charter

noun
char·​ter | \ ˈchär-tər How to pronounce charter (audio) \

Definition of charter

 (Entry 1 of 3)

1 : a written instrument (see instrument entry 1 sense 5) or contract (such as a deed) executed in due form
2a : a grant or guarantee of rights, franchises, or privileges from the sovereign power of a state or country The charter allows for unrestricted trading.
b : a written instrument that creates and defines the franchises (see franchise entry 1 sense 1) of a city, educational institution, or corporation a city charter a corporate charter
c : constitution the Charter of the United Nations
3 : a written instrument from the authorities of a society creating a lodge or branch The national headquarters approved the charter establishing the local lodge.
4 : a special privilege, immunity, or exemption
5 : a mercantile lease of a ship or some principal part of it In the charter the ship's owner agreed to transport specified cargo to a specified port.
6a : a charter travel arrangement An agent handled the charter providing aircraft travel to and from the tournament.
b : a chartered plane, bus, etc. Their charter had just landed at Toronto's Pearson International Airport and … everyone in the Mariners' traveling party had to slog through a tedious customs check and then claim his own luggage.— Jeff Pearlman
7 : charter school He pushed for the closure of Chicago's worst schools … and opened dozens of new schools, many of them charters.— Amanda Paulson et al.

charter

verb
chartered; chartering; charters

Definition of charter (Entry 2 of 3)

transitive verb

1a : to establish, enable, or convey by charter The city was chartered in 1837.
b British : certify a chartered mechanical engineer
2 : to hire, rent, or lease for usually exclusive and temporary use chartered a boat for deep-sea fishing

charter

adjective

Definition of charter (Entry 3 of 3)

: of, relating to, or being a travel arrangement in which transportation (such as a bus or plane) is hired by and for one specific group of people a charter flight

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Other Words from charter

Verb

charterer \ ˈchär-​tər-​ər How to pronounce charterer (audio) \ noun

Synonyms for charter

Synonyms: Verb

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Choose the Right Synonym for charter

Verb

hire, let, lease, rent, charter mean to engage or grant for use at a price. hire and let, strictly speaking, are complementary terms, hire implying the act of engaging or taking for use and let the granting of use. we hired a car for the summer decided to let the cottage to a young couple lease strictly implies a letting under the terms of a contract but is often applied to hiring on a lease. the diplomat leased an apartment for a year rent stresses the payment of money for the full use of property and may imply either hiring or letting. instead of buying a house, they decided to rent will not rent to families with children charter applies to the hiring or letting of a vehicle usually for exclusive use. charter a bus to go to the game

