commune

verb
com·​mune | \ kə-ˈmyün How to pronounce commune (audio) \
communed; communing

Definition of commune

 (Entry 1 of 2)

transitive verb

obsolete : talk over, discuss have more to commune— William Shakespeare

intransitive verb

1 : to receive Communion The people who had communed returned to their pews using the side aisles.
2 : to communicate intimately commune with nature … he stands communing with his soul on a bridge …— Richard Alleva

commune

noun
com·​mune | \ ˈkäm-ˌyün How to pronounce commune (audio) ; kə-ˈmyün, kä-\

Definition of commune (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : the smallest administrative district of many countries especially in Europe
3 : community: such as
a : a medieval usually municipal corporation
b(1) : mir
(2) : an often rural community organized on a communal basis

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Synonyms for commune

Synonyms: Verb

bond, click, relate

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Examples of commune in a Sentence

Verb

a psychic who communes with the dead after a week in the wilderness, the scouts were really starting to commune with nature

Noun

He's living in a religious commune.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

Walking the streets and breathing in the air from the Alabama Riverfront is like communing with them. Nneka M. Okona, Condé Nast Traveler, "As Montgomery Becomes a Destination, How Should Travelers Deal With Its History?," 21 June 2019 But particularly when these cells commune in great numbers, their startling collective talents for solving problems and controlling their environment emerge. Quanta Magazine, "Seeing the Beautiful Intelligence of Microbes," 13 Nov. 2017 Blogs and online forums, then Twitter and Facebook, allowed people to commune away from censorship. Khalid Albaih, Quartz, "We used our art to fight. Now we need it to heal us," 19 June 2019 Its music found politics in pleasure—in dancing, listening, communing together. Hua Hsu, The New Yorker, "How George Clinton Made Funk a World View," 9 July 2017 Under sumptuous tents and accompanied by the luxuries of home, glampers commune with nature in lavish style. Mike Kerrigan, WSJ, "Bear With Me? Get It Away!," 26 July 2018 Photo: Reid Morth If there were a place to commune with nature—and not a single human—in the Lower 48, this would be it. Nina Sovich, WSJ, "The New Outdoor Getaway: Landscapes That Have Been ‘Rewilded’," 20 Sep. 2018 Nick Devane runs a company called Pilotworks, which rents out shared commercial kitchens in multiple U.S. cities where aspirational bakers and food-delivery startups can commune. Katy Steinmetz, Time, "Women-Only Spaces Are Part of a Coworking Craze. Some Might Also Be Violating the Law," 20 Apr. 2018 Since that time, fictive sisterhoods of all stripes (familial and otherwise) have been realized to wonderful effect, giving women the opportunity to commune and take up space in ways not always fostered by their surrounding culture. Marley Marius, Vogue, "8 Stirring Tales of Sisterhood Adapted From the Page to the Silver Screen (That Aren’t Greta Gerwig’s Little Women)," 13 July 2018

Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

In the early 1800s, George Rapp and his 800 devoted followers built a commune called Harmonie on the Wabash River, and later sold the property to Robert Owen. Kellie Hwang, Indianapolis Star, "You can get to these 10 unique road trip destinations from Indy in 5 hours or less," 3 July 2019 Four grad-school dudes decide to travel to a remote part of Sweden and visit the commune where one of them grew up. Brooke Bobb, Vogue, "Why Midsommar Will Make You Want to Dress Like You’re In a Swedish Cult This Summer," 3 July 2019 Long before making flatware, Oneida was a religious commune founded on polyamory. Curbed Staff, Curbed, "The ‘free love’ utopia behind your forks and knives," 20 June 2019 Co-living might hark back to the 1960s and ’70s when hippie communes flourished in rural settings, or even the boarding houses that 19th-century immigrants could afford. Sara Miller Llana, The Christian Science Monitor, "Want to live in the city? Try buying a house with five friends.," 12 June 2019 Get out of the house and commune with nature and animals. Graham Techler, The New Yorker, "Self-Care Through the Ages," 5 June 2019 But most of all, I was gripped by the descriptions of Autun, a sleepy hilltop commune about 185 miles southeast of Paris, where the 34-year-old narrator goes at the book’s outset to stay in the vacant family home of friends. New York Times, "James Salter’s ‘Blue, Indolent’ Corner of Burgundy," 5 June 2018 In 1825 Owen founded New Harmony, an Indiana commune, to demonstrate the superiority of what was first... Joshua Muravchik, WSJ, "Socialism Fails Every Time," 9 Apr. 2019 The Aggressive Christianity Missions Training Corps was founded in the early 1980s as a commune called the Free Love Ministries. Chris Harris, PEOPLE.com, "Police Go Looking for Missing Boy in Cult's Compound and Allegedly Uncover Sex Abuse, Slave Labor," 28 June 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'commune.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of commune

Verb

15th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense

Noun

1673, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for commune

Verb

Middle English, to share, receive Communion, from Anglo-French communer, cummunier, from Late Latin communicare, from Latin — see communicate

Noun

French, alteration of Middle French comugne, from Medieval Latin communia, from Latin, neuter plural of communis

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Statistics for commune

Last Updated

10 Jul 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for commune

The first known use of commune was in the 15th century

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More Definitions for commune

commune

verb

English Language Learners Definition of commune

 (Entry 1 of 2)

formal : to communicate with someone or something in a very personal or spiritual way

commune

noun

English Language Learners Definition of commune (Entry 2 of 2)

: a group of people who live together and share responsibilities, possessions, etc.
: the smallest division of local government in some countries especially in Europe

commune

verb
com·​mune | \ kə-ˈmyün How to pronounce commune (audio) \
communed; communing

Kids Definition of commune

: to be in close accord or communication with someone or something He enjoys walking in the woods and communing with nature.

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Comments on commune

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