Brooks, Anchorage Daily News, "Chugiak woman sues state Sen. Reinbold over Facebook user ban, deleted comments," 1 May 2021 Lillis’ bigger strategy is to encourage restaurateurs to join him in the effort to educate women about where to get help. Sarah Blaskovich, Dallas News, "Dallas restaurants join coalition to help victims of domestic violence," 30 Apr. 2021 Developers, lawmakers, community leaders and other stakeholders must work together to actively educate Americans about the significant communal, environmental and societal benefits that quality affordable units confer. Jeremy Bronfman, Forbes, "The Moment To Close The Affordable Housing Gap Is Now: Here’s How We Can Start," 28 Apr. 2021 The two towns, hugging opposite sides of the Hackensack River, have nearly the same number of residents and educate about the same number of students. New York Times, "‘Virtual Learning Has Done Nothing — Nothing — for My Son’," 28 Apr. 2021 The two towns, hugging opposite sides of the Hackensack River, have nearly the same number of residents and educate about the same number of students. BostonGlobe.com, "Children with autism miss out as school districts make their own rules," 28 Apr. 2021 O’Toole, who spent years as chief of operations for the City of Cleveland’s Fire Department, said home fires continue to wreak destruction across the country, despite ongoing efforts to educate residents about fire safety. cleveland, "American Red Cross volunteers ‘Sound the Alarm’ as part of free, nationwide fire safety campaign," 28 Apr. 2021 One way to educate people is to help clear up misconceptions about C-sections. Victoria Uwumarogie, Essence, "It's "The Easy Way Out" And Other Misconceptions About C-Sections Debunked By An OBGYN," 28 Apr. 2021

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'educate.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of educate

15th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1a

History and Etymology for educate

Middle English, to rear, from Latin educatus, past participle of educare to rear, educate, from educere to lead forth — more at educe

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Learn More about educate

Time Traveler for educate

Time Traveler

The first known use of educate was in the 15th century

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Statistics for educate

Last Updated

7 May 2021

Cite this Entry

“Educate.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/educate. Accessed 10 May. 2021.

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More Definitions for educate

educate

verb

English Language Learners Definition of educate

: to teach (someone) especially in a school, college, or university
: to give (someone) information about something : to train (someone) to do something

educate

verb
ed·​u·​cate | \ ˈe-jə-ˌkāt How to pronounce educate (audio) \
educated; educating

Kids Definition of educate

1 : to provide schooling for Her parents are educating her at home.
2 : to develop the mind and morals of especially by formal instruction : teach Teachers work hard to educate their students.
3 : to provide with necessary information The public should be educated about how to save energy.

Other Words from educate

educator \ ˈe-​jə-​ˌkā-​tər \ noun

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Comments on educate

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