Examples of charter in a Sentence

Noun The charter allows for unrestricted trading. Verb The city was chartered in 1837. The team chartered a plane.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun The charter, which essentially rented the boat from Holland America, had already spent much of the money the cruisers prepaid. Emily Palmer, New York Times, "No ‘Prairie Home Companion’ at Sea, and So Far, No Refund, Either," 18 May 2020 Russian Ambassador to the U.S. Anatoly Antonov wrote on Facebook on April 6 that there are too few Russians asking for evacuation to justify the cost of a charter back to Moscow. NBC News, "Graphic: Coronavirus deaths in the U.S., per day," 8 Apr. 2020 There was an attempt to negotiate a transfer of the Covenant Keepers charter to Friendship Education Foundation -- the sponsoring organization for the Friendship Aspire Academy -- but that failed. Cynthia Howell, Arkansas Online, "State: Closed Arkansas charter school's chief in contempt," 23 Dec. 2019 The board also voted unanimously to rescind the charter for Chicago Virtual Charter School. Hannah Leone, chicagotribune.com, "Chicago Board of Ed votes to close 2 charter schools, including Illinois’ first online public school: ‘You are breaking apart my family.’," 12 Dec. 2019 The diver was aboard the charter Lady Go Diver, a boat owned by Dixie Divers, a dive shop in Deerfield Beach. Andrew Boryga, sun-sentinel.com, "With search underway for missing diver, questions remain about health and safety," 2 Oct. 2019 The charter allows technical support for all AU electoral missions. John J Stremlau, Quartz Africa, "The Trump circus was a distraction from Africa’s climate change fight at the UN summit," 2 Oct. 2019 Facebook itself can also ask for reviews, the charter said. Ethan Baron, The Mercury News, "Facebook reveals how its content-dispute final-appeals board will work," 17 Sep. 2019 Thanathorn rattled the royalist establishment by attracting younger voters to a reformist agenda that included tearing up the current charter, breaking up oligopolies and preventing coups in a country with a history of army takeovers. Randy Thanthong-knight, Bloomberg.com, "Students Step Up Protests Against Thailand’s Army-Backed Premier," 10 May 2020 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb At least six supertankers have been chartered to haul U.S. crude to Asia for June loading, fixture reports compiled by Bloomberg show. Firat Kayakiran, Bloomberg.com, "China’s Oil Thirst Draws an Armada of Tankers," 31 May 2020 Yiwu has chartered trains and buses to bring in workers from around the country. The Economist, "Covid-19 and China’s economy With its epidemic slowing, China tries to get back to work," 27 Feb. 2020 The very land on which Congress now sits was first colonized by theVirginia Company of London, a joint-stock company chartered by King James I and his fellow shareholders. Olúfẹ́mi Táíwò, The New Republic, "Corporations Are Salivating Over the Coronavirus Pandemic," 3 Apr. 2020 The include: Companies that specialize in chartering private jets are allowed to have as many as 1,500 employees and still qualify for a PPP loan. Stephen Gandel, CBS News, "Paycheck Protection Program replenished, but still plenty of loopholes," 29 Apr. 2020 Some companies have also stepped up their hunt for vessels to hold oil at sea, prompting a spike in the number of tankers chartered for such purposes. Sharon Cho, Bloomberg.com, "South Korea Out of Onshore Oil Storage for Third-Party Lease," 28 Apr. 2020 The airline will charter eight flights between London and Shanghai to bring supplies to the UK’s National Health Service. Alison Fox, Travel + Leisure, "Virgin Atlantic Temporarily Suspends All Passenger Flights, JetBlue Cuts Flights at Major Hubs As Coronavirus Pandemic Continues (Video)," 10 Apr. 2020 Small businesses in Vermont chartered a private plane filled with Coronavirus tests to those in need. James Barrett, Redbook, "Good News and Inspiring Stories From the Pandemic to Lift Your Spirits," 6 Apr. 2020 In late March, desperate asparagus farmers chartered a plane to fly in 190 Romanians. The Economist, "Farmhands needed When borders close, who will pick the crops?," 4 Apr. 2020 Recent Examples on the Web: Adjective The report said none of the charter flights complied. NBC News, "Watchdog: $341,000 wasted on travel for former high-flying HHS chief Tom Price," 13 July 2018 Justifications for using charter flights were sometimes flimsy, the report concluded. Louise Radnofsky, WSJ, "HHS Watchdog Pushes to Recoup $341,000 Wasted by Ex-Secretary Price on Travel," 13 July 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'charter.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of charter

Noun

13th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

15th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Adjective

1922, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for charter

Noun and Verb

Middle English chartre, from Anglo-French, from Medieval Latin chartula, from Latin, diminutive of charta — see chart entry 1

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Time Traveler for charter

Time Traveler

The first known use of charter was in the 13th century

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Statistics for charter

Last Updated

4 Jun 2020

Cite this Entry

“Charter.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/charter. Accessed 7 Jun. 2020.

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More Definitions for charter

charter

noun
How to pronounce charter (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of charter

 (Entry 1 of 3)

: a document issued by a government that gives rights to a person or group
: a document which declares that a city, town, school, or corporation has been established
: a document that describes the basic laws, principles, etc., of a group

charter

verb

English Language Learners Definition of charter (Entry 2 of 3)

: to give a charter to (a government, corporation, etc.)
: to hire (a ship, bus, etc.) for temporary use

charter

adjective

English Language Learners Definition of charter (Entry 3 of 3)

: hired for temporary use

charter

noun
char·​ter | \ ˈchär-tər How to pronounce charter (audio) \

Kids Definition of charter

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : an official document setting out the rights and duties of a group The charter grants broad trading rights.
2 : a document which declares that a city, town, school, or corporation has been established
3 : a document that describes the basic laws or principles of a group the charity's charter

charter

verb
chartered; chartering

Kids Definition of charter (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : to grant a charter to The city was chartered in 1853.
2 : to hire (as a bus or an aircraft) for temporary use The team chartered a plane.

charter

noun
char·​ter

Legal Definition of charter

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1a : a grant or guarantee of rights, powers, or privileges from an authority or agency of a state or country a state bank charter — compare constitution
b : a written instrument that creates and defines the powers and privileges of a city, educational institution, or corporation — compare articles of incorporation
2 : a written instrument from the authorities of a society creating a lodge, branch, or chapter
3 : a lease of a ship especially for the delivery of cargo

called also charter party

Legal Definition of charter (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : to establish, enable, or convey by charter charter a bank
2 : to lease or hire for usually exclusive and temporary use charter a ship

History and Etymology for charter

Noun

Old French chartre letter, formal document, from Late Latin chartula, from Latin, diminutive of charta sheet of papyrus

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