charter

noun
char·​ter | \ ˈchär-tər How to pronounce charter (audio) \

Definition of charter

 (Entry 1 of 3)

1 : a written instrument (see instrument entry 1 sense 5) or contract (such as a deed) executed in due form
2a : a grant or guarantee of rights, franchises, or privileges from the sovereign power of a state or country The charter allows for unrestricted trading.
b : a written instrument that creates and defines the franchises (see franchise entry 1 sense 1) of a city, educational institution, or corporation a city charter a corporate charter
c : constitution the Charter of the United Nations
3 : a written instrument from the authorities of a society creating a lodge or branch The national headquarters approved the charter establishing the local lodge.
4 : a special privilege, immunity, or exemption
5 : a mercantile lease of a ship or some principal part of it In the charter the ship's owner agreed to transport specified cargo to a specified port.
6a : a charter travel arrangement An agent handled the charter providing aircraft travel to and from the tournament.
b : a chartered plane, bus, etc. Their charter had just landed at Toronto's Pearson International Airport and … everyone in the Mariners' traveling party had to slog through a tedious customs check and then claim his own luggage.— Jeff Pearlman
7 : charter school He pushed for the closure of Chicago's worst schools … and opened dozens of new schools, many of them charters.— Amanda Paulson et al.

charter

verb
chartered; chartering; charters

Definition of charter (Entry 2 of 3)

transitive verb

1a : to establish, enable, or convey by charter The city was chartered in 1837.
b British : certify a chartered mechanical engineer
2 : to hire, rent, or lease for usually exclusive and temporary use chartered a boat for deep-sea fishing

charter

adjective

Definition of charter (Entry 3 of 3)

: of, relating to, or being a travel arrangement in which transportation (such as a bus or plane) is hired by and for one specific group of people a charter flight

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Other Words from charter

Verb

charterer \ ˈchär-​tər-​ər How to pronounce charter (audio) \ noun

Synonyms for charter

Synonyms: Verb

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Choose the Right Synonym for charter

Verb

hire, let, lease, rent, charter mean to engage or grant for use at a price. hire and let, strictly speaking, are complementary terms, hire implying the act of engaging or taking for use and let the granting of use. we hired a car for the summer decided to let the cottage to a young couple lease strictly implies a letting under the terms of a contract but is often applied to hiring on a lease. the diplomat leased an apartment for a year rent stresses the payment of money for the full use of property and may imply either hiring or letting. instead of buying a house, they decided to rent will not rent to families with children charter applies to the hiring or letting of a vehicle usually for exclusive use. charter a bus to go to the game

