craze

verb
\ ˈkrāz How to pronounce craze (audio) \
crazed; crazing

Definition of craze

 (Entry 1 of 2)

transitive verb

1 obsolete : break, shatter
2 : to produce minute cracks on the surface or glaze of crazed glass crazed pottery
3 : to make insane or as if insane crazed by pain and fear crazed addicts

intransitive verb

1 archaic : shatter, break
2 : to become insane
3 : to develop a mesh of fine cracks

craze

noun

Definition of craze (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : an exaggerated and often transient enthusiasm : mania the latest craze in music
2 : a crack in a surface or coating (as of glaze or enamel)

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Choose the Right Synonym for craze

Noun

fashion, style, mode, vogue, fad, rage, craze mean the usage accepted by those who want to be up-to-date. fashion is the most general term and applies to any way of dressing, behaving, writing, or performing that is favored at any one time or place. the current fashion style often implies a distinctive fashion adopted by people of taste. a media baron used to traveling in style mode suggests the fashion of the moment among those anxious to appear elegant and sophisticated. slim bodies are the mode at this resort vogue stresses the wide acceptance of a fashion. short skirts are back in vogue fad suggests caprice in taking up or in dropping a fashion. last year's fad is over rage and craze stress intense enthusiasm in adopting a fad. Cajun food was the rage nearly everywhere for a time crossword puzzles once seemed just a passing craze but have lasted

Examples of craze in a Sentence

Verb

soldiers who had been crazed by months of combat and chaos in the countryside

Noun

if history is any guide, this latest diet for losing weight is just another craze

Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

Robert Mann, an airline consultant and former American Airlines executive, said windows are periodically polished to remove crazing, the formation of cracks in the acrylic windows from exposure to chemicals and the sun's rays. Kathleen Joyce, Fox News, "Southwest Airlines flight diverts to Cleveland due to broken window," 2 May 2018 Investigators had been taught that crazing was indicative of fast-moving hot fires, likely caused by a flammable accelerant. Maude Campbell, Popular Mechanics, "The 1991 Firestorm That Changed Everything We Thought We Knew About Arson," 8 Nov. 2018 That had never been done before and, after Oakland, never could be done, at least for crazing. Maude Campbell, Popular Mechanics, "The 1991 Firestorm That Changed Everything We Thought We Knew About Arson," 8 Nov. 2018 The chemicals in these products will cause the finish to cloud and craze over time. Scot Meacham Wood, House Beautiful, "Ask a Designer: How To Decorate With the Acrylic Trend," 12 Mar. 2015 Robert Mann, an airline consultant and former American Airlines executive, said windows are periodically polished to remove crazing, the formation of tiny cracks in the acrylic windows from exposure to chemicals and the sun’s rays. Mark Gillispie And David Koenig, BostonGlobe.com, "Southwest plane with cracked window diverted to Cleveland," 2 May 2018 Becker then built a stout wire fence around his reservation and lived in peace until last week when a killer whale, or orca, arrived and so harried the sea lions that, crazed with fright, the lions smashed down his fence and swarmed his lighthouse. Johnny Miller, San Francisco Chronicle, "Reporter Randy Shilts announces he has AIDS, 1993," 7 Feb. 2018 While the other characters explore romance and sexuality, Jamal explores desperation, getting increasingly crazed by the episode. Rebecca Farley, refinery29.com, "Rolling Deep With The On My Block RollerWorld Conspiracy," 28 Mar. 2018 Lesser clay bricks that might be used for construction of walls often craze and crumble after several winters in contact with soil. Courtney Ortega, star-telegram, "Great garden-path options to ponder," 1 Nov. 2017

Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

Get our daily newsletter After a global craze in the 1980s, the puzzle’s popularity gradually faded; it was propelled back from oblivion by the internet. The Economist, "Speedcubers are solving Rubik’s Cubes at ever-faster speeds," 11 July 2019 But in the years that followed, Gilberto’s bossa nova cooled from a craze into a mystery. Chris Richards, Washington Post, "João Gilberto sang lullabies to the future," 7 July 2019 The music gained particular popularity in the United States, spawning pop hits and even a dance craze. Ben Ratliff, New York Times, "João Gilberto, an Architect of Bossa Nova, Is Dead at 88," 6 July 2019 While plenty of celebrities have the kind of influence and following to set a breakout haircut trend, Rihanna remains one of those rare celebs that has enough star power to launch a nail-art craze with a single Instagram post. Rachel Lubitz, refinery29.com, "Rihanna Just Remixed Her Jade Manicure — & It Looks So Good," 10 June 2019 In the Hudson and other American waters, the fishery for Atlantic sturgeon has seen spasmodic waves of depredation, particularly during a caviar craze in the late nineteenth century and then several more times in the 20th century. Andrew Revkin, National Geographic, "14-foot fish spotted in river, giving hope to vanished giant’s return," 7 Mar. 2019 Pistor’s initial moon flight booking spawned a craze that would ultimately see Pan Am field 100,000 moon reservation requests under its First Moon Flights Club, which finally closed in 1971. Sam Blum, Popular Mechanics, "When Pan Am Promised To Fly Us To the Moon," 28 Feb. 2019 Fewer than 2,000 Food Fight cabinets were produced, making it a relative rarity in the arcade craze dominated by Pac-Man (400,000 machines), Space Invaders (360,000) and Donkey Kong (132,000). Indianapolis Star, "At two-story 16-Bit Bar + Arcade, players will 'level up' in more than one way," 27 June 2019 With a botanical base, gin has an herbaceous vibe that fits neatly into the plant craze. John Kell, Fortune, "Gin Sales Are Booming and It Could Be Thanks to the Growing Plant Craze," 22 June 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'craze.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of craze

Verb

14th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1

Noun

1812, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for craze

Verb and Noun

Middle English crasen to crush, craze, of Scandinavian origin; akin to Old Swedish krasa to crush

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Statistics for craze

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Time Traveler for craze

The first known use of craze was in the 14th century

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More Definitions for craze

craze

noun

English Language Learners Definition of craze

: something that is very popular for a period of time

craze

noun
\ ˈkrāz How to pronounce craze (audio) \

Kids Definition of craze

: something that is very popular for a short while

craze

verb
\ ˈkrāz How to pronounce craze (audio) \
crazed; crazing

Medical Definition of craze

transitive verb

: to make insane or as if insane crazed by pain and fear

intransitive verb

: to become insane

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More from Merriam-Webster on craze

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with craze

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for craze

Spanish Central: Translation of craze

Nglish: Translation of craze for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of craze for Arabic Speakers

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about craze

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