craze

verb
\ ˈkrāz How to pronounce craze (audio) \
crazed; crazing

Definition of craze

 (Entry 1 of 2)

transitive verb

1 obsolete : break, shatter
2 : to produce minute cracks on the surface or glaze of crazed glass crazed pottery
3 : to make insane or as if insane crazed by pain and fear crazed addicts

intransitive verb

1 archaic : shatter, break
2 : to become insane
3 : to develop a mesh of fine cracks

craze

noun

Definition of craze (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : an exaggerated and often transient enthusiasm : mania the latest craze in music
2 : a crack in a surface or coating (as of glaze or enamel)

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Choose the Right Synonym for craze

Noun

fashion, style, mode, vogue, fad, rage, craze mean the usage accepted by those who want to be up-to-date. fashion is the most general term and applies to any way of dressing, behaving, writing, or performing that is favored at any one time or place. the current fashion style often implies a distinctive fashion adopted by people of taste. a media baron used to traveling in style mode suggests the fashion of the moment among those anxious to appear elegant and sophisticated. slim bodies are the mode at this resort vogue stresses the wide acceptance of a fashion. short skirts are back in vogue fad suggests caprice in taking up or in dropping a fashion. last year's fad is over rage and craze stress intense enthusiasm in adopting a fad. Cajun food was the rage nearly everywhere for a time crossword puzzles once seemed just a passing craze but have lasted

Examples of craze in a Sentence

Verb

soldiers who had been crazed by months of combat and chaos in the countryside

Noun

if history is any guide, this latest diet for losing weight is just another craze

Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

Investigators had been taught that crazing was indicative of fast-moving hot fires, likely caused by a flammable accelerant. Maude Campbell, Popular Mechanics, "The 1991 Firestorm That Changed Everything We Thought We Knew About Arson," 8 Nov. 2018 That had never been done before and, after Oakland, never could be done, at least for crazing. Maude Campbell, Popular Mechanics, "The 1991 Firestorm That Changed Everything We Thought We Knew About Arson," 8 Nov. 2018 The chemicals in these products will cause the finish to cloud and craze over time. Scot Meacham Wood, House Beautiful, "Ask a Designer: How To Decorate With the Acrylic Trend," 12 Mar. 2015 Robert Mann, an airline consultant and former American Airlines executive, said windows are periodically polished to remove crazing, the formation of tiny cracks in the acrylic windows from exposure to chemicals and the sun’s rays. Mark Gillispie And David Koenig, BostonGlobe.com, "Southwest plane with cracked window diverted to Cleveland," 2 May 2018 Becker then built a stout wire fence around his reservation and lived in peace until last week when a killer whale, or orca, arrived and so harried the sea lions that, crazed with fright, the lions smashed down his fence and swarmed his lighthouse. Johnny Miller, San Francisco Chronicle, "Reporter Randy Shilts announces he has AIDS, 1993," 7 Feb. 2018 While the other characters explore romance and sexuality, Jamal explores desperation, getting increasingly crazed by the episode. Rebecca Farley, refinery29.com, "Rolling Deep With The On My Block RollerWorld Conspiracy," 28 Mar. 2018 Lesser clay bricks that might be used for construction of walls often craze and crumble after several winters in contact with soil. Courtney Ortega, star-telegram, "Great garden-path options to ponder," 1 Nov. 2017 In a nation as soccer-crazed yet World Cup-deprived as Peru has been, this is an absolutely massive deal. Daniel Rapaport, SI.com, "Peru's President Told Public Workers to Leave Work at 4 PM to Watch Crucial World Cup Qualifier," 10 Oct. 2017

Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

And today in totally wacky toy news… Squeezamals (not to be confused with their talkative friends, Hatchimals) apparently are the latest craze to sweep kids' wish lists. Megan Stein, Country Living, "If Your Kids Love Hatchimals They're Going to Freak Over This New Squeezamals Game," 9 Jan. 2019 The idea has since become a mini-craze, with the results posted all over social media, often with hilarious effects. Martin Rogers, USA TODAY, "Playoff beard? Russians grow mustaches to support team in World Cup," 14 June 2018 This isn't the first time Balenciaga's outerwear have caused a viral craze. Erica Gonzales, Harper's BAZAAR, "Balenciaga Is Selling a Seven-Layer Jacket for $9,000," 30 Aug. 2018 The title refers to the amount of time some wrestlers spent away from home each year during the peak years of the 1980s, when Hulk Hogan and the World Wrestling Federation sparked a national craze. Jay Reddick, OrlandoSentinel.com, "Wrestlers' hard life on the road chronicled in new documentary," 11 July 2018 The innovation forever changed the Tex-Mex restaurant business (placing bars front and center) and triggered the craze for Tex-Mex food. Franz Lidz, Smithsonian, "The Uniquely Texan Origins of the Frozen Margarita," 27 June 2018 Alford, who specializes in participatory journalism, was asked to take Zumba classes and write about the then-burgeoning craze for the New York Times in 2011. Barbara Spindel, The Christian Science Monitor, "'And Then We Danced,' 'Old in Art School,' tell of later-in-life creative endeavors," 21 June 2018 With a more era-appropriate score, the visual elements might feel less cloyingly twee (after all, the 18th-century craze for all things picturesque long predates the age of influencers). Sophie Gilbert, The Atlantic, "Little Women for the Instagram Generation," 14 May 2018 Writers on the interiors blog apartmenttherapy.com debated about which plant would launch the next craze, alternately championing the monstera or the rubber plant as the new fiddle leaf. Cindy Dampier, chicagotribune.com, "#PlantShelfie: Houseplants are having a social media moment," 1 May 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'craze.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of craze

Verb

14th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1

Noun

1812, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for craze

Verb and Noun

Middle English crasen to crush, craze, of Scandinavian origin; akin to Old Swedish krasa to crush

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Statistics for craze

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Time Traveler for craze

The first known use of craze was in the 14th century

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More Definitions for craze

craze

noun

English Language Learners Definition of craze

: something that is very popular for a period of time

craze

noun
\ ˈkrāz How to pronounce craze (audio) \

Kids Definition of craze

: something that is very popular for a short while

craze

verb
\ ˈkrāz How to pronounce craze (audio) \
crazed; crazing

Medical Definition of craze

transitive verb

: to make insane or as if insane crazed by pain and fear

intransitive verb

: to become insane

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More from Merriam-Webster on craze

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with craze

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for craze

Spanish Central: Translation of craze

Nglish: Translation of craze for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of craze for Arabic Speakers

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about craze

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