blunder

verb
blun·der | \ ˈblən-dər \
blundered; blundering\ˈblən-d(ə-)riŋ \

Definition of blunder 

(Entry 1 of 2)

intransitive verb

1 : to move unsteadily or confusedly In their exhaustion they often blundered against each other … —Norman Mailer

2 : to make a mistake through stupidity, ignorance, or carelessness blundered by not acting sooner

transitive verb

1 : to utter stupidly, confusedly, or thoughtlessly blundered an apology

2 : to make a stupid, careless, or thoughtless mistake in blundering matters through ignorance … —Rafael Sabatini

blunder

noun

Definition of blunder (Entry 2 of 2)

: a gross error or mistake resulting usually from stupidity, ignorance, or carelessness a costly tactical blunder

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Other words from blunder

Verb

blunderer \ˈblən-dər-ər \ noun

Choose the Right Synonym for blunder

Noun

error, mistake, blunder, slip, lapse mean a departure from what is true, right, or proper. error suggests the existence of a standard or guide and a straying from the right course through failure to make effective use of this. procedural errors mistake implies misconception or inadvertence and usually expresses less criticism than error. dialed the wrong number by mistake blunder regularly imputes stupidity or ignorance as a cause and connotes some degree of blame. diplomatic blunders slip stresses inadvertence or accident and applies especially to trivial but embarrassing mistakes. a slip of the tongue lapse stresses forgetfulness, weakness, or inattention as a cause. a lapse in judgment

Examples of blunder in a Sentence

Verb

We blundered along through the woods until we finally found the trail. Another skier blundered into his path. The government blundered by not acting sooner.

Noun

The accident was the result of a series of blunders. fixed a minor blunder in the advertising flyer
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Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

Mr Grayling’s loyalty to the prime minister and to the Brexit cause mean he may be allowed to blunder on. The Economist, "British railways are reduced to chaos by a botched timetable change," 7 June 2018 The unboxing is meant to increase suspense, but the nonstop blundering only provides unease. Kelly Conaboy, The Cut, "Please Face It: Instagram Story ‘Unboxing’ Does Not Work," 13 July 2018 This bumbling, bungling, blundering media misadventure quite possibly changed the course of Magic history. Mike Bianchi, OrlandoSentinel.com, "Worst day of Dwight Howard's life was also one of worst days in Orlando Magic history," 18 June 2018 In one of the most dangerous moments in the Cold War, in 1983, US-Moscow tensions nearly led to the two rivals blundering into nuclear war. Stephen Collinson, CNN, "Trump's toughness on Russia judged against his predecessors," 9 June 2018 After a mix-up by their blundering fertility doctor, a couple is mistakenly impregnated with the wrong child. Matthew J. Palm, OrlandoSentinel.com, "New Pegasus PlayLab theater festival brings new works to UCF," 7 June 2018 Here’s the hardest thing to understand about the Rally Goose, the confused Canada goose that blundered into Comerica Park (and our hearts) during a rain delay in Wednesday’s Tigers-Angels game. Si.com Staff, SI.com, "Nine Innings: The Indians' Surprisingly Bad Bullpen, the State of the NL West and Culberson's Magic," 4 June 2018 Tan sacrificed, but more likely blundered, a pawn in the early middlegame and then allowed Black to gather her pieces around her king. Chris Chase, BostonGlobe.com, "Chess notes," 20 May 2018 Many felt that the program had been unfairly seized upon as a distraction by conservative opponents of gun control, who preferred to focus on blundering by the district and the sheriff’s office. David Fleshler, Sun-Sentinel.com, "School district shuts down information after Stoneman Douglas shooting," 12 May 2018

Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

Plus, we power rank the biggest mental blunders in recent Bengals and sports history in honor of JR Smith. Paul Dehner Jr., Cincinnati.com, "Bengals Beat Podcast: Answering your questions," 6 June 2018 So, rather than taking an administration to task for another in a series of racist blunders, instead, look forward to the young people of the next generation who are already leading the way in changing policies. Taylor Crumpton, Teen Vogue, "I Already Knew What the White House Intern Photo Showed Me," 6 Apr. 2018 June 13, 2018 There have been too many blunders, too much lost trust, through the decades to think otherwise. Christopher Clarey, New York Times, "Video Review Will Make the World Cup Better, but Not Quieter," 17 June 2018 Now he was being quizzed about his body language and leadership following J.R. Smith’s notorious blunder, and his patience was running thin. Ben Golliver, SI.com, "Leaning on LeBron: Can the King's Cape Carry the Cavaliers' Cast in Game 3?," 6 June 2018 Political blunder: San Diego City Councilman Chris Cate agreed to pay a fine of $1,500 for including 60 city employees on a reelection committee email. Diane Bell, sandiegouniontribune.com, "How much are the doggies in the window? $200,000 for these two Labs — here's why," 23 Apr. 2018 The blunder short-circuited what looked to be a budding rally. Matt Breen, Philly.com, "Phillies lose to Braves to snap winning streak," 16 Apr. 2018 Take away the block-charge reverse and Smith's blunder, and the Cavs played better than the defending champions in the series opener. Michael Singer, USA TODAY, "Cleveland Cavaliers' Ty Lue has confidence in team, J.R. Smith after frustrating Game 1," 1 June 2018 The immediate impact of Karius' blunder was offset by Mane's equalizer in the 55th. Rob Harris, courant.com, "Bale's Scissor-Kick Gives Madrid 3rd Straight European Title," 26 May 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'blunder.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of blunder

Verb

14th century, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense 1

Noun

1681, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for blunder

Verb

Middle English blundren, probably of Scandinavian origin; akin to Old Norse blunda to shut one's eyes, doze, Norwegian dialect blundra

Noun

noun derivative of blunder entry 1

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Dictionary Entries near blunder

Blum

blume

Blumea

blunder

blunderbush

blunderbuss

blunderhead

Statistics for blunder

Last Updated

21 Aug 2018

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for blunder

The first known use of blunder was in the 14th century

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More Definitions for blunder

blunder

verb

English Language Learners Definition of blunder

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to move in an awkward or confused way

: to make a stupid or careless mistake

blunder

noun

English Language Learners Definition of blunder (Entry 2 of 2)

: a bad mistake made because of stupidity or carelessness

blunder

verb
blun·der | \ ˈblən-dər \
blundered; blundering

Kids Definition of blunder

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : to move in a clumsy way

2 : to make a mistake

blunder

noun

Kids Definition of blunder (Entry 2 of 2)

: a bad or stupid mistake

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Comments on blunder

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