conduit

noun

con·​duit ˈkän-ˌdü-ət How to pronounce conduit (audio)
-ˌdyü-,
 also  -dwət,
-dət
1
: a natural or artificial channel through which something (such as a fluid) is conveyed
a conduit for rainwater
2
: a pipe, tube, or tile for protecting electric wires or cables
3
: a means of transmitting or distributing
a conduit for illicit payments
a conduit of information
4
archaic : fountain

Example Sentences

the major conduit for carrying water to the military base water flowed along the conduit to the fountain
Recent Examples on the Web Tracy is the conduit for employers and aspiring employees. Darcel Rockett, Chicago Tribune, 21 Oct. 2022 Our mission is to be the conduit to representation through storytelling, community engagement and advocacy. Lisa Deaderick, San Diego Union-Tribune, 17 Sep. 2022 Woodstock confirmed that music itself, along with all the protests in the streets, was the conduit through which we, the counterculture, were being taught to listen to in the first place. Michael Klein, SPIN, 15 Aug. 2022 Meaningful and effective content is the driving force of social media, while the marketing funnel is the conduit that translates brand awareness and engagement to sales and shares. Alana Sandel, Forbes, 30 June 2022 The story and its characters are duty-bound to subjects, traditions, and the conventions of the Marvel Cinematic Universe, where each piece of intellectual property is a conduit to a broader narrative. Janelle Okwodu, Vogue, 11 Nov. 2022 Unlike a crypto lender, which invests a consumer’s deposits in the manner of a bank, an exchange is supposed to function merely as a conduit, allowing consumers to make transactions and exchanges to take a commission. Steven Zeitchik, Washington Post, 11 Nov. 2022 But after Harrigan’s death, the phone seemingly becomes a conduit to the beyond. Keith Phipps, Rolling Stone, 8 Oct. 2022 The benefits of using the platform are simply too great to pass up even with concerns about TikTok as a conduit for misinformation or exploiting privacy. David Klepper, Fortune, 1 Oct. 2022 See More

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'conduit.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

Word History

Etymology

Middle English conduyt, condyt, cundyte "channel or pipe for conveying water, act of escorting for protection" borrowed from Anglo-French conduit, condet "channel for water, guide, escort party," (also continental Old French), noun derivative from conduit, past participle of conduire "to guide, escort," going back to Latin condūcere "to bring together, join, hire, accept a contract for" (Medieval Latin also "to lead, escort, provide a channel for [water]") — more at conduce

Note: The senses of the vernacular word conduit parallel those of Medieval Latin conductus, conductum—see conduct entry 2. The verb conduct entry 1 and the nouns conduct entry 2 and conductor all had vernacular counterparts in Middle English and early Modern English—conduiten, conduit and conduytour—taken from Anglo-French. Of these only conduit has survived in Modern English, and with the restricted sense "channel for water."

First Known Use

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Time Traveler
The first known use of conduit was in the 14th century

Dictionary Entries Near conduit

Cite this Entry

“Conduit.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/conduit. Accessed 9 Dec. 2022.

Kids Definition

conduit

noun
con·​duit ˈkän-ˌd(y)ü-ət How to pronounce conduit (audio)
 also  -d(w)ət
1
: a channel through which water or other fluid is carried
2
: a pipe, tube, or tile for protecting electric wires or cables

More from Merriam-Webster on conduit

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