drench

verb
\ ˈdrench How to pronounce drench (audio) \
drenched; drenching; drenches

Definition of drench

 (Entry 1 of 2)

transitive verb

1 : to wet thoroughly (as by soaking or immersing in liquid)
2 : to soak or cover thoroughly with liquid that falls or is precipitated
3 : to fill or cover completely as if by soaking or precipitation was drenched in furs and diamonds— Richard Brautigan
4a : to administer a drench to (an animal)
b archaic : to force to drink

drench

noun

Definition of drench (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : a poisonous or medicinal drink specifically : a large dose of medicine mixed with liquid and put down the throat of an animal
2a : something that drenches
b : a quantity sufficient to drench or saturate

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Other Words from drench

Verb

drencher noun

Synonyms & Antonyms for drench

Synonyms: Verb

Antonyms: Verb

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Choose the Right Synonym for drench

Verb

soak, saturate, drench, steep, impregnate mean to permeate or be permeated with a liquid. soak implies usually prolonged immersion as for softening or cleansing. soak the garment in soapy water saturate implies a resulting effect of complete absorption until no more liquid can be held. a saturated sponge drench implies a thorough wetting by something that pours down or is poured. clothes drenched by a cloudburst steep suggests either the extraction of an essence (as of tea leaves) by the liquid or the imparting of a quality (such as a color) to the thing immersed. steep the tea for five minutes impregnate implies a thorough interpenetration of one thing by another. a cake strongly impregnated with brandy

Examples of drench in a Sentence

Verb we were drenched by the sudden rainstorm when using the carpet shampooer, wet but do not drench the carpet
Recent Examples on the Web: Verb Tropical Storm Eta drench the region, leading to rescues and some evacuations. Janice Dean, Fox News, "Tropical Storm Eta floods South Florida, man in critical condition after driving into canal," 9 Nov. 2020 Torrential tropical rain will drench the Lower Mississippi Valley, the Tennessee Valley, and even the Ohio River Valley. Paul Douglas, Star Tribune, "Shorts-Worthy Friday and a Fine Weekend as "Delta" Approaches Louisiana," 7 Oct. 2020 The man stood in his yard, watering the plants his wife had asked him to drench. Steve Straessle, Arkansas Online, "Glimpses of life," 19 Sep. 2020 Even in summer, days of rain can drench the countryside. Jen Rose Smith, National Geographic, "What is ‘friluftsliv’? How an idea of outdoor living could help us this winter," 11 Sep. 2020 The hurricane’s sluggish pace could give it more time to drench the Mississippi Delta with rain and storm surge. Author: Stacey Plaisance And Janet Mcconnaughey, Anchorage Daily News, "Sally’s threat: ‘Potentially historic’ floods, fierce winds," 15 Sep. 2020 Next, spray the foliage of plants and drench the soil in the problem area with a Garrett Juice mixture with orange oil (D-Limonene) added at 2 ounces per gallon of mix. Howard Garrett, Dallas News, "How to detox your soil after exposure to harmful fertilizers or pesticides," 24 Aug. 2020 Dozens of men gathered around as a community elder emerged from a hospital that was still drenched in blood with a list of mothers’ names. Mujib Mashal, New York Times, "Born Into Carnage, 18 Afghan Babies Face an Uncertain Fate," 13 May 2020 The title of most poisonous animal on Earth is typically given to the beautiful and deadly golden poison dart frog of Columbia—the one-inch-long frog is sometimes drenched in enough poison to kill ten grown men. Alex Fox, Smithsonian Magazine, "Toxic Newts Use Bacteria to Become Deadly Prey," 23 Apr. 2020 Recent Examples on the Web: Noun In order to get the most out of your wash, first drench your hair with water. Julie Ricevuto, Allure, "The Science of Beauty: How to Use the 7 Types of Shampoo," 25 Nov. 2020 Better yet, apply Imidacloprid systemic insecticide in mid-May as a soil drench to prevent the insects ever from getting a start. Neil Sperry, ExpressNews.com, "Down to Earth: Bagging bagworms worth the unpleasant effort," 16 Jan. 2020 The weather system from the Northwest and coast is expected to drench areas that have not been affected as much by the recent storm, including San Jose and Redwood City, according to the National Weather Service. Taylor Kate Brown, SFChronicle.com, "Bay Briefing: What’s tie-dyed, moves around and provides medical care?," 3 Dec. 2019 Police responded by shooting tear gas at protesters and deploying water cannons that stream blue-dyed water to drench protesters. Fox News, "Hong Kong police officer shot with arrow, protesters set fires as Chinese troops appear to clean streets," 18 Nov. 2019 That’s why the BBQ Burger ($14 with a side) worked best, because the load of chopped brisket on top of that desert island beef brought some fat to the party, and a good drench of barbecue sauce covered up the sins even more. Mike Sutter, ExpressNews.com, "52 Weeks of Burgers: Blue Star Brewing Co.," 5 July 2019 Some can be applied as a spray and others a drench on the soil. Tom Maccubbin, orlandosentinel.com, "Divide amaryllis bulbs at any time — but fall might be best," 15 June 2019 The third choice is to use a liquid spray or drench to kill the plant. Jeff Lowenfels, Anchorage Daily News, "Here’s what’s eating your currant bushes and ‘spitting’ on your wild roses," 13 July 2018 That’s the point of this ancient and joyous Armenian custom: to get drenched and, in turn, drench as many people as possible. Cristela Guerra, BostonGlobe.com, "Ancient Armenian water celebration comes to Watertown," 9 July 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'drench.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of drench

Verb

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at sense 4b

Noun

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for drench

Verb

Middle English, from Old English drencan; akin to Old English drincan to drink

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Time Traveler for drench

Time Traveler

The first known use of drench was before the 12th century

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Statistics for drench

Cite this Entry

“Drench.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/drench. Accessed 25 Jan. 2021.

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More Definitions for drench

drench

verb
How to pronounce drench (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of drench

: to make (someone or something) completely wet

drench

verb
\ ˈdrench How to pronounce drench (audio) \
drenched; drenching

Kids Definition of drench

: to make completely wet We had pancakes drenched in syrup.

drench

noun
\ ˈdrench How to pronounce drench (audio) \

Medical Definition of drench

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a poisonous or medicinal drink specifically : a large dose of medicine mixed with liquid and put down the throat of an animal

Medical Definition of drench (Entry 2 of 2)

: to administer a drench to (an animal)

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Comments on drench

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