defraud

verb
de·​fraud | \ di-ˈfrȯd How to pronounce defraud (audio) , dē- \
defrauded; defrauding; defrauds

Definition of defraud

transitive verb

: to deprive of something by deception or fraud trying to defraud the public Investors in the scheme were defrauded of their life savings.

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Other Words from defraud

defrauder \ di-​ˈfrȯ-​dər How to pronounce defrauder (audio) , dē-​ \ noun

Choose the Right Synonym for defraud

cheat, cozen, defraud, swindle mean to get something by dishonesty or deception. cheat suggests using trickery that escapes observation. cheated me out of a dollar cozen implies artful persuading or flattering to attain a thing or a purpose. always able to cozen her grandfather out of a few dollars defraud stresses depriving one of his or her rights and usually connotes deliberate perversion of the truth. defrauded of her inheritance by an unscrupulous lawyer swindle implies large-scale cheating by misrepresentation or abuse of confidence. swindled of their savings by con artists

Examples of defraud in a Sentence

They were accused of trying to defraud the public. They conspired to defraud the government. She was convicted of writing bad checks with intent to defraud.
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Recent Examples on the Web Avenatti faces separate charges in New York for allegedly defrauding Daniels and other clients. Author: Shayna Jacobs, Anchorage Daily News, "Trump-bashing attorney Michael Avenatti found guilty in Nike extortion case," 14 Feb. 2020 Former Indianapolis real estate broker Bert Whalen, who was Morris’ business partner from about 2014 to 2018, was indicted in November in federal court for allegedly defrauding investors directed to him by Morris. Tony Cook, Indianapolis Star, "Ex-Fox & Friends host Clayton Morris seeks $7 million from critic of Indy real estate deals," 6 Jan. 2020 Avenatti faces separate charges in the same courthouse for allegedly defrauding his most famous client, Stormy Daniels, out of a nearly $300,000 book advance. Tribune News Service, oregonlive, "Celeb attorney Mark Geragos at the ‘heart’ of Nike extortion case, Michael Avenatti says," 25 Dec. 2019 For example, the Chamber highlighted several class-action lawsuits seeking millions of dollars against Starbucks for allegedly defrauding customers by putting too much milk or ice (and not enough coffee) in their coffee beverages. Kenneth K. Lee, National Review, "A Counterintuitive and Compelling Case for Class-Action Lawsuits," 2 Dec. 2019 Hanson, 22, who became involved in the business shortly out of high school, pleaded guilty in July to wire fraud and money laundering for defrauding about 60 sellers in North Dakota, Minnesota and Canada. Dave Kolpack, Twin Cities, "Former N.D. grain trader, 22, gets 8 years in prison for $11M scam," 12 Nov. 2019 That sentence is being served concurrently with a 15-year federal sentence for defrauding about two dozen investors out of nearly $2 million. Cary Spivak, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, "Imprisoned 'Bring it on' felon Todd Dyer sues his father and other family members," 11 Nov. 2019 The president of the jewelry company, Unique Gems International Corp., was later sentenced to 14 years in prison for defrauding 16,000 people in a $90 million scam. CBS News, "Walter Mercado, famed Puerto Rican astrologer, has died at 87," 3 Nov. 2019 The president of the jewelry company, Unique Gems International Corp., was later sentenced to 14 years in prison for defrauding 16,000 people in a $90 million scam. chicagotribune.com, "Walter Mercado, a flamboyant astrologer and TV star popular across Latin America, dies at 88," 3 Nov. 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'defraud.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of defraud

14th century, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for defraud

Middle English, from Anglo-French defrauder, from Latin defraudare, from de- + fraudare to cheat, from fraud-, fraus fraud

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Time Traveler for defraud

Time Traveler

The first known use of defraud was in the 14th century

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Statistics for defraud

Last Updated

17 Feb 2020

Cite this Entry

“Defraud.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/defrauded. Accessed 18 Feb. 2020.

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More Definitions for defraud

defraud

verb
How to pronounce defraud (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of defraud

: to trick or cheat someone or something in order to get money : to use fraud in order to get money from a person, an organization, etc.

defraud

verb
de·​fraud | \ di-ˈfrȯd How to pronounce defraud (audio) \
defrauded; defrauding

Kids Definition of defraud

: to trick or cheat someone in order to get money They were accused of defrauding customers.
de·​fraud | \ di-ˈfrȯd How to pronounce defraud (audio) \

Legal Definition of defraud

: to deprive of something by fraud

Other Words from defraud

defrauder noun

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More from Merriam-Webster on defraud

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for defraud

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with defraud

Spanish Central: Translation of defraud

Nglish: Translation of defraud for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of defraud for Arabic Speakers

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