distrust

noun
dis·​trust | \ (ˌ)dis-ˈtrəst How to pronounce distrust (audio) \

Definition of distrust

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: the lack or absence of trust

distrust

verb
distrusted; distrusting; distrusts

Definition of distrust (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

: to have no trust or confidence in

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Examples of distrust in a Sentence

Noun

He has a distrust of doctors. the psychic's bold claims were greeted with distrust and outright scorn

Verb

She's always distrusted their promises. we instinctively distrust those phone calls that tell us we have won a free vacation or car
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

Much like Trump’s, this ideology is carried forward through a hate of immigrants alongside a distrust of global institutions. Annalisa Merelli, Quartz, "Look to Italy to understand the dangers of Trump’s racist tweets," 17 July 2019 Their skepticism reflected a deeper distrust of an American administration that has pulled out of the Iran nuclear deal, spurning its European allies and sowing suspicion that the United States is spoiling for a fight with Iran. Mark Landler, New York Times, "U.S. Puts Iran on Notice and Weighs Response to Attack on Oil Tankers," 14 June 2019 At a time when there is deep distrust of officers, Pettit said, releasing any video quickly will help with the department’s credibility within the community. Jessica Anderson, baltimoresun.com, "New Baltimore Police policy gives Harrison a week to weigh releasing video of officer-involved shootings," 5 June 2019 This wordplay exemplifies the distrust the media have brought upon themselves. Dp Opinion, The Denver Post, "Letters: Use your vote to fight the NRA; Outrage misdirected; It’s the “illegal” immigration; Universal coverage better than all the free health care (8/7/19)," 7 Aug. 2019 The distrust has led people to flee, hide, refuse the vaccine, and even attack health care workers, seven of whom have so far been killed. Kai Kupferschmidt, Science | AAAS, "Ebola veteran promises an end to Congo’s epidemic," 6 Aug. 2019 That the press conference failed to address these widespread concerns means none of the underlying distrust of China has been dispelled. Tripti Lahiri, Quartz, "Beijing’s press conference on Hong Kong was thankfully very boring," 29 July 2019 But the report emphasized the department’s inability to investigate allegations of police misconduct — key to the public’s distrust of the department. Jessica Anderson, Washington Post, "Baltimore Police struggle to investigate their own, new consent decree report says," 26 July 2019 This is the locus of the distrust toward the rich that has built within the Democratic Party post-recession, the underlying suspicion behind the rise of millennial socialism and its superstars like Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez. Osita Nwanevu, The New Yorker, "Tom Steyer, the Democrats’ Billionaire for the People?," 14 July 2019

Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

Not many people meet those requirements either, but one who does, Shadow Chancellor John McDonnell, is widely distrusted and even feared on all sides as being more wobbly than his boss on such matters as democracy and civil liberties. John O'sullivan, National Review, "Brexit: The Rubik’s Cube of British Politics," 12 Aug. 2019 The success rate excludes those who distrusted health workers and fled, or those who couldn't be found in the first place. NBC News, "Ebola vaccine hampered by deep distrust in eastern Congo," 25 July 2019 Democrats openly disdain him as a saboteur, while many key Republicans distrust his willingness to compromise, particularly on fiscal policy. Anchorage Daily News, "Mulvaney builds ‘an empire for the right wing’ as Trump’s chief of staff," 15 July 2019 And the city that once became an unwilling symbol of urban decline is looking to the future, as locals lean on one another — and distrust government officials. Los Angeles Times, "Newsletter: Gilroy mourns," 30 July 2019 Many Hong Kongers distrust the Chinese mainland’s courts and police, which are controlled by the Communist Party, and opposition was widespread. Austin Ramzy, BostonGlobe.com, "China backs Hong Kong officials, but leaves protests for them to solve," 29 July 2019 The neighborhood that becomes a silent war zone of opioids and other drugs feeds distrust rather than trust. David Lapp, National Review, "Restoring the Marriage Ecosystem," 25 July 2019 Since then, Marshallese have generally distrusted the U.S. government’s assurances of safety. Susanne Rust, Los Angeles Times, "Radiation in parts of the Marshall Islands is far higher than Chernobyl, study says," 15 July 2019 But the scale of the second massive protest, on June 16th, showed that many Hong Kongers deeply distrust both her and the regime that pulls her strings. The Economist, "A policy U-turn puts Hong Kong’s leader in a precarious position," 20 June 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'distrust.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of distrust

Noun

1513, in the meaning defined above

Verb

1548, in the meaning defined above

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Statistics for distrust

Last Updated

9 Sep 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for distrust

The first known use of distrust was in 1513

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More Definitions for distrust

distrust

noun

English Language Learners Definition of distrust

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: lack of trust or confidence : a feeling that someone or something is not honest and cannot be trusted

distrust

verb

English Language Learners Definition of distrust (Entry 2 of 2)

: to have no trust or confidence in (someone or something)

distrust

noun
dis·​trust | \ dis-ˈtrəst How to pronounce distrust (audio) \

Kids Definition of distrust

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a lack of belief or confidence in : suspicion The enemies eyed each other with distrust.

Other Words from distrust

distrustful adjective

distrust

verb
distrusted; distrusting

Kids Definition of distrust (Entry 2 of 2)

: to have no belief or confidence in I distrust the ad's claims.

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More from Merriam-Webster on distrust

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with distrust

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for distrust

Spanish Central: Translation of distrust

Nglish: Translation of distrust for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of distrust for Arabic Speakers

Comments on distrust

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