dysphoric

adjective

dys·​phor·​ic dis-ˈfȯr-ik How to pronounce dysphoric (audio)
-ˈfär-
: very unhappy, uneasy, or dissatisfied : marked or characterized by dysphoria
a dysphoric mood
a dysphoric person
see also premenstrual dysphoric disorder

Examples of dysphoric in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web In July, an international group of doctors from Europe, Africa, and the United States emphasized that psychological therapy ought to be the first line of treatment for gender dysphoric youth, contradicting other groups such as the Endocrine Society. Gabrielle M. Etzel, Washington Examiner, 13 Jan. 2024 Its use can be dysphoric or derogatory, a way to express the disappointment of missing the mark or to throw an insult back at transphobes. Namwali Serpell, The New York Review of Books, 12 Oct. 2023 There were a few people [who] were dysphoric. Fox News Staff, Fox News, 17 July 2022 Every table in the tiny, high-design dining room is set with a bowl of pins printed with pronouns; the bathroom features a fun-house mirror meant to protect trans diners from feeling dysphoric, and an apothecary jar filled with fentanyl test strips. Hannah Goldfield, The New Yorker, 24 Mar. 2023 On the other side, every major medical group including the American Medical Association, the American Academy of Pediatrics and the American Psychiatric Association, supports transgender medical treatments for gender dysphoric youths. Chris Pandolfo, Fox News, 30 Mar. 2023 Those heroines were dissociated, dysphoric. Katy Waldman, The New Yorker, 8 Aug. 2022 Like Pal, rats are also awoken by dysphoric images that taunt them and haunt them in their sleep. Time, 28 Dec. 2022 The swift response from the scientific community made both points clear—with even those who support hormones and surgery for gender-dysphoric youth noting that Dr. Turban’s shoddy science undermined their cause. Leor Sapir, WSJ, 17 Aug. 2022

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'dysphoric.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

Etymology

dysphoria + -ic entry 1

First Known Use

1888, in the meaning defined above

Time Traveler
The first known use of dysphoric was in 1888

Dictionary Entries Near dysphoric

dysphoria

dysphoric

dysphotic

Cite this Entry

“Dysphoric.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/dysphoric. Accessed 22 Apr. 2024.

Medical Definition

dysphoric

adjective
dys·​phor·​ic dis-ˈfȯr-ik How to pronounce dysphoric (audio)
-ˈfär-
1
: very unhappy, uneasy, or dissatisfied : marked or characterized by dysphoria (see dysphoria sense 1)
… the stress and dysphoric moods that are experienced by some mothers have the potential to influence their immune balance.Maureen W. Groer and Mitzi W. Davis, Journal of Obstetric, Gynecologic and Neonatal Nursing
see also premenstrual dysphoric disorder
2
: of, relating to, or characterized by gender dysphoria
… it is important to consider that the transgender male patient may have the same contraceptive requirements as a cisgender female: it is even more important to consider how this may be a dysphoric experience for our patient and devise solutions through which our healthcare systems can mitigate this harm.Madeleine Noelle Olding et al., Teaching and Learning in Medicine
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