educate

verb
ed·​u·​cate | \ˈe-jə-ˌkāt \
educated; educating

Definition of educate 

transitive verb

1a : to provide schooling for chose to educate their children at home

b : to train by formal instruction and supervised practice especially in a skill, trade, or profession

2a : to develop mentally, morally, or aesthetically especially by instruction

b : to provide with information : inform educating themselves about changes in the industry

3 : to persuade or condition to feel, believe, or act in a desired way educate the public to support our position

intransitive verb

: to educate a person or thing

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Choose the Right Synonym for educate

teach, instruct, educate, train, discipline, school mean to cause to acquire knowledge or skill. teach applies to any manner of imparting information or skill so that others may learn. taught us a lot about our planet instruct suggests methodical or formal teaching. instructs raw recruits in military drill educate implies development of the mind. more things than formal schooling serve to educate a person train stresses instruction and drill with a specific end in view. trained foreign pilots to operate the new aircraft discipline implies training in habits of order and precision. a disciplined mind school implies training or disciplining especially in what is hard to master. schooled the horse in five gaits

Examples of educate in a Sentence

Parents trust schools to educate their children. The job of our public schools is to educate.

Recent Examples on the Web

And like today, many in the 19th Century anti-vaccination movement hailed from large cities, were educated and earned a decent living. Sara Novak, Discover Magazine, "The Long History of America's Anti-Vaccination Movement," 24 Nov. 2018 For me, educating yourself on the issues that strike a passion within you has always been the foundation of activism and civic engagement. Hailey Colborn, Seventeen, "Miss Teen USA Hailey Colborn On Why You NEED To Get Out There and Vote," 25 Oct. 2018 What can people do to educate young people about the perils of this? Fox News, "Lynne Patton responds to Omarosa audio tape," 15 Aug. 2018 While highly educated African-Americans are now more successful than ever, the bottom appears to have fallen out for poor blacks. The Economist, "The wage gap between white and black men is growing wider," 5 July 2018 But good punchers were hard to find and usually better educated than their peers. Marie Hicks, The Verge, "The long history behind the Google Walkout," 9 Nov. 2018 The campaign's work, which includes planned legislation, educating consumers, and raising awareness about what happens during animal testing, is aimed at ending the practice of animal testing within five years. Lauren Rearick, Allure, "Unilever Announced Its Support of a Global Ban on Animal-Tested Cosmetics," 12 Oct. 2018 Volunteers of all political stripes, and those who own guns as well as those who do not, educate and advocate for keeping families safe. Kaitlin Menza, Redbook, "Everything You Need to Know Before Voting in the Midterm Elections," 10 Oct. 2018 But before Hello! West Hartford, the couple lived that mission of educating others about their Indonesian culture. Mikaela Porter, Courant Community, "Community Rallies Around West Hartford Man In Sanctuary Nearly Eight Months," 9 July 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'educate.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of educate

15th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1a

History and Etymology for educate

Middle English, to rear, from Latin educatus, past participle of educare to rear, educate, from educere to lead forth — more at educe

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Dictionary Entries near educate

Educabilia

educable

educand

educate

educated

educatee

education

Statistics for educate

Last Updated

3 Dec 2018

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for educate

The first known use of educate was in the 15th century

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More Definitions for educate

educate

verb

English Language Learners Definition of educate

: to teach (someone) especially in a school, college, or university

: to give (someone) information about something : to train (someone) to do something

educate

verb
ed·​u·​cate | \ˈe-jə-ˌkāt \
educated; educating

Kids Definition of educate

1 : to provide schooling for Her parents are educating her at home.

2 : to develop the mind and morals of especially by formal instruction : teach Teachers work hard to educate their students.

3 : to provide with necessary information The public should be educated about how to save energy.

Other Words from educate

educator \ˈe-​jə-​ˌkā-​tər \ noun

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More from Merriam-Webster on educate

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with educate

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for educate

Spanish Central: Translation of educate

Nglish: Translation of educate for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of educate for Arabic Speakers

Comments on educate

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