commonplace

adjective

Definition of commonplace

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: commonly found or seen : ordinary, unremarkable a commonplace occurrence the large mergers that had become commonplace Computers are commonplace in classrooms.

commonplace

noun
com·​mon·​place | \ ˈkä-mən-ˌplās How to pronounce commonplace (audio) \

Definition of commonplace (Entry 2 of 2)

1a : an obvious or trite comment : truism It is a commonplace that a fool and his money are soon parted.
b : something commonly found A smartphone is a commonplace.
2 archaic : a striking passage entered in a commonplace book

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Other Words from commonplace

Adjective

commonplaceness noun

Examples of commonplace in a Sentence

Adjective Drug use has become commonplace at rock concerts. He photographed commonplace objects like lamps and bowls. Noun It is a commonplace that we only use a small part of our brain's capacity. We now accept cell phones and laptop computers as commonplaces of everyday life.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Adjective Long ago, the technologies driving TVs and personal computers became so commonplace that good television sets and PCs became affordable for the masses. Brian X. Chen, New York Times, "Apple iPhone SE Review: A Superb Smartphone for a Humble Price," 6 May 2020 But those somewhat surreal scenes had become so commonplace that the events may have started to seem routine. John Timmer, Ars Technica, "Trump takes good news on disinfectants and gives it an insane spin," 24 Apr. 2020 The piece is an example of the axe-grinding ideology pretending to be news that has become commonplace when our country can least afford it. Ken Langone, National Review, "It’s Time for the Press to Play by the Rules Too," 22 Apr. 2020 Hydrazine, with its many protocols and procedures, simply doesn’t fit into a future where rocket launches around the world become commonplace. David Grossman, Popular Mechanics, "Plasma Thrusters Are About To Have Their Moment," 30 Aug. 2018 The practice was already commonplace in the state, spurred by the tech industry. Patrick J. Lyons, New York Times, "Coronavirus Briefing: What Happened Today," 14 Apr. 2020 Such drugs are commonplace in treating cancer, rheumatoid arthritis, infectious diseases like Ebola, and other conditions, and represent a $50 billion annual market in the US that includes six of the country’s top 15 selling drugs. Tim Mcdonnell, Quartz, "A ‘bridge to a vaccine’: The race to roll out antibody-based Covid-19 drugs," 8 Apr. 2020 Fire drills became commonplace in schools after 1958 – when a student at a Chicago parochial school started a fire in the building’s boiler room. Jaclyn Schildkraut, The Conversation, "Schools should heed calls to do lockdown drills without traumatizing kids instead of abolishing them," 12 Feb. 2020 Stories of start-up fails are commonplace in the 21st century. Marcia Chatelain, The Atlantic, "The United States of Franchising," 6 Feb. 2020 Recent Examples on the Web: Noun To bridge the gap in care, telemedicine has become commonplace to treat acne and rosacea, check in with patients who need prescription refills, and do consultations. Lexy Lebsack, refinery29.com, "COVID-19 Will Change Cosmetic Dermatology & Plastic Surgery Forever," 12 May 2020 Examples of why are commonplace in its health-care industry. Irina Vilcu, Bloomberg.com, "Health Care Is Killing Patients in Europe’s Most Corrupt Region," 29 Apr. 2020 Instead, they have been posted online in draft form (a commonplace occurrence amid a rapidly evolving pandemic that inclines researchers to have fast access to data, however uncertain). Beth Mole, Ars Technica, "Experts demolish studies suggesting COVID-19 is no worse than flu," 24 Apr. 2020 Feeling some kind of way about once-commonplace and -ordinary interactions, whether that’s fear or disgust, might be beneficial, though. Marina Koren, The Atlantic, "The New Cringeworthy," 17 Apr. 2020 Despite annual budgets running into hundreds of millions of dollars for public health, stories of oxygen shortages in public hospitals and surgeries being conducted without electricity remain commonplace in Nigeria. Yomi Kazeem, Quartz Africa, "Coronavirus is forcing Nigeria’s leaders to confront the broken health system they rarely use," 31 Mar. 2020 But there's nothing at all commonplace about the engine that motivates the QX50. Jared Gall, Car and Driver, "Our 2019 Infiniti QX50 Underwhelms in its Complexity," 10 Mar. 2020 In New York, as in other urban sites that have decriminalized the substance, smoking marijuana in public is commonplace. Spencer Neale, Washington Examiner, "'Help me!': Police aggressively arrest black man allegedly smoking marijuana," 5 Mar. 2020 Once an unusual occurrence, the West Coast blazes have grown more commonplace in recent years as a result of overgrown forests, climate crises, and construction in fire-prone areas. Natasha Frost, Quartz, "Trump is threatening to pull federal funding for the California wildfires," 3 Nov. 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'commonplace.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of commonplace

Adjective

1609, in the meaning defined above

Noun

1561, in the meaning defined at sense 2

History and Etymology for commonplace

Noun and Adjective

translation of Latin locus communis widely applicable argument, translation of Greek koinos topos

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Time Traveler for commonplace

Time Traveler

The first known use of commonplace was in 1561

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Statistics for commonplace

Last Updated

19 May 2020

Cite this Entry

“Commonplace.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/commonplace. Accessed 31 May. 2020.

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More Definitions for commonplace

commonplace

adjective

English Language Learners Definition of commonplace

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: happening or appearing in many places and not unusual : very common or ordinary

commonplace

noun
How to pronounce commonplace (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of commonplace (Entry 2 of 2)

formal
: an idea, expression, remark, etc., that is not new or interesting
: something that happens or appears in many places and is not unusual

commonplace

adjective
com·​mon·​place | \ ˈkä-mən-ˌplās How to pronounce commonplace (audio) \

Kids Definition of commonplace

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: often seen or met with : ordinary He draws commonplace objects, like fences.

commonplace

noun

Kids Definition of commonplace (Entry 2 of 2)

: something that is often seen or met with Crowds are a commonplace of city life.

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Comments on commonplace

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