corollary

noun
cor·ol·lary | \ ˈkȯr-ə-ˌler-ē , ˈkär- , -le-rē , British kə-ˈrä-lə-rē \
plural corollaries

Definition of corollary 

1 : a proposition (see proposition entry 1 sense 1c) inferred immediately from a proved proposition with little or no additional proof

2a : something that naturally follows : result … love was a stormy passion and jealousy its normal corollary. —Ida Treat

b : something that incidentally or naturally accompanies or parallels A corollary to the problem of the number of vessels to be built was that of the types of vessels to be constructed. —Daniel Marx

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Other words from corollary

corollary adjective

The Origin and Evolution of corollary

Corollary comes from the Late Latin noun corollarium, which can be translated as "a garland given as a reward." "Corollarium" comes from the Latin corolla, meaning "small crown or garland." If you know that a garland or small crown was sometimes given to actors in addition to their pay, it makes sense that another sense of "corollarium" is "gratuity." Later, "corollarium" developed the philosophical sense of a supplementary proposition that follows directly from one that has been proved. (You can think of a corollary as a "bonus" that follows from the proof of something else.) The broader modern sense, "something that naturally follows," evolved from the philosophical one.

Examples of corollary in a Sentence

one corollary of the rise of television was a massive makeover of radio's programming increased taxes—or expanding deficits—are the inevitable corollary to any new government spending program

Recent Examples on the Web

That is because the corollary of dollar dominance is dollar dependence. The Economist, "America must use sanctions cautiously," 19 May 2018 Is this dopamine reward reaction the mouse corollary of human in-group recognition? Leslie Henderson, Scientific American, "Why Our Brains See the World as "Us" versus "Them"," 22 June 2018 The corollary to this truism of the job market is that job-hunting is all about connections. Ellevate, chicagotribune.com, "How cold calling could actually work when you're networking," 12 July 2018 The corollary to that is there is another way to do politics. Danielle Tcholakian, Longreads, "An Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez Reading List," 10 July 2018 But there is also a corollary at play to the traditional Orwellianism: a kind of emotional doublespeak. Megan Garber, The Atlantic, "How to Look Away," 20 June 2018 Is there a corollary for men, a genre of self-help books aimed at helping men cope with the stigma of their living-alone status? Ashley Fetters, Curbed, "Living alone and liking it," 20 June 2018 Foreigners are also unlikely to have suffered much direct harm from the fall in bond prices (the corollary of rising yields). The Economist, "Italy’s political crisis is roiling financial markets once more," 31 May 2018 There might be a corollary to the 2014 Spurs — a veteran team haunted by the previous year’s disappointment — but Utah didn’t have an emerging Kawhi Leonard. Mike Finger, San Antonio Express-News, "Finals to add new layer to Jordan-James debate," 30 May 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'corollary.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of corollary

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for corollary

Middle English correlary, corolarie, borrowed from Late Latin corōllārium, going back to Latin, "garland (given as a reward), unsolicited payment, gratuity," from corōlla "small wreath of flowers" + -ārium -ary entry 1 — more at corolla

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Statistics for corollary

Last Updated

25 Aug 2018

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for corollary

The first known use of corollary was in the 14th century

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More Definitions for corollary

corollary

noun

English Language Learners Definition of corollary

: something that naturally follows or results from another thing

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