Examples of charter in a Sentence

Noun The charter allows for unrestricted trading. Verb The city was chartered in 1837. The team chartered a plane.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun In the 2020-2021 school year, the Osceola school district allocated about $770,000 of its $4.4 million school safety budget to staffing charter schools, according to budget documents. Cristóbal Reyes, orlandosentinel.com, "Osceola SRO task force releases final recommendations ahead of contentious meeting," 29 Apr. 2021 Lawmakers passed the Fairness in Women's Sports Act on Wednesday as a last-second amendment to a bill affecting charter schools in the state. Jeremy Beaman, Washington Examiner, "Florida Legislature approves bill barring transgender girls from competing as girls on school teams," 29 Apr. 2021 That decision has been driven, in part, by student mobility as thousands of families have left DISD for charter schools. Corbett Smith, Dallas News, "Candidates in Dallas ISD’s lone trustee race differ on school choice, ‘Black Lives Matter’ resolution," 29 Apr. 2021 Republicans tacked on the transgender ban as an amendment to a charter schools bill. Skyler Swisher, sun-sentinel.com, "‘Shocked and appalled’: How Florida lawmakers resurrected a transgender athlete ban, angered an FSU quarterback and left Democrats fuming," 29 Apr. 2021 Under the new law, public schools, charter schools and private schools in the voucher program must include instruction on the Holocaust and other genocides at least once between fifth and eighth grade and once in high school. Scott Bauer, Star Tribune, "Wisconsin schools required to teach Holocaust under new law," 28 Apr. 2021 The school district tried to hire a reopening consultant nearly a year ago, but the school board rejected the idea because the firm recommended by Superintendent Vince Matthews had worked with charter schools in the past. Jill Tucker, San Francisco Chronicle, "S.F. schools seek reopening consultant a year after the board shot down the idea," 28 Apr. 2021 Of 1,975 charter schools ranked nationwide, 42 Massachusetts schools made the list. BostonGlobe.com, "Here are the top Massachusetts high schools, according to the 2021 rankings from US News & World Report," 27 Apr. 2021 There are some big variations among the state’s 2,291 districts and charter schools. John Fensterwald, Los Angeles Times, "Kindergarten declines fuel steep drop in public school enrollment amid pandemic," 23 Apr. 2021 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb Better yet, charter your own boat and sail this paradise in the Antilles. Kerri Westenberg, chicagotribune.com, "Celebrate a return to travel with these 7 must-see destinations," 28 Apr. 2021 When the auction was over, bidders had spent a record-shattering $81 billion to charter critical frequencies in a part of the spectrum called the mid-band. Forbes, "Why Mid-Band Spectrum Is The 5G Sweet Spot," 20 Apr. 2021 Today visitors can charter the boat from the Astrups to sail up to Kiwayu, a secluded but mesmerizingly beautiful islet near the Somali border. Peter Browne, Condé Nast Traveler, "Island-Hopping in Kenya's Lamu Archipelago," 25 Mar. 2021 At the end of December, a production company filming a Super Bowl commercial decided to charter a private plane to transport the crew and stars from L.A. to Milwaukee and Green Bay, Wis., Zaher said. Anousha Sakoui, Star Tribune, "Private jet travel takes off in Hollywood amid pandemic," 21 Feb. 2021 The operation will extend service to Wheels Up members and customers who charter and share private jet flights. Doug Gollan, Forbes, "These Private Jet Companies Are Going VTOL," 10 Apr. 2021 Standing before a statue of Maggie Walker, the nation’s first Black woman to charter a bank, McClellan struggled to be heard over passing traffic. Washington Post, "Many Democrats said it was time for a Black woman to lead Virginia. But the party establishment is lining up behind Terry McAuliffe.," 9 Apr. 2021 Pinsky also noted a finding by auditors that there was no support of the basis to charter a flight for the shipment of the first tests at a cost of $464,369 when the second tests were shipped for a cost of $14,265. Brian Witte, Star Tribune, "Maryland audit faults procurement of 500K virus tests," 2 Apr. 2021 When the superintendent, Vincent Matthews, proposed using grant money to hire a consultant to help devise a reopening plan, the board voted against it, in part because the consultant had connections to charter schools. New York Times, "In San Francisco, Turmoil Over Reopening Schools Turns a City Against Itself," 29 Mar. 2021 Recent Examples on the Web: Adjective In Oakland, the district non-charter schools lost about 665 students year over year, bringing enrollment down to 35,489 — a record low among the past two decades. Jill Tucker, San Francisco Chronicle, "California lost a huge number of students amid the pandemic. What does it mean for schools?," 22 Apr. 2021 As has been the case in the last several election cycles, the pro-charter reform camp and traditional public school supporters have each backed a slate of candidates. Arika Herron, The Indianapolis Star, "Balance of power on Indianapolis Public Schools board up for grabs in election," 4 Nov. 2020 Instead, the union has emphasized calling voters, which the pro-charter side has done as well. Howard Blume Staff Writer, Los Angeles Times, "L.A. school board races show split between union- and charter-backed candidates," 3 Nov. 2020 Virus cases prompted shifts to virtual instruction Thursday for a school district in Hartman, a charter high school in Little Rock and a junior high in Pocahontas. Lara Farrar, Arkansas Online, "Case increase is third-largest at 1,202," 23 Oct. 2020 Allen is the choice of pro-charter education reform groups like Stand for Children and RISE Indy, which are largely supportive of the innovation network and efforts to expand school choice initiatives. Arika Herron, The Indianapolis Star, "Balance of power up for grabs in Indianapolis Public Schools board races," 12 Oct. 2020 Ludtke was a principal of a charter high school and had previously worked in the Clark County School District, and her daughters took advanced classes at a district middle school. Erin Richards, USA TODAY, "America's missing kids: Amid COVID and online school, thousands of students haven't shown up," 28 Sep. 2020 The report said none of the charter flights complied. NBC News, "Watchdog: $341,000 wasted on travel for former high-flying HHS chief Tom Price," 13 July 2018 Justifications for using charter flights were sometimes flimsy, the report concluded. Louise Radnofsky, WSJ, "HHS Watchdog Pushes to Recoup $341,000 Wasted by Ex-Secretary Price on Travel," 13 July 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'charter.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of charter

Noun

13th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

15th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Adjective

1922, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for charter

Noun and Verb

Middle English chartre, from Anglo-French, from Medieval Latin chartula, from Latin, diminutive of charta — see chart entry 1

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Time Traveler for charter

Time Traveler

The first known use of charter was in the 13th century

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Statistics for charter

Last Updated

2 May 2021

Cite this Entry

“Charter.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/charter. Accessed 12 May. 2021.

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More Definitions for charter

charter

noun

English Language Learners Definition of charter

 (Entry 1 of 3)

: a document issued by a government that gives rights to a person or group
: a document which declares that a city, town, school, or corporation has been established
: a document that describes the basic laws, principles, etc., of a group

charter

verb

English Language Learners Definition of charter (Entry 2 of 3)

: to give a charter to (a government, corporation, etc.)
: to hire (a ship, bus, etc.) for temporary use

charter

adjective

English Language Learners Definition of charter (Entry 3 of 3)

: hired for temporary use

charter

noun
char·​ter | \ ˈchär-tər How to pronounce charter (audio) \

Kids Definition of charter

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : an official document setting out the rights and duties of a group The charter grants broad trading rights.
2 : a document which declares that a city, town, school, or corporation has been established
3 : a document that describes the basic laws or principles of a group the charity's charter

charter

verb
chartered; chartering

Kids Definition of charter (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : to grant a charter to The city was chartered in 1853.
2 : to hire (as a bus or an aircraft) for temporary use The team chartered a plane.

charter

noun
char·​ter

Legal Definition of charter

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1a : a grant or guarantee of rights, powers, or privileges from an authority or agency of a state or country a state bank charter — compare constitution
b : a written instrument that creates and defines the powers and privileges of a city, educational institution, or corporation — compare articles of incorporation
2 : a written instrument from the authorities of a society creating a lodge, branch, or chapter
3 : a lease of a ship especially for the delivery of cargo

called also charter party

charter

transitive verb

Legal Definition of charter (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : to establish, enable, or convey by charter charter a bank
2 : to lease or hire for usually exclusive and temporary use charter a ship

History and Etymology for charter

Noun

Old French chartre letter, formal document, from Late Latin chartula, from Latin, diminutive of charta sheet of papyrus

Comments on charter

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