commonplace

adjective

Definition of commonplace

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: commonly found or seen : ordinary, unremarkable a commonplace occurrence the large mergers that had become commonplace Computers are commonplace in classrooms.

commonplace

noun
com·​mon·​place | \ ˈkä-mən-ˌplās How to pronounce commonplace (audio) \

Definition of commonplace (Entry 2 of 2)

1a : an obvious or trite comment : truism It is a commonplace that a fool and his money are soon parted.
b : something commonly found A smartphone is a commonplace.
2 archaic : a striking passage entered in a commonplace book

Keep scrolling for more

Other Words from commonplace

Adjective

commonplaceness noun

Examples of commonplace in a Sentence

Adjective Drug use has become commonplace at rock concerts. He photographed commonplace objects like lamps and bowls. Noun It is a commonplace that we only use a small part of our brain's capacity. We now accept cell phones and laptop computers as commonplaces of everyday life.
See More
Recent Examples on the Web: Adjective As has become commonplace with SpaceX, the rocket's first stage, after powering the spacecraft out of the thick lower atmosphere, will attempt to land on an off-shore droneship while the second stage continues the climb to orbit. William Harwood, CBS News, ""It's tremendously exciting": NASA astronauts counting down to historic launch aboard SpaceX Crew Dragon this week," 27 May 2020 What used to be one-off occurrences have become more and more commonplace with Muslim designers, entrepreneurs, and influencers making worldwide headlines every month. Fareeha Molvi, Allure, "11 Muslim Women in the Fashion-Beauty Industry Reveal Their Style Icons," 27 Mar. 2020 But so are other countries, most of which have acted far quicker in imposing the types of policies that would seem borderline authoritarian in normal times, but are increasingly commonplace now. Alexander Smith, NBC News, "Coronavirus: Johnson's libertarian views behind hesitancy to lock down Britain," 20 Mar. 2020 Making political hay of health scares is a commonplace activity that’s also unfailingly bipartisan. Jason L. Riley, WSJ, "Why a Pandemic Is Always Political," 10 Mar. 2020 Like his cohorts, Arhos doesn’t disguise his work’s commonplace origins. Mark Jenkins, Washington Post, "In the galleries: An artist conjures images from oceans to a micro view of nature," 20 Feb. 2020 The ritual, which first occurred in 1865 under President Andrew Johnson, became commonplace during President Ronald Reagan's administration, according to NPR. Mike Brest, Washington Examiner, "'That would be great': Kansas City Chiefs open to White House visit following Super Bowl victory," 3 Feb. 2020 Long ago, the technologies driving TVs and personal computers became so commonplace that good television sets and PCs became affordable for the masses. Brian X. Chen, New York Times, "Apple iPhone SE Review: A Superb Smartphone for a Humble Price," 6 May 2020 But those somewhat surreal scenes had become so commonplace that the events may have started to seem routine. John Timmer, Ars Technica, "Trump takes good news on disinfectants and gives it an insane spin," 24 Apr. 2020 Recent Examples on the Web: Noun In an occupied home, routinely bringing in prospective buyers went from commonplace to dangerous during the pandemic. Jeff Bollier, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, "Wisconsin Realtors expect virtual showings, closings to become the norm going forward," 28 May 2020 While nonstop global news about the effects of the coronavirus have become commonplace, so, too, are tales of the kindness. Staff, The Christian Science Monitor, "On #143Day, Pennsylvania shows kindness cannot be locked down," 23 May 2020 Yet, this time around the inquiry isn’t as commonplace. Tyler Dragon, Cincinnati.com, "Cincinnati Bengals great Ken Anderson is used to Hall of Fame questions. Just not in July.," 7 July 2019 What’s taken as commonplace or quirkily charming in white men is seen as objectionable in others. Jennifer Wright, Harper's BAZAAR, "Bernie Sanders' Sexism Problem," 27 Feb. 2019 In a world of fake news, anyone can write a story that seems reliable; soon generating fake videos will become as commonplace. Catherine F. Brooks, WIRED, "Faked Video Could End Justice by Twitter Mob," 18 June 2018 To bridge the gap in care, telemedicine has become commonplace to treat acne and rosacea, check in with patients who need prescription refills, and do consultations. Lexy Lebsack, refinery29.com, "COVID-19 Will Change Cosmetic Dermatology & Plastic Surgery Forever," 12 May 2020 Examples of why are commonplace in its health-care industry. Irina Vilcu, Bloomberg.com, "Health Care Is Killing Patients in Europe’s Most Corrupt Region," 29 Apr. 2020 Instead, they have been posted online in draft form (a commonplace occurrence amid a rapidly evolving pandemic that inclines researchers to have fast access to data, however uncertain). Beth Mole, Ars Technica, "Experts demolish studies suggesting COVID-19 is no worse than flu," 24 Apr. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'commonplace.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

See More

First Known Use of commonplace

Adjective

1609, in the meaning defined above

Noun

1561, in the meaning defined at sense 2

History and Etymology for commonplace

Noun and Adjective

translation of Latin locus communis widely applicable argument, translation of Greek koinos topos

Keep scrolling for more

Learn More about commonplace

Time Traveler for commonplace

Time Traveler

The first known use of commonplace was in 1561

See more words from the same year

Statistics for commonplace

Last Updated

2 Jun 2020

Cite this Entry

“Commonplace.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/commonplace. Accessed 7 Jun. 2020.

Keep scrolling for more

More Definitions for commonplace

commonplace

adjective

English Language Learners Definition of commonplace

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: happening or appearing in many places and not unusual : very common or ordinary

commonplace

noun
How to pronounce commonplace (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of commonplace (Entry 2 of 2)

formal
: an idea, expression, remark, etc., that is not new or interesting
: something that happens or appears in many places and is not unusual

commonplace

adjective
com·​mon·​place | \ ˈkä-mən-ˌplās How to pronounce commonplace (audio) \

Kids Definition of commonplace

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: often seen or met with : ordinary He draws commonplace objects, like fences.

commonplace

noun

Kids Definition of commonplace (Entry 2 of 2)

: something that is often seen or met with Crowds are a commonplace of city life.

Keep scrolling for more

Comments on commonplace

What made you want to look up commonplace? Please tell us where you read or heard it (including the quote, if possible).

WORD OF THE DAY

See Definitions and Examples »

Get Word of the Day daily email!

Test Your Vocabulary

May 2020 Words of the Day Quiz

  • a blooming wisteria tree
  • Which is a synonym of exiguous?
Spell It

Can you spell these 10 commonly misspelled words?

TAKE THE QUIZ
Syn City

Test Your Knowledge - and learn some interesting things along the way.

TAKE THE QUIZ
Love words? Need even more definitions?

Subscribe to America's largest dictionary and get thousands more definitions and advanced search—ad free!