column

noun
col·​umn | \ ˈkä-ləm How to pronounce column (audio) also ˈkäl-yəm \

Definition of column

1a : a vertical arrangement of items printed or written on a page columns of numbers
b : one of two or more vertical sections of a printed page separated by a rule or blank space The news article takes up three columns.
c : an accumulation arranged vertically : stack columns of paint cans
d : one in a usually regular series of newspaper or magazine articles the gossip column advice columns
2 : a supporting pillar especially : one consisting of a usually round shaft, a capital, and a base a colonnade of marble columns
3a : something resembling a column in form, position, or function a column of water columns of smoke
b : a tube or cylinder in which a chromatographic separation takes place
4 : a long row (as of soldiers) columns of troops
5 : one of the vertical lines of elements of a determinant or matrix
6 : a statistical category or grouping put another game in the win column

Illustration of column

Illustration of column

column 2

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Other Words from column

columned \ ˈkä-​ləmd How to pronounce column (audio) , ˈkäl-​yəmd \ adjective

Synonyms for column

Synonyms

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Examples of column in a Sentence

a facade with marble columns Add the first column of numbers. The article takes up three columns. The error appears at the bottom of the second column. She writes a weekly column for the paper.
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Recent Examples on the Web Peter Pennoyer, a New York architect and architectural historian, says Pope was a master of the column. J.s. Marcus, WSJ, "John Russell Pope’s Charlcote House in Baltimore Lists for $4.995 Million," 11 May 2021 Readers of this column might remember that section. Arkansas Online, "Facebook, etc.," 8 May 2021 More worrisome was the fact that inspections after the quake found that one of the horizontal beams had come loose from its support at the top of a column and was sagging downward. Mark Stevenson, Star Tribune, "Mexico City subway collapse was a tragedy foretold," 5 May 2021 Think of this column as my down payment, just a small one, on both tasks. Scott Burns, Dallas News, "We need to save the world. First let’s fix Monopoly," 25 Apr. 2021 The purpose of this column is to offer support and non-professional guidance to families and individuals that may have had experience with issues relating to addiction and recovery. Tammy Lofink, baltimoresun.com/maryland/carroll, "Ask Tammy Lofink: Resources can help to support recovery from addiction," 24 Apr. 2021 An earlier version of this column misidentified Grace Cruz in a photo caption. Gustavo Arellano, Los Angeles Times, "Column: Lost for decades, a World War II hero finally comes home," 16 Apr. 2021 Exactly what such an effort looks like may be outside the scope of this column, but any successful approach will need to meld outreach with tangible political efforts. Isaac Schorr, National Review, "A Wake-Up Call for Conservatives," 14 Apr. 2021 Really, any reader of this column should be a member already, but if not, now is the time. Jeff Lowenfels, Anchorage Daily News, "You might not like to eat kale, but it will look great in your yard," 8 Apr. 2021

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'column.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of column

15th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

History and Etymology for column

Middle English columne, from Anglo-French columpne, from Latin columna, from columen top; akin to Latin collis hill — more at hill

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Time Traveler for column

Time Traveler

The first known use of column was in the 15th century

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Statistics for column

Last Updated

14 May 2021

Cite this Entry

“Column.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/column. Accessed 15 May. 2021.

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More Definitions for column

column

noun

English Language Learners Definition of column

: a long post made of steel, stone, etc., that is used as a support in a building
: a group of printed or written items (such as numbers or words) shown one under the other down a page
: any one of two or more sections of print that appear next to each other on a page and are separated by a blank space or a line

column

noun
col·​umn | \ ˈkä-ləm How to pronounce column (audio) \

Kids Definition of column

1 : one of two or more vertical sections of a printed page Read the article in the left column.
2 : a group of items shown one under the other down a page a column of figures
3 : a regular feature in a newspaper or magazine a sports column
4 : a pillar used to support a building
5 : something that is tall or thin in shape or arrangement a column of smoke
6 : a long straight row a column of soldiers

column

noun
col·​umn | \ ˈkäl-əm How to pronounce column (audio) \

Medical Definition of column

: a longitudinal subdivision of the spinal cord that resembles a column or pillar: as
a : any of the principal longitudinal subdivisions of gray matter or white matter in each lateral half of the spinal cord — see dorsal horn, gray column, lateral column sense 1, ventral horn — compare funiculus sense a
b : any of a number of smaller bundles of spinal nerve fibers : fasciculus

Comments on column

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