distrust

noun
dis·​trust | \ (ˌ)dis-ˈtrəst How to pronounce distrust (audio) \

Definition of distrust

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: the lack or absence of trust

distrust

verb
distrusted; distrusting; distrusts

Definition of distrust (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

: to have no trust or confidence in

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Examples of distrust in a Sentence

Noun He has a distrust of doctors. the psychic's bold claims were greeted with distrust and outright scorn Verb She's always distrusted their promises. we instinctively distrust those phone calls that tell us we have won a free vacation or car
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun Three people with knowledge of talks with Williams told USA TODAY Sports that Williams had asked for an extension and asked for a trade after expressing his distrust over his medical care. Mike Jones, USA TODAY, "Opinion: Redskins might not deserve all blame for the Trent Williams saga," 1 Nov. 2019 And Trent Williams remains away from the team in Washington now, though his situation seems more about his distrust of that organization than anything. Dave Birkett, Detroit Free Press, "Deadline deal or not, Darius Slay's Detroit Lions tenure is destined to end soon," 29 Oct. 2019 As the business expanded, the Changs struggled with their desire to hire experienced executives and their distrust of outsiders, five of the employees said. Sapna Maheshwari, New York Times, "One Family Built Forever 21, and Fueled Its Collapse," 24 Oct. 2019 Most of what made the show so popular in 1969 — its frustration with bureaucracy, its distrust of authority — still rings true in 2019. Devan Coggan, EW.com, "Monty Python's Flying Circus," 4 Oct. 2019 But the distrust that is setting in, as well as the lack of leadership, portends a long-term weakening. Washington Post, "Maybe Carlos Ghosn Wasn’t So Bad After All," 18 Sep. 2019 That, of course, is not happening, but the distrust of immigrants or foreigners is certainly echoed in this exhibit, as in current events. Daily Pilot, "New exhibit in Anaheim tells stories of O.C.-based Japanese Americans incarcerated during World War II," 5 Sep. 2019 And Portland residents’ distrust of police officers is already high, particularly among minorities, a consultant’s study found earlier this year in surveys done for the bureau’s five-year strategic plan. oregonlive, "Portland cop’s past membership in extremist Facebook groups raises questions about how to track offensive social media use," 29 Aug. 2019 In an atmosphere of widening economic inequality and deepening distrust of business, the powerful group has redefined its mission. Fortune, "America’s CEOs Seek a New Purpose for the Corporation," 19 Aug. 2019 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb In addition to a police department that's distrusted by many residents, Charm City has seen a mix of chronically high rates of violent crime. Fox News, "Baltimore’s violent weekend sees 7 shot -- 2 fatally -- in 16 hours as homicide count reaches 240," 9 Sep. 2019 Jeremy Corbyn, the natural choice as leader of the Labour Party, is too left-wing, and as a lifelong critic of the European Union, is distrusted by determined opponents of Brexit. Stephen Castle, New York Times, "What’s Next for Brexit? Six Possible Outcomes," 30 Aug. 2019 Last month Russia struck a deal with Huawei, a Chinese telecoms firm distrusted by America, to develop 5G equipment—thus rooting Russia firmly in China’s half of the splinternet. The Economist, "Partnership is much better for China than it is for Russia," 27 July 2019 If confirmed, Scalia will replace Alexander Acosta, who was distrusted by anti-labor conservatives during his 2½ years in the job. Maggie Haberman, BostonGlobe.com, "Trump plans to nominate Antonin Scalia’s son for labor secretary post," 18 July 2019 Baldwin, who moved to Paris in 1948, two years after Wright, embraced the gift at first but came to distrust it. Adam Shatz, The New Yorker, "“How Does It Feel To Be a White Man?”: William Gardner Smith’s Exile in Paris," 11 Aug. 2019 Huawei, a company deeply distrusted by America, is rolling out its 5G telecoms equipment in Russia. The Economist, "But their new partnership makes China a lot more equal than Russia," 25 July 2019 Turkey also distrusts Washington because Muslim cleric Fethullah Gulen, whom Ankara says orchestrated a 2016 failed coup, remains free in the U.S. Gulen denies involvement in the coup attempt. WHY DOES THE US OBJECT TO TURKEY’S S-400 PURCHASE? Washington Post, "AP Explains: Why NATO member Turkey wants Russian missiles," 18 July 2019 His dad and grandmother distrust the police because their home in California was mistakenly raided by a SWAT team that was supposed to search a crack house next door, Jarren said. Rebecca Lurye, courant.com, "Building a safer city: Hartford youth from “the 06120” offer stories, solutions to urban gun violence," 21 Aug. 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'distrust.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of distrust

Noun

1513, in the meaning defined above

Verb

1548, in the meaning defined above

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Statistics for distrust

Last Updated

18 Nov 2019

Time Traveler for distrust

The first known use of distrust was in 1513

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More Definitions for distrust

distrust

noun
How to pronounce distrust (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of distrust

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: lack of trust or confidence : a feeling that someone or something is not honest and cannot be trusted

distrust

verb

English Language Learners Definition of distrust (Entry 2 of 2)

: to have no trust or confidence in (someone or something)

distrust

noun
dis·​trust | \ dis-ˈtrəst How to pronounce distrust (audio) \

Kids Definition of distrust

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a lack of belief or confidence in : suspicion The enemies eyed each other with distrust.

Other Words from distrust

distrustful adjective

distrust

verb
distrusted; distrusting

Kids Definition of distrust (Entry 2 of 2)

: to have no belief or confidence in I distrust the ad's claims.

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Comments on distrust

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