covet

verb
cov·​et | \ ˈkə-vət \
coveted; coveting; covets

Definition of covet

transitive verb

1 : to wish for earnestly covet an award
2 : to desire (what belongs to another) inordinately or culpably The king's brother coveted the throne.

intransitive verb

: to feel inordinate desire for what belongs to another

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Other Words from covet

covetable \ ˈkə-​və-​tə-​bəl \ adjective
coveter \ ˈkə-​və-​tər \ noun
covetingly \ ˈkə-​və-​tiŋ-​lē \ adverb

Choose the Right Synonym for covet

desire, wish, want, crave, covet mean to have a longing for. desire stresses the strength of feeling and often implies strong intention or aim. desires to start a new life wish sometimes implies a general or transient longing especially for the unattainable. wishes for permanent world peace want specifically suggests a felt need or lack. wants to have a family crave stresses the force of physical appetite or emotional need. craves sweets covet implies strong envious desire. covets his rise to fame

Examples of covet in a Sentence

The oldest of the students, she had become a confidante of Fern's and she alone was allowed to call her by her first name. It was not a privilege the others coveted. — Edward P. Jones, The Known World, 2003 The only Commandment I'd breached, besides killing that bird with my air rifle, was that I had coveted Bobby Entrekin's electric train. It blew real smoke. Mine didn't. — Lewis Grizzard, Reader's Digest, January 1992 He had discovered a great law of human action, without knowing it—namely, that in order to make a man or a boy covet a thing, it is only necessary to make the thing difficult to attain. — Mark Twain, Tom Sawyer, 1876 His religion warns against coveting material goods. I've been coveting that sleek sports car in the showroom for some time now.
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Recent Examples on the Web

But his wicked uncle, Scar, covets the kingdom for himself. Jennifer Ouellette, Ars Technica, "Surprise! Disney drops first trailer for “live-action” film The Lion King," 23 Nov. 2018 Trump has coveted seats held by several red-state Democrats, including Joe Donnelly of Indiana, Joe Manchin of West Virginia, Claire McCaskill of Missouri, Jon Tester of Montana and Heidi Heitkamp of North Dakota. Ken Thomas, The Seattle Times, "WHAT TO WATCH: After turbulent campaign, it’s up to voters," 7 Nov. 2018 Pelosi’s top lieutenant, Democratic Whip Steny Hoyer of Maryland, has long coveted the top job, waiting out Pelosi for his moment to hold the gavel. Fox News, "Defiant Pelosi says she's staying: 'I can take the heat'," 24 Aug. 2018 Quite possibly the most storied, most coveted, most majestic of all tricks—held for three glorious seconds. The Editors, Outside Online, "The Moments That Changed Us," 11 July 2018 The shoe features a suede upper, leather lining, and a crepe sole—and, of course, that coveted Supreme box logo at the heel. Tyler Watamanuk, GQ, "Clarks Gives Two Classic Shoes a Super-High-End Upgrade," 23 May 2018 But the chances of an embattled front office like Minnesota’s coveting a draft pick seven years from now were roughly the same as Thibodeau coming to work dressed like Prince. Ben Cohen, WSJ, "How the Trade for Jimmy Butler Changes the NBA Season," 10 Nov. 2018 The backfield and offensive line are improving, and the defense has what every team covets: perimeter cover corners (Casey Hayward and, if healthy, Jason Verrett) and dominant edge rushers (Joey Bosa and Melvin Ingram). Andy Benoit, SI.com, "Chargers Are Ready to Claim Their Piece of the Los Angeles Sports Market," 20 June 2018 Lamar’s accomplished the tricky feat of transcending his native genre without ever shunning it, a level-up his hip-hop Salieri, Drake, likely covets. Drew Lazor, Philly.com, "Kendrick Lamar looms large at his show at BB&T Pavilion," 9 June 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'covet.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of covet

14th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1

History and Etymology for covet

Middle English coveiten, from Anglo-French coveiter, from Vulgar Latin *cupidietare, from Latin cupiditat-, cupiditas desire, from cupidus desirous, from cupere to desire

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Statistics for covet

Last Updated

14 Jan 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for covet

The first known use of covet was in the 14th century

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More Definitions for covet

covet

verb

English Language Learners Definition of covet

: to want (something that you do not have) very much

covet

verb
cov·​et | \ ˈkəv-ət \
coveted; coveting

Kids Definition of covet

: to wish for greatly or with envy I admit I covet success. It's wrong to covet a friend's happiness.

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More from Merriam-Webster on covet

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with covet

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for covet

Spanish Central: Translation of covet

Nglish: Translation of covet for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of covet for Arabic Speakers

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