commonplace

adjective

Definition of commonplace

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: commonly found or seen : ordinary, unremarkable a commonplace occurrence the large mergers that had become commonplace Computers are commonplace in classrooms.

commonplace

noun
com·​mon·​place | \ ˈkä-mən-ˌplās How to pronounce commonplace (audio) \

Definition of commonplace (Entry 2 of 2)

1a : an obvious or trite comment : truism It is a commonplace that a fool and his money are soon parted.
b : something commonly found A smartphone is a commonplace.
2 archaic : a striking passage entered in a commonplace book

Keep scrolling for more

Other Words from commonplace

Adjective

commonplaceness noun

Examples of commonplace in a Sentence

Adjective

Drug use has become commonplace at rock concerts. He photographed commonplace objects like lamps and bowls.

Noun

It is a commonplace that we only use a small part of our brain's capacity. We now accept cell phones and laptop computers as commonplaces of everyday life.
See More

Recent Examples on the Web: Adjective

As a black referee in England's football pyramid, Mannix says such incidents of discrimination towards minority officials are commonplace. Matias Grez, Zayn Nabbi And Darren Lewis, CNN, "How the scourge of racism continues to tarnish English football," 10 Sep. 2019 The attack on female politicians of all shapes and political beliefs is commonplace, particularly from the right wing. Annalisa Merelli, Quartz, "Italy’s new agriculture minister is truly of the people—and she’s kryptonite for populists," 7 Sep. 2019 After all, touchscreens are now so commonplace that even little kids seem to think non-responsive objects should be swipeable, as WIRED’s Arielle Pardes points out. Lauren Goode, WIRED, "Touchless Gesture Controls on Phones? Think Bigger," 12 Aug. 2019 Pet relief stations will become more commonplace, both before and after airport security. Katherine Lagrave, Condé Nast Traveler, "How Flying With Pets Will Change in 2019," 14 Dec. 2018 Stories of abusive Catholic priests are commonplace, but a similar, less publicly familiar crisis has also been unfolding in certain Orthodox Jewish communities—particularly in New York—over the past several decades. Linda Stasi, Harper's magazine, "Secrets and Lies," 16 Sep. 2019 Such worries are commonplace throughout U.S. history — in the early 1800s, Federalists and Whigs fretted that Democrats were importing Irish votes. Noah Smith, Twin Cities, "Noah Smith: Ronald Reagan, the diversity president," 8 Sep. 2019 This is all based on a true story — based on an actual lie, as the title card puts it — that apparently reflects a commonplace Chinese approach to grim diagnoses. Ross Douthat, National Review, "The Farewell: A Restrained Deathbed Drama," 22 Aug. 2019 And, as insurance becomes more commonplace, fewer, presumably, will be so taken by surprise. The Economist, "The poor, who most need insurance, are least likely to have it," 22 Aug. 2019

Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

Taco Tuesday’ as commonplace achieves precisely what the intended outcome was, which was getting the U.S. government to recognize that someone cannot be sued for its use. Lindsay Kimble, PEOPLE.com, "LeBron James' Attempt to Trademark 'Taco Tuesday' Has Been Denied," 12 Sep. 2019 But as subscriptions become more commonplace in the gaming industry, some might wonder how Apple's service compares. Lisa Marie Segarra, Fortune, "Sizing Up Apple Arcade, the Newest Contender in the Game Subscription Category," 11 Sep. 2019 Talk about Europe’s strategic autonomy is commonplace, and German chancellor Angela Merkel has, at least rhetorically, lumped the United States and China together as global rivals to Europe. Scott Cullinane, National Review, "American–European Unity against China Is Indispensable," 5 Sep. 2019 So what was supposed to be khaas (special) became an aam (commonplace) thing. Kuwar Singh, Quartz India, "How Indian restaurateurs united on WhatsApp in five hours to fight food-delivery apps," 27 Aug. 2019 And the technology to digitize locks is becoming more commonplace. Mike Murphy, Quartz, "Apple is going to be the company that kills the wallet," 17 Aug. 2019 For Sandra and her husband Robert, seeing some of Arizona's more exotic wildlife is about as commonplace as seeing their three rescue dogs lounging around on the sofas. azcentral, "Couple downsizes but upgrades their Fountain Hills home with help of former Suns player. Take a look," 8 Aug. 2019 While hardly commonplace in school yards, bullet-resistant backpacks have been on the market for years, with a company called Guard Dog Security debuting them shortly after the Sandy Hook elementary school shooting in 2012. Kate Gibson, CBS News, "Bullet-resistant backpacks marketed to back-to-school shoppers," 6 Aug. 2019 In the analog world, then, official changes to meaning and usage were subject to considerable scrutiny, discouraging the institutionalization of commonplace mistakes. Lionel Shriver, Harper's magazine, "Semantic Drift," 22 July 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'commonplace.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

See More

First Known Use of commonplace

Adjective

1609, in the meaning defined above

Noun

1561, in the meaning defined at sense 2

History and Etymology for commonplace

Noun and Adjective

translation of Latin locus communis widely applicable argument, translation of Greek koinos topos

Keep scrolling for more

Learn More about commonplace

Statistics for commonplace

Last Updated

7 Oct 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for commonplace

The first known use of commonplace was in 1561

See more words from the same year

Keep scrolling for more

More Definitions for commonplace

commonplace

adjective

English Language Learners Definition of commonplace

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: happening or appearing in many places and not unusual : very common or ordinary

commonplace

noun

English Language Learners Definition of commonplace (Entry 2 of 2)

formal
: an idea, expression, remark, etc., that is not new or interesting
: something that happens or appears in many places and is not unusual

commonplace

adjective
com·​mon·​place | \ ˈkä-mən-ˌplās How to pronounce commonplace (audio) \

Kids Definition of commonplace

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: often seen or met with : ordinary He draws commonplace objects, like fences.

commonplace

noun

Kids Definition of commonplace (Entry 2 of 2)

: something that is often seen or met with Crowds are a commonplace of city life.

Keep scrolling for more

Comments on commonplace

What made you want to look up commonplace? Please tell us where you read or heard it (including the quote, if possible).

WORD OF THE DAY

to fake an opponent out of position

Get Word of the Day daily email!

Test Your Vocabulary

Where in the World? A Quiz

  • peter bruegel tower of babel painting
  • What language does pajama come from?
Spell It

Can you spell these 10 commonly misspelled words?

TAKE THE QUIZ
Citation

Test Your Knowledge - and learn some interesting things along the way.

TAKE THE QUIZ
Love words? Need even more definitions?

Subscribe to America's largest dictionary and get thousands more definitions and advanced search—ad free!