buzz

verb
\ ˈbəz How to pronounce buzz (audio) \
buzzed; buzzing; buzzes

Definition of buzz

 (Entry 1 of 2)

intransitive verb

1 : to make a low continuous humming sound like that of a bee
2a : murmur, whisper
b : to be filled with a confused murmur the room buzzed with excitement
3 : to make a signal with a buzzer
4 : to go quickly : hurry buzzed around town in a sports car also : scram usually used with off
5 : to feel high especially from a drug

transitive verb

1 : to utter covertly by or as if by whispering
2 : to cause to buzz
3 : to fly fast and close to planes buzz the crowd
4 : to summon or signal with a buzzer also : to let in through an electronically controlled entrance used with in or through buzzed him in
5 dialectal, England : to drink to the last drop get some more port whilst I buzz this bottle— W. M. Thackeray

buzz

noun

Definition of buzz (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : a persistent vibratory sound
2a : a confused murmur
b : rumor, gossip
c : a flurry of activity
d : fad, craze
e : speculative or excited talk or attention relating especially to a new or forthcoming product or event one of the few new shows that's getting good buzzTV Guide also : an instance of such talk or attention their first CD created a huge buzz
3 : a signal conveyed by buzzer specifically : a telephone call
4 slang : high sense 4

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Synonyms for buzz

Synonyms: Verb

abound, brim, bristle, bulge, burst, bustle, crawl, hum, overflow, pullulate, swarm, teem

Synonyms: Noun

call, ring

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Examples of buzz in a Sentence

Verb

Flies were buzzing around the picnic tables. The hall buzzed with excitement as the audience waited for the show to start. My mind is buzzing with ideas. The nurse buzzed the doctor who was on duty. She buzzed her secretary to say she was going out for lunch. Ring the bell when you arrive and someone will buzz you into the building. Let me buzz you out.

Noun

We heard the buzz of the bees as we walked through the garden. When the machine is turned on, it makes a quiet buzz. There was a buzz of voices in the hall as the audience waited for the show to start. What's the latest buzz about their marriage? The buzz is that she turned down the job because the pay was too low. There's been quite a buzz about the new movie. The team's new players are creating a buzz among baseball fans. There's been a lot of buzz about the new movie.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

Cellphone warnings that buzzed in Sendai gave university students enough time to shelter under their desks during a lecture, said Richard Allen, director of the Berkeley Seismological Laboratory. Emily Baumgaertner, latimes.com, "L.A.’s ShakeAlert earthquake warning app worked exactly as planned. That’s the problem," 15 July 2019 Brandon Workman struck out the side in the ninth to keep Fenway buzzing, but there would be no celebration for the home fans. Julian Mcwilliams, BostonGlobe.com, "A statement win was there for the taking, but Red Sox couldn’t seal the deal," 15 July 2019 The jokes here are by turns earnest and cynical, and there is insight buzzing in the messy mergers of the two: To be alive right now is often to feel tangled and disoriented. Megan Garber, The Atlantic, "Aziz Ansari and the Physics of Moving Forward," 11 July 2019 Rico Portal’s hair rains into soft piles as Mike buzzes at his neck and angles the clipper up around his ears, nipping quickly in for errant ear hairs. Catherine Blinder, courant.com, "Neighborhood barbershops: A place to belong, to talk truths, to become men," 10 July 2019 Hours after an awesome Home Run Derby got everyone buzzing even louder about monster shots and juiced balls, only a couple flew out of Progressive Field on Tuesday. Ben Walker, The Mercury News, "AL strikes out 16, holds off NL for 4-3 win in All-Star Game," 9 July 2019 Often, the frame is filled with a big, buzzing group of people who are connected by a solid family structure in which tradition governs the actions of each individual. Alissa Wilkinson, Vox, "The Farewell is a stunning leading role debut for Awkwafina," 9 July 2019 Keep in mind, Kkoki stays buzzing all night long, therefore reservations are recommended for larger groups. Gerry Frank, oregonlive.com, "Grill and chill at a Korean barbecue restaurant: Gerry Frank’s picks," 7 July 2019 Move-over law, Interstate 71 On June 24, an Ohio Highway Patrol trooper called police when a Chevrolet closely buzzed by the law officer, who had just pulled over another vehicle on I-71. John Benson, cleveland.com, "Women with warrants caught stealing clothing from Pearl Road store: Strongsville Police Blotter," 3 July 2019

Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

And Eloy Jimenez and Dylan Cease have created buzz as rookies. Lamond Pope, chicagotribune.com, "Will Alex Colome be traded? What to expect out of Dylan Cease? 5 questions for the White Sox in the 2nd half," 11 July 2019 An investigation into the Ramona man’s techniques and claims has caused a rod maker to cut ties and created a worldwide buzz in the fishing community. San Diego Union-Tribune, "Column: Legend of San Diego big-bass icon Mike Long is shattered," 3 July 2019 Today, after a brief shutdown and a top-to-bottom $121 million renovation, the legendary resort is back, and creating a major buzz in the Caribbean (at a time when the islands still need it). Pamela Wright, BostonGlobe.com, "Legendary Belmond Cap Juluca resort is back and creating a buzz on Anguilla," 2 July 2019 Beyond an error-free performance, success on a presidential debate stage is making news - perhaps even generating a viral moment - and creating a buzz for donors magnified by social media. Bill Lambrecht, ExpressNews.com, "Texan Julián Castro needs a spark tonight in first Democratic debate," 26 June 2019 Armed with a journalism degree and previous PR experience, Jenny created some buzz about her design work being TV-worthy, and the opportunities have followed ever since. Maggie Burch, House Beautiful, ""How A 'Property Brothers' Episode Changed My Life"," 12 Jan. 2019 As the games pile up, developments that would typically ignite little interest — even a 0-15 deficit on a player’s serve — create a buzz in the crowd. Christopher Clarey, New York Times, "Wimbledon: After Many, Many Hours, Kevin Anderson Beats John Isner in the Semifinals," 13 July 2018 By at least one metric, though, Tebow apparently has created the most buzz. Stephen Ruiz, OrlandoSentinel.com, "$145, anyone? Tim Tebow helps drive online cost of Eastern League All-Star Game ticket," 10 July 2018 As much as the backyard farmers of Silicon Valley lavish love on their heritage breeds, this tech hub is constantly looking for the Next Big Thing creating buzz. CBS News, "Backyard chickens rule the roost in Silicon Valley," 25 June 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'buzz.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of buzz

Verb

14th century, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense 1

Noun

circa 1600, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for buzz

Verb

Middle English bussen, of imitative origin

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Learn More about buzz

Dictionary Entries near buzz

buy up

Buzain

Buzau

buzz

buzzard

buzzard's-berry

buzzard cult

Statistics for buzz

Last Updated

18 Jul 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for buzz

The first known use of buzz was in the 14th century

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More Definitions for buzz

buzz

verb

English Language Learners Definition of buzz

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to make the low, continuous sound of a flying insect (such as a bee)
: to make a low, continuous sound
: to be filled with a low, continuous sound

buzz

noun

English Language Learners Definition of buzz (Entry 2 of 2)

: the low, continuous sound made by a flying insect (such as a bee)
: a low, continuous sound
: a low sound caused by many people talking at the same time

buzz

verb
\ ˈbəz How to pronounce buzz (audio) \
buzzed; buzzing

Kids Definition of buzz

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : to make a low humming sound like that of bees
2 : to be filled with a low hum or murmur The room buzzed with excitement.
3 : to fly an airplane low over

buzz

noun

Kids Definition of buzz (Entry 2 of 2)

: a low humming sound

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More from Merriam-Webster on buzz

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with buzz

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for buzz

Spanish Central: Translation of buzz

Nglish: Translation of buzz for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of buzz for Arabic Speakers

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