commune

verb
com·​mune | \ kə-ˈmyün How to pronounce commune (audio) \
communed; communing

Definition of commune

 (Entry 1 of 2)

transitive verb

obsolete : talk over, discuss have more to commune— William Shakespeare

intransitive verb

1 : to receive Communion The people who had communed returned to their pews using the side aisles.
2 : to communicate intimately commune with nature … he stands communing with his soul on a bridge …— Richard Alleva

commune

noun
com·​mune | \ ˈkäm-ˌyün How to pronounce commune (audio) ; kə-ˈmyün, kä- \

Definition of commune (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : the smallest administrative district of many countries especially in Europe
3 : community: such as
a : a medieval usually municipal corporation
b(1) : mir
(2) : an often rural community organized on a communal basis

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Synonyms for commune

Synonyms: Verb

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Examples of commune in a Sentence

Verb a psychic who communes with the dead after a week in the wilderness, the scouts were really starting to commune with nature Noun He's living in a religious commune.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Verb For me, visiting Edinburg since then has not only been a chance to visit my wife’s family, but also to commune with the memory of my parents. Gilbert Garcia, ExpressNews.com, "Garcia: For many of us, this Thanksgiving will be a hard one," 21 Nov. 2020 To watch Obama put aside the seriousness of that moment and then commune with James and the Cavaliers was to watch a president bathe in a sort of healing balm. Kurt Streeter, New York Times, "Even With a New President, Sports at the White House Won’t Be the Same," 9 Nov. 2020 Talking about zozobra provides something to commune over, something on which to base a love for one another, or at least sympathy. Carlos Alberto Sánchez, The Conversation, "Feeling disoriented by the election, pandemic and everything else? It’s called ‘zozobra,’ and Mexican philosophers have some advice," 2 Nov. 2020 For decades, technologists have been trying to get brains to interface with computer keyboards or robot arms, to get meat to commune with silicon. Adam Rogers, Wired, "A New Way to Plug a Human Brain into a Computer: via Veins," 29 Oct. 2020 Brushwood Center, a nonprofit organization, is situated within Ryerson Woods, an ecological treasure in Lake County brimming with native plants, animals and trails where people can commune with nature. Sheryl Devore, chicagotribune.com, "Brushwood Center’s At Ease program combines art, nature to help veterans heal; ‘After the class you can see their inner light is shining’," 23 Oct. 2020 Montrealer Roxane Charest creates warm and inviting ceramic pieces that encourage you to sit down and commune with friends and family. Fiona Tapp, CNN Underscored, "Shop this exclusive line of handcrafted Canadian artisan products at Simons," 13 Oct. 2020 Online shops, however, are working to keep up with demand, and social media is providing a space to commune under a common adoration for tobacco. NBC News, "Black cigar smokers find community — and business opportunities — amid the pandemic," 6 Oct. 2020 Thus the scene that gallery goers can enter — whether to pose for a photo or just commune with the kitchen’s occupants — is 1953. Mark Jenkins, Washington Post, "In Alexandria, two art installations memorialize men and women who lived under exploitation," 17 Sep. 2020 Recent Examples on the Web: Noun As Mando paces in the background like a nervous dad, Ahsoka and Baby Yoda commune with each other silently through the Force. Lauren Morgan, EW.com, "The Mandalorian recap: Mando meets a Jedi legend — and learns Baby Yoda's name," 27 Nov. 2020 Ostensibly a work of horror, Aster’s movie evokes cult classics such as The Wicker Man, but its core is Dani’s deep yearning for a new family and a sense of belonging—something this ancient commune is all too happy to provide. David Sims, The Atlantic, "20 of the Best Films About Family for the Holidays," 21 Nov. 2020 But these rituals of business life, a chance for people to make deals, check out the competition and commune with others in the same walk of life, are in crisis. Jack Ewing, New York Times, "In a Year of No Trade Fairs, Germany Takes It Hard," 25 Nov. 2020 Tho said when a Times reporter visited him at his one-story home in the coastal commune of Binh Chau. Los Angeles Times, "Sunken boats. Stolen gear. Fishermen are prey as China conquers a strategic sea," 12 Nov. 2020 One of her favorites is a former commune in Northern California, now a 230-acre working farm that rents geodesic domes for $425 a night. Washington Post, "Hipcamp, Tentrr and the Dyrt: Trying out camping’s newest start-ups," 28 Aug. 2020 In the popular Treichville commune, more voters made it to the polls by midday. Hannane Ferdjani, Quartz Africa, "Ivorians are betting on peace as election tensions rise in Côte d’Ivoire with votes cast," 31 Oct. 2020 So the members of the commune crush his skull with an extremely large mallet. Troy L. Smith, cleveland, "30 best horror movie scenes of the 21st century," 29 Oct. 2020 The incident at the commune leaves Tamar shattered. Nina Zafar, Washington Post, "What to watch on Friday: ‘The Queen’s Gambit’ on Netflix," 23 Oct. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'commune.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of commune

Verb

15th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense

Noun

1673, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for commune

Verb

Middle English, to share, receive Communion, from Anglo-French communer, cummunier, from Late Latin communicare, from Latin — see communicate

Noun

French, alteration of Middle French comugne, from Medieval Latin communia, from Latin, neuter plural of communis

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Time Traveler for commune

Time Traveler

The first known use of commune was in the 15th century

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Statistics for commune

Last Updated

26 Nov 2020

Cite this Entry

“Commune.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/commune. Accessed 24 Jan. 2021.

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More Definitions for commune

commune

verb
How to pronounce commune (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of commune

 (Entry 1 of 2)

formal : to communicate with someone or something in a very personal or spiritual way

commune

noun
How to pronounce commune (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of commune (Entry 2 of 2)

: a group of people who live together and share responsibilities, possessions, etc.
: the smallest division of local government in some countries especially in Europe

commune

verb
com·​mune | \ kə-ˈmyün How to pronounce commune (audio) \
communed; communing

Kids Definition of commune

: to be in close accord or communication with someone or something He enjoys walking in the woods and communing with nature.

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Comments on commune

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