cohere

verb
co·​here | \ kō-ˈhir How to pronounce cohere (audio) \
cohered; cohering

Definition of cohere

intransitive verb

1a : to hold together firmly as parts of the same mass broadly : stick, adhere
b : to display cohesion of plant parts
2 : to hold together as a mass of parts that cohere
3a : to become united in principles, relationships, or interests
b : to be logically or aesthetically consistent

transitive verb

: to cause (parts or components) to cohere

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Choose the Right Synonym for cohere

stick, adhere, cohere, cling, cleave mean to become closely attached. stick implies attachment by affixing or by being glued together. couldn't get the label to stick adhere is often interchangeable with stick but sometimes implies a growing together. antibodies adhering to a virus cohere suggests a sticking together of parts so that they form a unified mass. eggs will make the mixture cohere cling implies attachment by hanging on with arms or tendrils. clinging to a capsized boat cleave stresses strength of attachment. the wet shirt cleaved to his back

Cohere vs Adhere

When you finish writing a paper, you may feel that it coheres well, since it's sharply focused and all the ideas seem to support each other. When all the soldiers in an army platoon feel like buddies, the platoon has become a cohesive unit. In science class you may learn the difference between cohesion (the tendency of a chemical's molecules to stick together) and adhesion (the tendency of the molecules of two different substances to stick together). Water molecules tend to cohere, so water falls from the sky in drops, not as separate molecules. But water molecules also adhere to molecules of other substances, so raindrops will often cling to the underside of a clothesline for a while before gravity pulls them down.

Examples of cohere in a Sentence

the account in his journal coheres with the official report of the battle beset by personal animosities, the people of the neighborhood could not cohere into an effective civic association
Recent Examples on the Web An advertising creative, Carmen is the global champion of colourblocking, with outfits that blur the line between professional and playful, often composed of more than three clashing shades that somehow cohere into a single work-ready look. Frances Solá-santiago, refinery29.com, 8 Sep. 2021 For the most part, the conceit fails to cohere with Wagner’s drama, though the subway sequences attain a surreal poetry. Alex Ross, The New Yorker, 19 July 2021 An advertising creative, Carmen is the global champion of colourblocking, with outfits that blur the line between professional and playful, often composed of more than three clashing shades that somehow cohere into a single work-ready look. Frances Solá-santiago, refinery29.com, 5 Sep. 2021 The images also don’t make sense as a whole; their components don’t cohere into a unified composition. Kyle Chayka, The New Yorker, 13 Aug. 2021 But just as national identity can stabilize and cohere, it can also be used to disrupt and make new demands. Alex Shephard, The New Republic, 11 Aug. 2021 By the end of this new Candyman, little personal investment remains for the audience, just a miasma of provocative thoughts failing to cohere into something greater. David Sims, The Atlantic, 25 Aug. 2021 All divers must ultimately deal with the fact that molecules along the surface of the water cohere more strongly than those below. Los Angeles Times, 29 July 2021 Some of the essays don’t completely cohere, but even those ones at least contain insights into the writing life. Alice Mcdermott, BostonGlobe.com, 12 Aug. 2021

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'cohere.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of cohere

1598, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense 1a

History and Etymology for cohere

borrowed from Latin cohaerēre "to stick together, be in contact with, be connected," from co- co- + haerēre "to be closely attached, stick," going back to a stem *hais-, of obscure origin

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Learn More About cohere

Dictionary Entries Near cohere

Cohen-Tannoudji

cohere

coherence

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Statistics for cohere

Last Updated

8 Oct 2021

Cite this Entry

“Cohere.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/cohere. Accessed 18 Oct. 2021.

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More Definitions for cohere

cohere

verb

English Language Learners Definition of cohere

: to be combined or united in a logical and effective way

More from Merriam-Webster on cohere

Nglish: Translation of cohere for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of cohere for Arabic Speakers

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