dysphoria

noun
dys·​pho·​ria | \ dis-ˈfȯr-ē-ə How to pronounce dysphoria (audio) \

Definition of dysphoria

: a state of feeling very unhappy, uneasy, or dissatisfied — see gender dysphoria

Examples of dysphoria in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web Another might experience dysphoria as mainly visual but still enjoy vaginal receptive intercourse; phalloplasty without vaginectomy could meet this need with fewer procedures. New York Times, 10 May 2022 Next his concerned parents are checking him into a treatment center for those with species dysphoria. Bill Goodykoontz, Detroit Free Press, 3 Dec. 2021 Next his concerned parents are checking him into a treatment center for those with species dysphoria. Bill Goodykoontz, Detroit Free Press, 3 Dec. 2021 Finally, abandoning the dysphoria diagnosis for insurance reimbursement would also recognize the reality of the trans experience: There is no single way to be trans, just as there is no one way to transition or access medically necessary care. Dallas Ducar, STAT, 15 Mar. 2022 But Cage calibrates his dysphoria with athletic precision, and its psychic toll is high. Dan Piepenbring, Harper’s Magazine , 18 Jan. 2022 Next his concerned parents are checking him into a treatment center for those with species dysphoria. Bill Goodykoontz, Detroit Free Press, 3 Dec. 2021 Irvin struggled with depression and dysphoria from their outward feminine shape, particularly their chest, not matching their inner male gender identity. Courtney Tanner, The Salt Lake Tribune, 28 Jan. 2022 After the birth, Janet complained of hemorrhaging and dysphoria, but doctors assured her that both her bleeding and her blues were normal. Ariel Levy, The New Yorker, 10 Jan. 2022 See More

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'dysphoria.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

First Known Use of dysphoria

circa 1842, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for dysphoria

borrowed from New Latin, borrowed from Greek dysphoría "malaise, discomfort, vexation," from dýsphoros "hard to bear, grievous" (from dys- dys- + -phoros, nominal ablaut derivative from the base of phérein "to carry, bear") + -ia -ia entry 1 — more at bear entry 2

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Time Traveler for dysphoria

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The first known use of dysphoria was circa 1842

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Dictionary Entries Near dysphoria

dysphonia

dysphoria

dysphoric

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Statistics for dysphoria

Last Updated

22 May 2022

Cite this Entry

“Dysphoria.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/dysphoria. Accessed 29 May. 2022.

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More Definitions for dysphoria

dysphoria

noun
dys·​pho·​ria | \ dis-ˈfōr-ē-ə, -ˈfȯr- How to pronounce dysphoria (audio) \

Medical Definition of dysphoria

: a state of feeling unwell or unhappy — compare euphoria

Other Words from dysphoria

dysphoric \ -​ˈfȯr-​ik, -​ˈfȧr-​ How to pronounce dysphoria (audio) \ adjective

More from Merriam-Webster on dysphoria

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about dysphoria

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