cephalopod

noun
ceph·​a·​lo·​pod | \ ˈse-fə-lə-ˌpäd How to pronounce cephalopod (audio) \

Definition of cephalopod

: any of a class (Cephalopoda) of marine mollusks including the squids, cuttlefishes, and octopuses that move by expelling water from a tubular siphon under the head and that have a group of muscular usually sucker-bearing arms around the front of the head, highly developed eyes, and usually a sac containing ink which is ejected for defense or concealment

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Other Words from cephalopod

cephalopod adjective

Examples of cephalopod in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web While cephalopods have many complex and elaborate features, they are thought to have evolved independently of the vertebrates. Courtney Linder, Popular Mechanics, "Team Uncovers Major New Truths About the Legendary Giant Squid," 16 Jan. 2020 The editors also seem to have some function in select tissues of adult organisms—such as the nervous system of cephalopods. Sara Reardon, Scientific American, "Step Aside, CRISPR: RNA Editing Is Taking Off," 5 Feb. 2020 The glue used on the cuttlefish lasted only a few days, Wardill said, and complied with institutional recommendations for cephalopods. Ryan Prior, CNN, "Scientists put 3D glasses on cuttlefish and showed them film clips. The results were surprising," 9 Jan. 2020 Giant mollusks with flanged shells that looked like alien cruisers disappeared forever, and many species of nautilus-like cephalopods called ammonites also went extinct. National Geographic, "Earth has had more major mass extinctions than we realized," 18 Dec. 2019 But last year, René Hoffmann, a paleontologist at Ruhr-Universität Bochum in Germany, stumbled across the image, depicting what appeared to be a cephalopod, a predecessor of today’s squids, octopuses and cuttlefish. Katherine J. Wu, Smithsonian Magazine, "Pterosaur Tooth Found in Rare Ancient Squid Fossil," 4 Feb. 2020 And since 2012, he's been looking at the vision of cephalopods, the class of mollusks of which cuttlefish are a part. Ryan Prior, CNN, "Scientists put 3D glasses on cuttlefish and showed them film clips. The results were surprising," 9 Jan. 2020 There’s just one unusual detail: The diminutive cephalopod is wearing snazzy 3-D glasses. New York Times, "Yes, This Cuttlefish Is Wearing 3-D Glasses," 8 Jan. 2020 As naturalist Sy Montgomery and philosopher of science Peter Godfrey-Smith have eloquently explained, these cephalopods can navigate mazes, solve puzzles, play pranks and engineer escapes from aquarium tanks. Aziz Huq, Washington Post, "Do we have moral obligations to a machine that achieves consciousness?," 22 Nov. 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'cephalopod.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of cephalopod

1826, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for cephalopod

ultimately from cephal- + Greek pod-, pous foot — more at foot

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Time Traveler for cephalopod

Time Traveler

The first known use of cephalopod was in 1826

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Statistics for cephalopod

Last Updated

26 Mar 2020

Cite this Entry

“Cephalopod.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/cephalopod. Accessed 3 Apr. 2020.

More from Merriam-Webster on cephalopod

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with cephalopod

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about cephalopod

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